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t-tomshooter
May 11th, 2010, 11:34 PM
Anybody every trie a milo food plot? i was thinking about trying one out, any suggestions. Thanks;)

410gage
May 13th, 2010, 09:01 AM
I have planted sorghum which, I believe, is a kissin' cousin or the same as milo. It is considered more of a "bird" wildlife plot, for pheasants and quail. Actually Pheasants Forever gave me the sorghum seed to plant. Turkey would also benefit late in the year once the grain develops a seed head. And it is also a good cover crop.
But for deer, there are many better choices for an annual food plot. Good Luck!

t-tomshooter
May 13th, 2010, 12:48 PM
Yeah this is mainly for everything food plot, since we quail and turkey hunt also, just wandering when is best time to plant? thanks

SlimTastic
May 18th, 2010, 05:57 PM
We put in our sorghum plots (alternate grain and forage sorghum) around the 4th of July...depending on the weather...South Central South Dakota.

t-tomshooter
May 18th, 2010, 07:42 PM
(alternate grain and forage sorghum) what types? and does the forage sorghum go to seed for late winter feeding? thanks

SlimTastic
May 20th, 2010, 11:05 AM
I honestly don't know the specific varietys we plant...grain sorghum is milo and forage sorghum is known as cane around here. We alternate both in planter width strips to form wider strips. With sufficient moisture the cane will grow to 10 feet. It goes to seed...but isn't really utilized (by deer) as a food source...corn, beans, and wheat are everywhere. The cane does make for excellent bedding cover though. The milo is a great food source for pheasants...but the deer don't seem to feed heavily on it, due to better options. We alternate the two because the cane is nearly impossible to walk let alone shoot out of, but its the best cover. The milo is better bird food and makes for easy walking, but doesn't provide the best cover. The combination is the best thing we have found for pheasant food and cover plots. Our plots are 90 feet wide (same as the sprayer) and up to 1/3 mile long. Most are located adjacent to trees (shelterbelts) and a water source (stock dams)...everything they need in one location.

While pheasant hunting we bump deer out of the plots all the time. We try to minimize pressure and not hunt the same strip more than once in any given week, and the deer always seem to come back...the roosters do too.

t-tomshooter
May 22nd, 2010, 12:18 PM
Great thanks man for all the info!;)