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Vortex 2
March 1st, 2005, 08:24 PM
Here are some pieces of info I picked up from AT over time and thought I would share them here. I have many and will post them as I have time.
First one:

Creep Tuning How To
This method will work on any two-cam bow. I will not work on single cams because you cannot "sync" the cam with the top wheel. If you perform the test on a single cam, what you see is what you get.

You may be able to minimize the effects by adjusting the positioning of the cam, but you cannot cure it. This applies to all single cam, and Darton style cams.

If you have a two cam here is what you need to do to adjust your wheel timing perfectly.

The Creep Tune procedure is as follows:

1. Set the timing as close as you can by eye (you don't have put a micrometer on it; just get as close as you can)

2. Sight your bow in at twenty yards.

3. Put a piece of masking tape on your target butt horizontally. In a pinch, you can use the top edge of a target face.

4. Pull your bow into the wall as hard as you can and shoot arrow #1 at the tape.

On the next shot, creep forward to the front of the valley and shoot arrow #2 at the tape. You make need to re-shoot these shots a couple of times to rule out bad shots.

5. If your bow is in perfect time, both arrows will hit the tape or they will land on the same horizontal plane. (Level with the tape or on the tape)

If the "creep" shot hits HIGH, TIGHTEN or SHORTEN the cable that connects to the BOTTOM cam.
If the "creep" shot hits LOW, TIGHTEN or SHORTEN the cable that connects to the TOP cam.

Make very small, one or two turn, adjustments a time. A little twist goes a long way. You can fine-tune your timing by repeating the test at forty yards. If you make an adjustment at this distance do not turn your cable more that a half a turn at a time. Too much adjustment at this distance can send an arrow over the target butt or in the dirt. When you have completed the test, your bow will be in perfect time, and given that your other accessories are adjusted properly, your bow is as accurate as it can possibly be.
Here is the basic rundown on how it works and where it came from
A guy named Dennis Sullivan developed this method in the early days of the compound. I don’t know if he was the only inventor of this or not but I know that he stumbled on it himself. He showed it to me years ago, and presented it to me as “the big Pro’s secret” to accuracy with a compound. It proved to be just that. It raised my scores tremendously. So I have been using it for years to time customer’s bows. I have used it on every brand, make and model.

Four wheel and six wheel compounds had no wall or even a stop that you could watch at full draw. Many of the manufacturers put timing marks on the wheels so you could check the timing. Other than that, you just had to take your best guess. So we learned to shoot it in.

When your bow is out of time, your nock takes an angled path through the draw cycle. Because of that angled path, depending on where the nock starts, the shot will hit higher or lower. By introducing a mistake, dramatically over-drawing and under-drawing the bow, we can cause a difference in the point of impact. The top cam or the bottom would dominate the nock travel and cause a miss.

Shooters may notice that their top cam appears to be slightly advanced after the test is completed. This is normal because you can’t hold your bow in the exact middle and shoot the arrow through the exact middle at the same time. The amount of cam advancement depends on grip angle (the higher the wrist, the closer the arrow can be shot to the pivot), grip placement in the bow, and how high the arrow is shot above the grip. Just make both arrows hit the line and forget it.

This test tunes the bow to your body style and your unique interaction with the bow. It cannot be done in a machine and still be perfect in your hands. There is no way that a machine can duplicate the dynamic tension of an archer in the bow. Spot Hogg makes the best machine but it is still not a perfect match.

This test is part of my basic setup routine. Anytime I have a high/low problem I go back to the test. I have found that it not only makes my bow shoot where the sight is, but it also makes it steadier and smoother to shoot. The only bow style that will give you a bad test is the single cam. Nock travel is inherent in the system and can be minimized but not eliminated because the cams are not the same shape and their rotation around their axes a not the same.

Vortex 2
March 1st, 2005, 08:28 PM
PAPER TUNING
Paper tuning will work for all styles of shooting. As you are going through these steps keep in mind that paper tuning is not chiseled in stone as the law of archery. It is a guideline for clean arrow flight. Many shooters find that their setup groups best when achieving less than perfect tuning results. For example, some target shooters set their bows to tear slightly high through the paper. They feel this makes their arrow flight less likely to be influenced by outside variables like wind or rain and helps arrow clearance when using a shoot-around type rest such as a blade or pan type launcher.
To begin paper tuning, set up a frame or rack with paper suspended from the frame. Position the frame far enough away from your backstop so the arrow can completely clear the paper. Stand about ten feet from the paper and make sure your arrow is level as it flies through the paper. Fire a test shot and read the results. Compare the holes you have made in the paper to the diagrams below. Procedures for correcting the tear are listed next to each diagram. Please note that tuning procedures recommended for finger shooting often differ from those used for release shooting. You will find that the arrow spine reaction is different for fingers and release, therefore, the procedures for correcting the different disturbances vary. Follow the instructions carefully for your particular shooting style.



