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scottydude003
December 10th, 2010, 07:00 AM
im am looking at buying a hoyt dorado as a substitute for my hoyt maxxis compound. iv heard the poundage you need on a recurve is based on your draw length. how would i find my draw length?

Night Wing
December 10th, 2010, 07:54 AM
If you're by yourself, a simple way is to get a full length arrow shaft, say a 32" shaft. Then attach a clothes pin about 7" down from the tip of the arrow shaft. Draw the bow with the long arrow shaft until you come to your anchor point at full draw. As you come to your anchor point, the clothes pin will hit the front of the riser and it will slide down the arrow shaft towards the tip. When you're at your anchor point, then slowly let down. Then measure the arrow shaft from the valley of the nock where it is seated against the bowstring to the beginning of the clothes pin. This will be your draw length. Try it a few times to get a few measurements.

BowmanJay
December 10th, 2010, 09:52 AM
you've heard wrong. Your selected poundage is based on your ability to shoot and be comfortable shooting that poundage. Your DL is important for shaft selection and tuning of that bow. Typically coming from the compound world to trad you will want to start with a lower poundage and work your way up to a goal you choose.

Yojimbo
December 10th, 2010, 10:29 AM
BJ is absolutely correct but that is not how I read his question.

The way I read the question is a question I frequently have. All bows tell you their draw weight @ 28". Being tall I draw 32" & the draw weight is correspondingly higher. I frequently wonder about my PSA. It is 55# @ 28" but what is it at 32"??

That is how I read his question & to answer it I know of no matrix to determine draw weight at a given distance past 28".

Viper1
December 10th, 2010, 10:42 AM
Y -

Providing the bow hasn't reached its stack point the "matrix" is fairly simple:

28"-brace height / 20 = number of pounds gained or lost above or below 28"

Ex 28" - 8" / 20 or for a 50# @ 28" bow with an 8" brace height

In your case a 55# at 28" bow with an 8" BH, drawn to 32" you get:

55/20 = 27.5# per inch. 2.75# x 4" = 11# more at 32" or 66#.

Can't argue with that, as it's simple Physics. The only catches are 1. was the bow really marked correctly and 2. has the bow begun to stack (ie, has the DF curve become non-linear.)

Since most bows discussed here are in the 30# - 60#, we can generally say 1.5 - 3# per inch and still be pretty close.

...or you could just use a scale ;)

Viper1 out.

Sanford
December 10th, 2010, 12:17 PM
The only catches are 1. was the bow really marked correctly
Viper1 out.

There is the caveat that needs repeating on these Dorados and Gamemasters. There is the catch of matching apples-to-apples, too. They have a thin riser. The 28" standard on the bow is considering that the archer is pulling 28" as measured out at least 3/4" from the back of the bow. Given the limbs can be marked slightly underweight to begin with, and then someone uses the clothespin measure method (or from back of their other bow), the sum of these two misgivings can add up to a bow that pulls a lot more than what its label states.

I find these bows stack pretty fast for us longer DL folks, especially the 60" Dorado. If one was looking at the label alone and not considering the above measurement and "their" DL, that marked DW will be even harder to work the math from.

Yojimbo
December 10th, 2010, 01:31 PM
Thanks Viper!

I have never seen that equation. It does confirm what I thought, I guessed 60-65lbs :D

bearauto11
December 10th, 2010, 01:33 PM
Viper,
I may be a little math challenged.
(28 dl-8 bh) / 20 = 1# per inch
Where did the 55 / 20 come from?
Sorry. I'm just confused.
Thanks,
--Tom

Viper1
December 10th, 2010, 01:50 PM
bear -

No, you're not math challenged, but pretty sure I am ...

Let's try this again ... (sorry Y, my bad)

DRAW WEIGHT @ 28" / 28" - Brace height = number of pounds gained or lost above or below 28"

Ex: 55# (the marked DW of Y's bow) / 28" - 8" or for a 55# @ 28" bow with an 8" brace height

In Y's case, a 55# at 28" bow with an 8" BH, drawn to 32" you get:

55#/20 = 27.5# per inch. 2.75# x 4" = 11# more at 32" or 66#.

