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IMN23D
March 17th, 2005, 06:30 PM
With all the talk about having correct spine..... how to you find it (having a true back tension release with string loop)? Some people will say by paper tune. Others say paper tune is worthless. Some say bare shaft test. But, all the written material says it's for finger release. Some will say by the charts or by the computer programs. Others say they just use the charts as a starting point. Group tune? You can make all the adjustments to nock height and center shot so your shot is as accurate as that arrow will allow, but, you still don't if it is the correct spine where it will make a tighter group. Walkback? Lots of arguements against it. I don't think everyone has enough cash to buy all the arrow and point weight combiniations to do a trial and error. So, how does one fine the correct spine?

Fog123
March 17th, 2005, 06:41 PM
It seems you can't go wrong if you go a little stiffer than recommended. An under spined arrow is unstable and unpredictable. Where as a stiff arrow will act the same every time. Hope this helps.

archerycenter
March 17th, 2005, 06:50 PM
In all the years that I have been bowhunting, shooting and setting up bows in my retail archery shop, I have never put that much thought into arrow spine. I look it up on a chart, set up the bow and shoot it. The hard work has been done for you by the arrow manufacterer. All of this talk about "equipment" has gotten way to out of hand. Pick a bassic settup, and learn how to "shoot" your bow. You'll get alot further with your form than you will nit picking your equipment.

A friend of mine by the name of Terry Ragsdale shot the first perfect round in Vages using a bow that was severely out of tune.

Aim hard, hold steady, shoot straight.

Out.

JAVI
March 17th, 2005, 07:10 PM
In all the years that I have been bowhunting, shooting and setting up bows in my retail archery shop, I have never put that much thought into arrow spine. I look it up on a chart, set up the bow and shoot it. The hard work has been done for you by the arrow manufacterer. All of this talk about "equipment" has gotten way to out of hand. Pick a bassic settup, and learn how to "shoot" your bow. You'll get alot further with your form than you will nit picking your equipment.

A friend of mine by the name of Terry Ragsdale shot the first perfect round in Vages using a bow that was severely out of tune.

Aim hard, hold steady, shoot straight.

Out.

Yes he did..... but that's at 20 yards... and only one distance... you better tune if you want to shoot multiple distances.... I've shot great scores at 20 yards with my arrows fishtailing for the first 10... but shot like ..... at 80 yards until I tuned the bow and properly spined the arrow...

IMN23D
March 18th, 2005, 07:04 AM
Ok........ I've got one "stiff arrow is better than an under spined arrow". Well.... how do you tell?

Everyone says how important it is to have a correct spined arrow, but no one can tell me how to tell if it's correct??????

Doesn't anyone know?????? Or, isn't it as important as everyone says?

jduck1
March 18th, 2005, 11:01 AM
The only way I know is when you paper tune. I am sure there are more but I am new to all this also. I am going through some of the same thinking on my future set up. I am waiting for a new Allegiance to arrive. On all the different makes of arrows each chart gives me a couple spine choices as I am right on the boarder with each. Was wondering which to get. Looks like some say stiff is better others say don't worry???? :confused: :confused:

JAVI
March 18th, 2005, 11:04 AM
There are several ways to find the correct spine for your setup... the problem is that no matter which method or methods you might choose to use, someone will tell you that you are an idiot for doing it that way...

Bobmuley
March 18th, 2005, 11:14 AM
There are several ways to find the correct spine for your setup... the problem is that no matter which method or methods you might choose to use, someone will tell you that you are an idiot for doing it that way... Don't listen to them. Let your results dictate that you're doing it right.

I think thats the real difference between my spot/field and 3D setups. For the field setup I want the arrow spined right. For 3D I try to see what I can get away with.

heavyarrow
March 18th, 2005, 12:28 PM
So is it safe to say that with a bit of adjusting and tuning, one could get acceptable results at different arrow spines?
Meaning-shooting a slightly underspined arrow would require your tweaking need you rest set at "a", your nock at "b" and your sights at "c".
Shooting a mid range spine requires maybe settings of x, y, and z
and shooting a over spined arrow requires settings of d,e,f.

Does that make sense?

JAVI
March 18th, 2005, 12:36 PM
Basically what happens is this….

For a right-handed archer shooting a release aid, an under-spined arrow will require the rest to be outside the centershot of the bow, and an over-spined arrow will require the rest to be inside the centershot.

The degree of misalignment is an indication of the severity of deviation from correct spine.

Of course this analogy depends on the archers ability or lack thereof to shoot a torque free shot.

The ideal situation of correct arrow spine will result in a more efficient bow/arrow combination, which will manifest a faster arrow with less down range loss of speed and momentum.

Jabwa
March 19th, 2005, 04:02 AM
I agree with Jave. Setup your centershot as perfect as possible, also a perfectly level arrow (i.e. perpendicular to string on cam.5 or dually). Paper shoot and if it tears left or right, you probably have the wrong spine. Another clue to poorly spined arrows is a sight pin which is way left or way right of your arrow. Mine always (do I dare say it?) line up just to the left of the centerline of the arrow (I am right handed). If you start out by choosing a slightly stiff arrow from a chart, then leave it 2-3" longer than the chart says, you can cut off 1/4" at a time until the paper tear is eliminated. You can also use a bare shaft test. You can also group test using a vertical, then a horizontal line. The important thing is to leave the shaft too long on purpose, and then gradually cut it down until you get the right spine. Point weight is not a significant factor. It takes a very large change in point weight to change spine just a little. Do this with only 3 arrows in a dozen and if you cut it too short, you still have 9 arrows left! When you get close, a small change in peak weight of the bow can be used to get the perfect spine. It is important also to realize that all this assumes your bow is not "screwed up" (a general term which covers things like bent axles, cracked spacers, twisted limbs and risers, cams out of time, weird tiller differences, bad arrow clearance, and many other problems that no one has ever seen or heard of). It is also assumed that the archer's form has developed a consistency such that several consecutive shots through paper will show the same tear, and that the archer is capable of shooting tight groups consistently. Sounds kind of like a catch 22 doesn't it? How can I shoot tight groups if my arrows are improperly spined? That's what makes archery fun :D :D
All this may sound time consuming, but once you get it right, buying new arrows is easy since you know exactly the correct ones to buy. Makes you wonder why people buy a new bow every year when they have to go through this time consuming process for each new bow:D :D

tdaward
March 19th, 2005, 06:35 PM
FOG123 is right about starting a little stiff. If you realize you are too stiff add point weight. This will weaken the spine and increase your FOC, an added plus. If this added weight hurts you to bad at long ranges you can switch to a lower spine/lower point weight....I found that the Easton arrow charts run stiff for me, so I'de say start there.