PDA

View Full Version : Will this make a difference?



Stubby'smom
May 16th, 2011, 12:43 PM
Ok, so we bought a bitzenburger jig quite awhile ago used and it didn't come with instruction. Someone told us it was set up the right way, however I now believe it isn't. I've fletched 3 sets of arrows, 1st 3 feathers not off set, 2nd 3 feathers with a right helical using a friends jig, 3rd is where I noticed something might not be right. I'm using 2" vanetechs and set them off set for my 3D arrows. They don't look like they are quite right. It looks like the spacing is off. I'm not happy with how I am shooting them right now either. It could be me, but I'm shooting them out to 60 yards and once I get past 30 I become quite inconsistant with them. I'm still working on keeping consistent form, but I should still be shooting better than what I am. It's my understanding that when fletching with 3 vanes, each should be 120 degrees apart correct? That would put them at the same distance between each one right? Would incorrect fletching job cause greater inconsistency at longer distances? I'm looking for pinpoint accuracy for tournament shooting. Yes, I know practice makes perfect, I do that. I just need my equipment to be as perfect as possible too for the level I want to be competitive at. If I need to refletch, how do I set my jig up correctly?

practice-more
May 16th, 2011, 06:32 PM
On the jig, just in front of the indexing nob there should be three set screws. You want to have one of the turned in and the other two backed out.

Top one in will give your 3 fletch at 120 degrees each
Middle one will give you 4 fletch at 90 degrees each
Bottom one will give you 4 fletch at 75-105-75-105

That should be stamped right on the jig.

Also, the "center" marks for setting the offset are usually not a true center. If you are using a strait clamp and fletching with a true offset then you will need to center the vane on the arrow by adjusting the left/right at the top and bottom of the jig. Once you have it centered, you can move the top right and the bottom left (r-offset). The more you move them, the more offset you will get, but if you move them too far you will notice the top right and bottom left corners of the vane will not stick. Play with it a little before you put any glue on. Then double check your first vane or two, you might have to strip and re-do the first couple until you get it all set.

The more offset you can put on the fletch, the more stability you will get, the drawback is that since this stability comes from drag, you will loose a touch more down range velocity. If you want even more stability you can look into a right helical clamp. The clam has a curve to it that will help "wrap" the vane around the shaft even more.

I believe a wrote a set of instructions one time for a technical writing class, I could e-mail them to you if I can find them.

Mitch

Stubby'smom
May 17th, 2011, 04:45 PM
Thanks! The way you put it is pretty easy to understand. Does it matter what position the knob is in when you start and does it matter if you turn it left or right?

ajstrider
May 17th, 2011, 05:45 PM
The first responder had some good things to say, I would like to try and add some advice on to that. The nock receiver on the Bitz was made way back for older style nocks, and newer nocks fit very sloppily in the receiver. Zenith Archery (google them) makes a nock upgrade for the Bitz that helps make it more precise. I recommend it if you are trying to make better arrow fletching jobs. I adjusted and played with my Bitz jig a lot to get the proper fitting for my arrows, swapping arrows will sometimes require adjustment depending on the amount of different in diameter and such. Like if you put a big offset on a large diameter arrow, and stick a smaller diameter arrow on there, you might find that the vane doesn't completely contact the arrow shaft without making an adjustment.

practice-more
May 17th, 2011, 06:36 PM
Thanks! The way you put it is pretty easy to understand. Does it matter what position the knob is in when you start and does it matter if you turn it left or right?

If you are using an arrow that you can turn the nock on, then no, it doesn't matter what position the indexer knob is in when you start. You can just turn the nock to line it up when you are done fletching.
You will need to turn the knob "top towards you" or counter-clockwise if you are looking at if from the back. This will rotate the fletching you just put on out away from the jig.

Mitch

Deezlin
May 18th, 2011, 08:31 AM
If you are using an arrow that you can turn the nock on, then no, it doesn't matter what position the indexer knob is in when you start. You can just turn the nock to line it up when you are done fletching.
You will need to turn the knob "top towards you" or counter-clockwise if you are looking at if from the back. This will rotate the fletching you just put on out away from the jig.

Mitch


Thanks for the first posting. I thought I knew everything about the jig. I see I do not. Makes me want to go fletch some arrows. I don't think they instructions are that great.

I agree that you can do this, but I don't like too. Why? Well, because if you want to just refletch on vane, you can not. If you order a TM receiver from Bitz or since I am a dealer ,I gernerally just order my fletchers from Bitz. Unfortunately, they don't take credit cards. I don't understand why they want to ship common fletching jigs with cock feather on the side. There are just a whole bunch more release shooters anymore.

Stubby'smom
May 18th, 2011, 12:13 PM
If you are using an arrow that you can turn the nock on, then no, it doesn't matter what position the indexer knob is in when you start. You can just turn the nock to line it up when you are done fletching.
You will need to turn the knob "top towards you" or counter-clockwise if you are looking at if from the back. This will rotate the fletching you just put on out away from the jig.

Mitch

Ok because yes, I can turn my nocks. I am using pin nocks. I have been turning the knob to the left. I usually tune my arrows to the best of my ability after fletching by shooting each arrow 30 or more times at the same target to see where it hits and then adjust my nocks accordingly. With these last arrows I just can't get the results I want. I also didn't think to change settings when I went from fat arrows to skinny ones. All other arrows were fat and while the 22's are not skinny, they are not the logs that the xxx's are.
I'll look into the nock fit suggestion too. Thanks! My arrows are fletched currently with each vane about a inch forward of the other vane. I can still off set this correct? Cock vane is the furthest forward and is placed to the outside. I am shooting a limbdriver.

IGluIt4U
May 18th, 2011, 01:10 PM
Do yourself a favor and look hard at Joe's (Zenith Archery's) upgrade kit for the Bitz.. the design is pretty much unchanged in a long time and the one shortcoming they have is today's arrows, nocks, vanes are much different than they were back in the day when the Bitz was designed. His upgrade kit will work far better for pin nocks, skinny and fat arrows and all the things that are different in today's arrows.

You can tweak the tension on the ball and spring to get more consistent nock/vane alignment to a point, but the Zenith nock receiver is hands down, the best thing that ever happened to a Bitz and well worth the investment.. :nod: :wink:

Here is a link to his website, just scroll down a bit on the homepage.... http://zenitharchery.com/home.htm

Stubby'smom
May 20th, 2011, 03:54 PM
Thanks for all the tips!

Stubby'smom
May 20th, 2011, 08:21 PM
Ok, so I am playing with the jig. Is it ok to fletch both off set and staggered? If you fletch staggered, should the fletchings be straight?

practice-more
May 20th, 2011, 08:30 PM
There is no problem with fletching offset and staggered, just make sure you do a dry fit of the vanes in the most forward and most rearward position to make sure you get a full foot contact. If you are using say a 2" vane and staggering forward 1/2" each time, it would be like setting the jig so a 3" vane would get good contact front to back.

If you have too much offset your most rearward vane may get a full contact to the shaft but as your farther forward you may loose contact on the front right corner, or visa-versa. I usually try to get as much offset as I can and still get good contact on the entire foot.

Mitch

Stubby'smom
May 20th, 2011, 09:05 PM
Ok cool! I did one arrow and I think I'm going to mark it, shoot it for awhile and compare it to the rest of them to see what happens. If I like it I will redo them all. Because you see what I ended up coming back to is VERY close to what I originally had. If I didn't gain anything with arrow flight at least I gained knowledge of fletching and how my jig operates! Well, maybe I should do a couple more to have a group of them exactly the same for sure.