I probably should just copy and paste this stuff, rather than trying to do it off the cuff before a few cups of coffee.

Viper1 out.

scottydude003
December 10th, 2010, 07:52 PM
so lets say my draw length is 29in. i can pick weather i want a 40# or 50# draw?

Viper1
December 10th, 2010, 09:13 PM
scotty -

You won't know what your real draw length is until you've been shooting for a while. Your form, and therefore your DL, will be in a state of flux until things come together. Most people increase their DL by about 1" or so after a few months.

I'd also start lower than 40#, otherwise the odds are good you won't reach your full draw length, because you'll tire too quickly to let your form settle. Low 30# is about right for most stickbow newbies.

The advice is free, and you can of course, take it or leave it.

Viper1 out.

scottydude003
December 10th, 2010, 09:20 PM
dont get me wrong im loving the advise right now. but im pulling back a 70Lb. compound bow with ease and i want to be able to hunt deer with this dorado im planning on buying. my draw on my compound is either 28 or 29in i think. but in my state it is illegal to hunt for deer with a bow under 45#. now im thinking about putting a sight and arrow rest on this and using an aided arrow release. now based on that what do you recommend?

Viper1
December 10th, 2010, 09:31 PM
scotty -

Exactly what is your holding weight on your 70# compound? Do the math - and remember the weight is now on your fingers.

The recommendations haven't changed. The purpose of the exercise, from my point of view anyway, is give you a strong enough foundation so you CAN increase to legal hunting draw weights later on and still be able to shoot accurately. Despite some Internet bowhunting theories, you really should learn how to shoot before you go out hunting. But how you do it, has to be your call.

Two other things, the classic advise of trying a number of bows/draw weights and see what "feels' comfortable is total hogwash. Drawing or even shooting a bow a few times has little or no relation to shooting for 1/2 or a full hour and trying to get it (your form) right. Second and most important - find a coach or instructor. Let him/her watch you shoot and they will tell you what weight you need. But, I will bet that any qualified coach will tell you the same thing I just did ;)

Viper1 out.

IAIS604
December 10th, 2010, 09:51 PM
Scot -

Look up the let-off for your compound bow. If, say, it's 70% then you are REALLY holding only 30% of the weight:

0.30 x 70 lbs = 21 lbs at full draw.

For a recurve, there is no let-off. You hold it all.

bowboy09
December 10th, 2010, 10:43 PM
If you're by yourself, a simple way is to get a full length arrow shaft, say a 32" shaft. Then attach a clothes pin about 7" down from the tip of the arrow shaft. Draw the bow with the long arrow shaft until you come to your anchor point at full draw. As you come to your anchor point, the clothes pin will hit the front of the riser and it will slide down the arrow shaft towards the tip. When you're at your anchor point, then slowly let down. Then measure the arrow shaft from the valley of the nock where it is seated against the bowstring to the beginning of the clothes pin. This will be your draw length. Try it a few times to get a few measurements.

Thats an awesome idea.Wish i knew that a long time ago

bearauto11
December 11th, 2010, 12:15 PM
Let's try this again ...
Got it now! That makes a lot of sense. Can I use that same formula to go to a shorter draw length?
Thanks,
--Tom

Viper1
December 11th, 2010, 12:34 PM
Tom -

Yup, works both ways.

BTW, to be correct, that line should have been - DRAW WEIGHT @ 28" / 28" - Brace height = number of pounds gained or lost PER INCH above or below 28" But I guess you got that.

I really have to learn to proof read my stuff ...

Viper1 out.

bearauto11
December 11th, 2010, 10:46 PM
Yeah I got it. That's really cool. It will be real helpful as I look at kid bows and try to figure draw weight at their length.
Thanks,
--Tom