High Tear (fletching tears above point)
This tear may signal:
•Nocking point too high.
Lower the nocking point.
•Improper vane clearance.
See if arrow fletching is hitting the rest.
•Launcher is too stiff (release shooters).
Weaken spring tension or use a more limber launcher.
•Wheels may be out of time.
Check wheel timing.
•Arrow may be too limber
Select a stiffer arrow shaft.
•Tiller adjustment may be incorrect.
See basic setup section page 7.
•Irregular or inconsistent shooting form.
See a qualified archery coach or professional and have them check your technique.



Low Tear (fletching tears below point)
This tear may signal:
•Nocking point too low.
Raise the nocking point.
•Wheels may be out of time.
Check wheel timing.
•Tiller adjustment may be incorrect.
See basic setup section on page 7.
•Irregular or inconsistent shooting form.
See a qualified archery coach or professional and have them check your technique.



Right Tear (fletching tears to the right of point)
This tear may signal:
Note: If you are left handed follow these instructions in reverse.

FINGERS:
•Stiff arrow.
This problem is cured using the following methods:
a. Increase peak weight.
b. Use a heavier point.
c. Select a more limber arrow.
d. Lighten cushion plunger tension, or use a weaker spring on shoot around rests.
e. Make small incremental rest adjustments towards the bow.

RELEASE:
•Arrow rest is too far to the right.
Move arrow rest to the left.

EITHER STYLE:
•Too much pressure on the cable guard.
Rotate cable guard for minimum fletching clearance.
•Irregular or inconsistent shooting form.
See a qualified archery coach or professional and have them check your technique.
•Clearance problem.
See that arrow has adequate fletching clearance.



Left Tear (fletching tears left of point)
This tear may signal:
Note: If you are left handed follow these instructions in reverse.

FINGERS:
•Weak arrow or a clearance problem.
This problem is cured using these methods:
a. Reduce bow weight.
b. Use a lighter point.
c. Select a stiffer arrow.
d. Increase cushion plunger tension or use a stiffer spring on shoot around rests.
e. Make small incremental rest adjustments away from the bow .

RELEASE:
•Arrow rest is too far to the left.
Move the arrow rest to the right.
•Arrow is too stiff.
Decrease bow weight or select a weaker arrow.

EITHER STYLE:
•Arrow is not properly clearing cables.
Rotate cable guard for minimum fletching clearance.
•Irregular or inconsistent shooting form.
See a qualified archery coach or professional and have them check your technique.
•Clearance Problem.
See that arrow has adequate fletching clearance.



Multidirectional Tear
This tear may signal:
•More than one problem with accessory adjustment.
Move nock adjustment first until the tear is horizontal and follow instructions for horizontal tear.
•Clearance Problem.
See that the arrow has adequate fletching clearance.
•Wheels may be out of time.
Check wheel timing.
•Irregular or inconsistent shooting form.
See a qualified archery coach or professional and have them check your technique.



Perfect Hole
This pattern shows clean arrow flight. The point and fletching
impacted the same location. Your bow is now ready to shoot or you may want to continue and try some of the super fine tuning methods.
After Adjusting
After you have completed these steps and have achieved good paper test results, it is best to try it at fifteen and twenty feet just to make sure you did not get a false reading. A good rule to go by when paper tuning is to move your nock point or arrow rest opposite the tear when using a release. In some rare cases if this does not clear up your tear you may need to move your accessories in the same direction as the tear.
SuperFine Tuning

SHORT RANGE GROUP TUNING
Short range group tuning will work with any style of shooting. Best results are achieved when this method is used after completing the Bare Shaft Planing or Paper Tuning tests. This is a good ultra fine tuning method when space will not permit long range shooting. After completing the following steps you will have very clean arrow flight and a well tuned, accurate setup.
To begin the short range tuning method, you will need a piece of cardboard, or a target face will do nicely. Make a broad line through the center of the paper on the blank side, making sure the line is thick enough to see from twenty yards. Start at about 10 to 15 yards from the target. Use your tuning target and position the line vertically when you are tuning the arrow rest and position the line horizontally when you are tuning the nock point.


Vertical Impact
Position your line horizontally and shoot six arrows at the line. Concentrate on keeping your pin on the line. Don’t worry about left and right hits, just try to keep your shots on the line. Shoot two good groups, discarding any rough or bad shots, and note the vertical impact of the arrows and their relationship to the line. All adjustments are made with the nock point during these steps.
If your arrows are not consistently grouping on the line, make small 1/32" adjustments up or down with the nock point and shoot two more groups. Continue making nock adjustments in small increments. If all of your arrows begin to hit on the line you are correcting the nock position. In the event that your groups widen, move your nock back to its original location and make small adjustments in the opposite direction.


