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BLUE72CAMARO
July 12th, 2010, 05:59 PM
I have a 2 acre clover plot I planted this year and I have a good stand of clover in it but I do have some grass that came up as well. What spray is best for killing off grasses and not hurting the clover. Also the cheaper the better as well!

slamnationalley
July 12th, 2010, 06:18 PM
Use "Poast" herbicide. Kills grasses like bermuda, fescue, blue grasses, but not broadleaf. If you have problems with woody plants (goldenrod, thistle, etc.) the only way to control is spot spray with Roundup (Glyphosphate) or use a wick system with Glyphosphate. This is how I treat all my clover plots. Been doing this for 8-years with no problem. It's best to hit your plots in the spring before the fescue and other grasses get a seed top on them.

Good luck.

Peace!!!!!!

Just_Some_Guy
July 12th, 2010, 08:08 PM
Personal opinion, but I wouldn't spray on anything I wouldn't put on my food. Whatever you spray will end up in and on the plot and then in the deer. JMHO

M.Magis
July 13th, 2010, 09:43 AM
Personal opinion, but I wouldn't spray on anything I wouldn't put on my food. Whatever you spray will end up in and on the plot and then in the deer. JMHO

I didn't see anyone ask your opinion. :confused:
Sethoxydim (Poast) works, as does clethodim (Arrow, and some other names). Most people who have used both say that clethodim works much better. I've only used clethodim, but can say that it wiped out all grasses. That being said, none of it is cheap. A gallon of Arrow and 2.5 gallons of crop oil run around $150 through Keystone. You may be able to find it locally but I couldn't. I split a gallon with a buddy.

BLUE72CAMARO
July 13th, 2010, 11:07 AM
I didn't see anyone ask your opinion. :confused:
Sethoxydim (Poast) works, as does clethodim (Arrow, and some other names). Most people who have used both say that clethodim works much better. I've only used clethodim, but can say that it wiped out all grasses. That being said, none of it is cheap. A gallon of Arrow and 2.5 gallons of crop oil run around $150 through Keystone. You may be able to find it locally but I couldn't. I split a gallon with a buddy.

What is the coverage area for a gallon of the stuff?

On the guy that wouldnt spray it because it will end up in the deer. Are you a vegetarian? If not and you buy any beef from a store I guarantee they have ate something that was sprayed with herbicide or pesticide on a much more regular basis than a deer ever will.

RockChucker30
July 13th, 2010, 11:12 AM
Most everyone who has tried both poast and clethodim give the nod to clethodim.

IIRC, the application rate is 8 oz. per acre, so a gallon will last a while. I have seen reports of people using non-ionic surfacant instead of crop oil with good results, but I haven't tried it yet.

Ditto Keystone for a source.

BLUE72CAMARO
July 13th, 2010, 12:10 PM
Well I just called my old man to tell him and he found out last night that the farmer we hunt on and have the food plot on has an old wick system that we can mount on the bucket of our tractor to use roundup. Seems that should be much cheaper than the other alternatives and the grass is about a foot taller than the clover so I think it should work well for us.

bowhuntr311
July 13th, 2010, 12:16 PM
if you have a wick system already and the conditions are right it will work WAY better than celethodim (sp) based product.

M.Magis
July 13th, 2010, 12:27 PM
if you have a wick system already and the conditions are right it will work WAY better than celethodim (sp) based product.

I'm not sure what you would base that on, but clethodim works extremely well. Dead is dead, and I'm not sure how you could get "WAY" better than that. However, gly is cheaper and that's the way I would go if possible.

BLUE72CAMARO
July 13th, 2010, 12:55 PM
if you have a wick system already and the conditions are right it will work WAY better than celethodim (sp) based product.

Yeah the wick system is ready to go, just need to pick up some juice for it. I think it will work extremely well on most of the plot. It may be a little tricky on the water way but as long as I go sideways across the hills I think I should be able to get could contact and stay out of the clover.

I was planning on mowing this weekend but looks like I may do this instead and hopefully be able to mow the next weekend.

bowhuntr311
July 13th, 2010, 05:58 PM
I. Dead is dead, and I'm not sure how you could get "WAY" better than that. However, gly is cheaper and that's the way I would go if possible.

True enough dead is dead. I have been using Poast Plus the last 2 years. I have only used the wick system my self one time so mybe I shouldnt have said that. However, the one time I was able to use the wick system there was alot more than just grass in the plot. 3wks later when I went back to look at it and I had a great kill. I was impressed. The clethodim has a tough time killing off non grass plants. I know that its not supposed to, but if I have a chance to kill everything above the crop why not kill it all instead of just the grass.


PS I HATE THISTLE.

Just_Some_Guy
July 13th, 2010, 08:28 PM
I didn't see anyone ask your opinion. :confused:
.

Huh, I could have sworn that it looked like an open public forum when I walked in. Whoda' thunk it.

thunder
July 13th, 2010, 08:55 PM
the roundup rope wick will only kill the grass that is above the clover, and i'm betting there is a lot that is not above the clover. I'm sure you will be happier in a month if you spray poast, select, arrow, or shadow type products. thirty years as a ag chem dealer gives my answer some value.

