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View Full Version : Is it ok for someone else to paper tune your bow?



TrevorF
March 8th, 2005, 12:56 PM
I'm new to this and just started to shoot my compound for the first time on Sunday. The owner of the pro shop set it up for me, set the draw legth etc and then paper tuned it for me. I was told that I should have done the paper tune myself because we may not hold the bow the same way. Is this true? Now that the bow is tuned should I go a head and paper tune it myself?
Thanks,
Trevor

BradMc26
March 8th, 2005, 01:04 PM
I would say no that you need to do it yourself.

He may have gotten you close, but it kind of like bore sighting a rifle if you ask me. Close just dont cut it.

Download a copy of Eastons tuning guide and give it a go. You learn a lot more by doing it yourself and it is fun.

Good luck.

winter86
March 8th, 2005, 01:04 PM
it'll be pretty close when someone else does it but if you want it perfect than shoot it yourself.

Jorge Oliveira
March 8th, 2005, 01:10 PM
As they said, but since you're just started, wait until you're shooting fine.

It will be worse if you try to tune it as a begginer - you will get mad and possibly make the tune worse.

reflex shooter
March 8th, 2005, 01:15 PM
Agreed, your grip and form need to be good in order for you to be able to tune your bow. My buddy who works in a shop says some newbies will shoot through the paper and get a different tear every time.

hansel
March 8th, 2005, 02:03 PM
You should have been shooting your bow, because your form may not be right, and his might. I've learned over time to set up, and paper tune my own bows, ya it's like working on cars, at first it seems hard or confusing, but after reading, and spending time a the club you pick this stuff up. My 2cents worth. :D

Jeebus Kliest
March 8th, 2005, 02:16 PM
Yes you will need to tune it yourself.

The difference in the tune between me, my father, and my brother is huge. Different release..different form...different anything can affect the tune.

littlebubba
March 8th, 2005, 02:29 PM
Trevor,
One thing you might want to consider. Assuming the person that shot the bow for tuning is experenced. He knows the right grip and correct way to release the shot. Although there is a fine line between right and wrong every person is different. You might want to try shooting threw paper to see if you are doing the right things. When a bow is tuned to shoot a clean hole the bow is real close to perfect. I've had people shoot- I adjust- they shoot again-I adjust and so on. Finally I take the bow and shoot a clean hole. Then the fun starts trying to teach that person how to shoot a bow. There are so many things that can effect that arrow coming off the rest. How you grip the riser, where is your nocking point or how smooth is your release and so on. Like someone said in a earlier post maybe you want to practice with the bow like it is. Also go to someone with experence and let them watch you shoot to be sure that you are doing it right.
My 2 cts.
Bubba.

TrevorF
March 8th, 2005, 10:05 PM
Thanks for the replies guys. Like most of you said I do think I need to shoot it for a while first before messing with it too much. I think it's close though because when I shot it on Sunday for the first time, first time shooting any compound for that matter I made a 256. I'm told that is not bad for a first time compound shooter. Tonight though I was shooting high for some reason.
Thanks again,
Trevor

Stanley
March 9th, 2005, 02:27 PM
Trevor: The fact that you are a new archer tells me you don't have the experience to paper tune. An experienced archer that tunes your bow for you will get it closer than you can. You need to get some shots under your belt, then you can paper tune your own equipment. At this stage of the game, you need to shoot arrows to develop form and skill, and then tune your bow.

TrevorF
March 9th, 2005, 02:33 PM
That seems to be the polpular opinion. But won't I shoot better with a well tuned bow?
Thanks,
Trevor

Archersteve
March 9th, 2005, 03:35 PM
That seems to be the polpular opinion. But won't I shoot better with a well tuned bow?
Thanks,
Trevor

The bow will be more forgiving, but until you have shot a lot more it won't make that much difference. I assume your score was on a Blue face NFAA target. If that is so, than when you can shoot an average score of about 280, consider it time to work on fine tuning your bow for your new skills. :D

NJDiverDan
March 9th, 2005, 03:36 PM
If some one else sets it up, at least shoot a couple through the paper yourself to make sure you are getting the same. I have a fairly unique issue in that my draw is 33", and most shop techs cannot hit the stop on my bow, therefore they can never tune it properly. Funny to watch them try to shoot it though with the nock behind their ear.