Horizontal Impact
After achieving a nice, straight, horizontal pattern, rotate your target so your line will appear vertical. Just as before, shoot two good groups, discarding any rough or bad shots, and note the horizontal impact of the arrows and their relationship to the line. All adjustments are made with the arrow rest during these steps.
If your arrows are not consistently grouping on the line, make small 1/32" adjustments left or right with the arrow rest and shoot two more groups. Continue making rest adjustments in small increments. If all of your arrows begin to hit on the line you are correcting the rest position. In the event that your groups widen move your rest back to its original location and make small adjustments in the opposite direction.

FLIGHT TUNING BROADHEADS
Broadhead tuning will work for all styles of shooting. After you have completed one or more of the tuning procedures described in this manual, you can proceed with this final test to get your new bow ready to hunt. You will need three fletched arrows with field tips and three with broadheads that weigh the same as your field tips.
Before you begin shooting, you will need to check your broadhead equipped arrows. After installing your broadheads, make sure they are perfectly straight on the shaft. This can be done by spinning the arrow on a flat counter while checking for any broadhead wobble. You can also use a commercially made spin check tool that is available from your dealer. After all of your broad heads are spin-checked and straight you are ready to begin.
Set up a broadhead target at twenty or thirty yards and shoot three arrows with field tips. Make sure you are properly warmed up and you are shooting to the best of your ability. Next, shoot three identically aimed arrows with broadheads. WARNING: NEVER SHOOT BARE SHAFTS WITH BROADHEADS ATTACHED. THE FLIGHT WILL BE EXTREMELY UNPREDICTABLE AND DANGEROUS. Once you have shot the best group you can shoot, compare the position of the broadhead group to the field tip group. Compare the groups to the diagram below and make very small incremental adjustments as described next to the broadhead group that corresponds to your arrow pattern. Note: make very small 1/32" adjustments. A small adjustment will greatly change your broadhead flight.

jamestheron
March 1st, 2005, 08:29 PM
Sticky

Vortex 2
March 1st, 2005, 08:32 PM
Tiller Tuning Your Compound Bow
Tiller tuning your bow is the process by which you get your wheels to turn at optimum performance. You do this by shooting groups of arrows at several targets until your arrows shoot the best group.

Step #1) Measure tuning - Using an arrow, place the point of the arrow on the inside of the bow at a point where the riser and limb meet for the top limb. Holding the arrow, use your thumb to measure the distance to the string. Holding that position on the arrow with your thumb, measure the bottom limb/riser intersection to the string. If the string touches your thumb in exactly the same spot, your wheels are in-time with each other; hint, use the tip of your thumb. If your thumb does not touch the string in exactly the same spot, then turn the limb bolt in or out as needed. Some people choose to stop here; they assume that the bow is tuned and it will shoot tight groups. If you want tighter groups, continue on to step #2.

Step #2) Draw your crosshairs - On the bolt that holds your limbs to the riser, draw a cross over the bolt and onto the limb. Use a straight edge or ruler; it is important that these lines measure out a perfect cross. This cross can be thought of as a cross hair or a guide. Each time you begin to shoot at a target, you will turn the limb either in or out based on the position of the cross hair. In your mind (or on your bow, which ever you prefer) label the end points of the cross hairs 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, and 1. These numbers represent turns on the limb; example, 1/4 turn, 1/2 turn, etc.

Step #3) Select a distance that you are confident with shooting tight groups
Note: On the target displayed below you see nine targets; four on top, one in the middle, and four on the bottom. The four on top are for your top limb, the four on the bottom are for your bottom limb, and the one in the middle is for recentering. Start with center target.
Note: Use either 3 or 4 arrows - any more and you will break knocks, feathers, and possibly robin hood an arrow.
Shoot a group at the center target. Retrieve your arrows and note the group. If its dead center, that's great! However, we're not looking for accuracy, we're looking for tight groups.
Note: Take breaks from shooting often, I recommend after each group shot. If your arms are tired from shooting you'll waste your time.



Step #4) On your top limb, turn the limb bolt in (not out) to the 1/4 position. Shoot a group. Retrieve your arrows and note the group.

Step #5) On your top limb, turn the limb bolt in (not out) to the 1/2 position. Shoot a group. Retrieve your arrows and note the group.

Step #6) Continue this process for positions 3/4 and 1.

Step #7) Return the top limb to its original position.
Shoot a group at the center target and note the position. It should be at the same place it was.

Step #8) Repeat the top limb process (steps #4 thru 7) for the bottom limb on the four bottom targets. Don't forget to note each group shot and take breaks often.