Just_some_guy, this site is not normally frequented by organic leaning people, or should i say people who are scared of modern chemistry. it doesn't help that you are a newbie ( to this site)

Just_Some_Guy
July 13th, 2010, 09:17 PM
the roundup rope wick will only kill the grass that is above the clover, and i'm betting there is a lot that is not above the clover. I'm sure you will be happier in a month if you spray poast, select, arrow, or shadow type products. thirty years as a ag chem dealer gives my answer some value.

Just_some_guy, this site is not normally frequented by organic leaning people, or should i say people who are scared of modern chemistry. it doesn't help that you are a newbie ( to this site)

Sir,


Being that I'm used to a much rougher around the edges site I temper my responses here. I'm not scared of moderny chemisty, not one bit. I do think it's a bit odd to pour or spray chemicals on a source of food, however many trophic levels away it may be.

I love hunting and being in the woods, and eating the stuff I kill. Having had far too many family members die from chemicals used on farms over the years and suffering other medical calamities from chemical exposure and having been wrongly diagnosed myself with cancer just before my 30th birthday, will cause a man to take pause and think about what he's doing and what he puts in his body and into nature.

That said I believe I was polite in expressing my opinion. Good luck to you all on your plots.

scrapejuice
July 13th, 2010, 11:07 PM
i didnt' think your response was out of line. Welcome to AT.

to the OP, I used Poast on mine a few weeks ago, but to be honest I wasn't overly impressed with it. It didn't just wipe the grass out like spraying it with round-up, but rather just seems to supress its growth while the clover overtakes it. Maybe I did something wrong, I don't know?

M.Magis
July 14th, 2010, 10:30 AM
Sir,


. Having had far too many family members die from chemicals used on farms over the years .

Care to give a little more explanation?

M.Magis
July 14th, 2010, 10:36 AM
True enough dead is dead. I have been using Poast Plus the last 2 years. I have only used the wick system my self one time so mybe I shouldnt have said that. However, the one time I was able to use the wick system there was alot more than just grass in the plot. 3wks later when I went back to look at it and I had a great kill. I was impressed. The clethodim has a tough time killing off non grass plants. I know that its not supposed to, but if I have a chance to kill everything above the crop why not kill it all instead of just the grass.


PS I HATE THISTLE.

Clethodim and sethoxydim are both grass specific herbicides, so yes, they don't do any good for broadleaf weeds. That is an advantage of using a wick with gly. The downside is that not all grass and weeds will be beneath the clover, so there will always be some left. I've also had trouble getting a good kill on certain broadleaf weeds with gly.

JayP
July 21st, 2010, 10:16 PM
I have been doing research on Clethodim and looks like I'll be spraying that on an overgrown cattle field that has clover. I frost seeded red clover in February but the grass is taking over. Should I spray the field within the next month or do it next Spring?

M.Magis
July 22nd, 2010, 09:06 AM
Spray when the grass is actively growing. If you're in a dry spell, hold off until you get some good rain. Being here in Ohio, you're probably good to go whenever. We've had some rain in the last week.

JayP
July 22nd, 2010, 09:10 AM
I have read the label for the Clethodim but I did not see anything about if it's rain proof after a certain amount of time or to spray when rain is not in the forecast. Any thoughts?

M.Magis
July 22nd, 2010, 09:44 AM
One hour. It's on page six of the Arrow label.

RockChucker30
July 22nd, 2010, 09:45 AM
I try to not spray anything if rain is coming the same day unless I have to, and then I still want 4-6 hours for the chemicals to absorb. If you spray today and it rains tomorrow, you're fine. If it rains in 30 minutes, you may have a problem.

JayP
July 22nd, 2010, 09:45 AM
Thanks for the information.

psehunter79
July 23rd, 2010, 01:16 PM
As long as the chemical dries on the plant before it rains your fine, you don't have to wait untill it rains. Chemicals work at the cells of the plants so as long as it gets on it your good. If you spray, anything under the canopy of the clover that doesn't get sprayed will not die. You can spray in the fall when the plants are going dormant. The plant will adsorb the chem and when it starts to grow in the spring, it will die.

InAZone
July 23rd, 2010, 02:49 PM
I have a very new clover/chicory plot (2 weeks) and I already see the foxtail germinating. At what stage will I be able to spray out the fostail with clethodim without harming the brand new clover and chicory?

psehunter79
July 23rd, 2010, 03:22 PM
You need to wait awhile and let your new plants get established. If you spray now you will kill them since they are "frail". If there is still ungerminated seed on the ground you will damage the seed coat and kill the germination. As far as how long to wait I would say give it a month. You could always go out and spot spray or just weed-eat if you want to keep the seed on the foxtail from maturing. As long as the foxtail doesn't go to head and dry up then the seed isn't mature yet and probably won't grow.

jim p
July 27th, 2010, 01:24 PM
Let me start by saying that I don't know what I am talking about.

If you use roundup on the tall weeds with a wick system on the front of the front end loader and then run over the weeds with the wheels pushing them down into the clover wouldn't this kill the clover? Now if you put the wick system on the back of the tractor you wont kill the clover by pushing the treated grass into the clover but you wouldn't kill the grass where the tractor wheels pushed the grass down either.

Would it be better to spray and then come back and mow the tall broadleaf stuff?