-dan

Archersteve
March 9th, 2005, 03:41 PM
If some one else sets it up, at least shoot a couple through the paper yourself to make sure you are getting the same. I have a fairly unique issue in that my draw is 33", and most shop techs cannot hit the stop on my bow, therefore they can never tune it properly. Funny to watch them try to shoot it though with the nock behind their ear.

-dan

You have a unique problem, but remember that even a moderately tuned bow will shoot quite well indoors. I still say get the experience before you create un-needed head problems trying to deal with issues he is not ready for.

After all, would we have him doing creep tuning at this stage? What about 3rd axis adjustments? Let him learn line upon line, precept upon precept, here a little and there a little. :D

Tafkas
March 9th, 2005, 05:59 PM
You can't shoot well with an untuned bow.

You can't tune a bow unless you can shoot well.

Let them set up the bow for you. Then spend a day standing in front of the paper tuner trying to shoot bullett holes. Now you know the bow can do it since your friend tuned it for you. What's missing from this equation? Good "blank bale" practice for a newbie. Try it, you'll learn a lot.

ftshooter
March 9th, 2005, 09:28 PM
One way for me to make myself do something is to set goals ..Shoot the 280 a few times use that as a goal.You will lean a lot just from shooting.then look at leaning how to tune a bow..There are some easy and good steps to take and when your ready look at them.. Martinarchery.com has good stuff on about bow tuning . also, the easton guide is good..

wvbuckhunter
March 9th, 2005, 11:02 PM
Absolutely tune it yourself.Its not a shotgun It will not shoot the same for you as it will someone lse ( in most cases )

alwinearcher
March 10th, 2005, 03:03 PM
You can't shoot well with an untuned bow.

You can't tune a bow unless you can shoot well.

Let them set up the bow for you. Then spend a day standing in front of the paper tuner trying to shoot bullett holes. Now you know the bow can do it since your friend tuned it for you. What's missing from this equation? Good "blank bale" practice for a newbie. Try it, you'll learn a lot.

Im not so sure about thats first statement, It is true a bow will shoot better when tuned good, but paper tuning isnt the end all of tuning, If i remember right, several years back someone shot a unheard of score in a pro calls at some shoot, his arrows look like they were flying to the target side ways, so after he got done kicking everyones butt, they talked him into shooting the bow through paper, he had a massive tear and nobody could believe he won with a bow that wasnt paper tuned.

I think If i was a new archer I would rather have someone with more experiance paper tune my bow. Paper tuning is done to find proper center shot, and if you dont know how to grip a bow correctly then you will torque it, and if thats the case, when you finaly do tune it to a bullet hole, your center shot will NOT be correct whereas it would be if done by someone with the know how.

fatboy111
March 10th, 2005, 07:35 PM
I have tuned many, many bows for people who where inconsistent in gripping the bow. I tuned it for them and they shot broadheads just fine. There is no doubt that eventually you would like the bow tuned to you. But, get the basics down and let someone else tune it for you to get you going. Have fun and enjoy the sport, that's what it's all about.

TrevorF
March 10th, 2005, 10:02 PM
Thanks for all the replies guys.
Well the first time I shot it, first time shooting a compound period was on Sunday and I scored a 245. Today was the third time and I scored a 252. My first three rounds were 25. My lowest was 23 and my best was 29, last round go figure. My groups for the most part were nice and tight so I guess all I can do now is let my poor shoulder muscles rest and keep practicing. When I've had a few weeks in I'll try a paper test my self. I've got a copy of the easton tuning guide and I've been going through it bit by bite trying to make sense of it.
Cheers,
Trevor