Step #9) Compare your Targets - After you have returned the bottom limb to its original position and shot the center target a third time (it should have shot in the same position as the first two - if it didn't, you messed up somewhere), compare your targets. Select the one that you shot your tightest grouping. Now, set either your top limb or your bottom limb according to that grouping position. Congrats, your wheels are in tune with each other. Now, sight your bow in. Remember, timing and tuning are two different beasts. A bow can be timed and not tuned.

fastfire
March 1st, 2005, 08:37 PM
Vortex 2,
I would like to add to what you posted here on creep tuning.
When shooting from the valley mark the cams to the limbs & have your better half or a friend watch so that you shoot from the same point in the valley each time.
If you adjust your bow then remark & repeat.
I found that this helped take some of i'm not sure out of creep tuning.

Vortex 2
March 1st, 2005, 08:37 PM
View From Behind The String - EZ Tuning for Finger Shooters - by Art Champoux
There are a lot of excellent articles for tuning bows but most relate to tuning for release shooters. Some times comprehensive archery books you can find an area that relates to finger shooting set up. While I have tried several ways to tune for me this is the easiest. I will relate this to you the easiest way that I know how. Remember though there are many factors that one must consider. A list of these would include; Proper arrow spine, right arrow length, weight of point or broad head, length of bow, hand placement and do not forget a clean release. What I am going to describe is going to be applied to the shooting of a compound bow. Most bows today are cut past center and that makes life easier. What you will need is this: Your bow, arrow rest w/side pressure and vertical movement, a Golden Key enter gauge and a set of allen wrenches along with an arrow. With this equipment you can tune your bow in perhaps a half-hour of shooting.
Go to your local archery shop and ask for a good finger shooting rest. Golden Key makes several. The Huntmaster 2000 is an excellent choice. New Archery products center plunger rest, Tiger Tough Deluxe star or the Cavalier Free Flight all are good choices. Install these per manufacturer instructions. A few things to watch for: make sure the arrow, when placed on the rest covers the plunger hole and/ or the plunger/ side pressure plate goes between the fletching as the arrow passes. Next: install a peep into the string, there is no need to tie it in as yet. To adjust the rest: plunger for center shot use the center gauge. Place the arrow in the rest and using the gauge you can see if the front end of the arrow is lined up left or right of the arrow sitting on the string. If not you an move the plunger, or the rest until the tip of the arrow is lined up perfectly with the string.
Now you can look at the bow from behind and see if the string bisects thew arrow from back to front, doing so the peep should be over the center of the arrow about half way down the shaft. If not, adjust side tension or move the rest accordingly. Depending on the finger pressure as you shoot or the placement of your hand on the grip this might change but now we have a starting point. Let us see this from the pictures angle. The string dissects the middle of the grip. Usually the string is located on the centerline of the grip which is located on the centerline of the bow. Now you are almost ready to shoot. Loosely tie in the peep sight, you might have to change position later. Have someone stand in back of you as you shoot. You should NOT be watching the arrow but your friend or spouse do that. If they see the arrow fishtailing then adjust the rest or plunger until it no longer fishtails. If you are using a plunger DO NOT MOVE THE REST! By increasing or decreasing the plunger tension you can get your arrow to fly straight. You can look at the relationship between front and back end of arrow in the target butt. That also indicates how the arrow is flying. When you are close to a straight flying arrow you can sometimes adjust the flight by turning your limb bolt in half turns either way until you reach the optimum arrow flight.
The weakest link in this is YOU. There is no question that a mechanical release will make you a better shooter. But what if it is broken or lost? What do you do now? If you constantly practice with fingers you can be deadly accurate. Becoming familiar with your equipment will make you a more consistent shooter under bowhunting conditions. Finger shooting is alive and well. Fred Bear did it, Howard Hill did it, Robin Hood did it, Ben Pearson did it, Byron Ferguson shoots arrows through wedding bands at 50 yards using fingers. From the primitive cave man to the twentieth century the bowstring and the fingers can still be used together. There is something special to watch the arrow fly when relaxing your fingers and watching the view from behind the string!
That is how I see it in my "view from the back of the string".

Vortex 2
March 1st, 2005, 08:40 PM
some of the stuff I am posting here has been sitting in my computer for a couple of years. There may be easier or better ways to do things. Post away if you can update anything I have added. More to come.

PLASTIC PAUL
March 5th, 2005, 05:43 PM
This is Good stuff !! I have not always paper tuned but i have always group tuned out to 50yds. Recently i have had to switch to paper tuning because i don't have easy access to a 50yd range. I can honestly say, i think group tuning produces a more forgiving bow and therefore more accurate bow.

sapper1
March 5th, 2005, 06:45 PM
All I can say is THANK YOU. I just got my riser back from being dipped and I started putting everything on it and getting it tuned. During the paper tuning process I was getting a high tear that I just couldn't get rid of. So I took a break and decided to come check out the tuning forum. And there was your post. With just a quick scan I realized what I was doing wrong. I was moving everything in the wrong direction. I moved the rest down and the nocking point up. I have paper tuned before but for the life of me I couldn't figure it out :o .

Thanks