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Feral Donkey
November 29th, 2005, 04:10 PM
Look at this. Anyone ever seen anything like this? It almost looks like one of those fancy Oneida bows.

http://cgi.ebay.com/Amazing-Sporting-RECURVE-BOW-57-High_W0QQitemZ7199508402QQcate goryZ20839QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Viper1
November 29th, 2005, 05:19 PM
FD -

No, I've never seen that before, but it seems like the bowyer is using those "prongs" to either limit the limb travel to exagerate the distal half of the limb's action and so pick up speed, or if they are "spring loaded", to give the limbs an extra push.

Cute idea.

Viper1 out.

DwayneR
November 29th, 2005, 05:33 PM
Hello Viper,

I also thought about a variable poundage Recurve... Kinda like cranking down those screws on the limbs to vary the poundage between 60 and 70 pounds... With the prongs like that, the chances of limb fatique would seem to be less apt to over tighten. I would think that cranking the limbs would be easier than the way we do it nowadays. More leverage with prongs like that.

Dwayne

Viper1
November 29th, 2005, 05:41 PM
Dwayne -

I actually didn't think about variable weights, but that's certainly a possibility. I was thinking by placing a hard stop in the mid limb, you'd be forcing the limb's flexing geometry to change, so that you'd effectively be getting a tighter arc in the distal limb and bowing in the proximal limb, so you get faster acceleration, and theoretically a smoother draw, hence the compound limb action. Don't know.

If it were just weight adjustment, that could be done as it is with FITA bows, by just adjusting the reflex/deflex of the limb root.

Curious design, hope some one comes around who knows what it really is.

Viper1 out.

DwayneR
November 29th, 2005, 06:27 PM
Hello Viper,

Viper>>I actually didn't think about variable weights, but that's certainly a possibility. I was thinking by placing a hard stop in the mid limb, you'd be forcing the limb's flexing geometry to change, so that you'd effectively be getting a tighter arc in the distal limb and bowing in the proximal limb, so you get faster acceleration, and theoretically a smoother draw, hence the compound limb action. Don't know. <<

Yes, I thought about this too...but since you mentioned it...I didn't go furhter on this idea.

Viper >>If it were just weight adjustment, that could be done as it is with FITA bows, by just adjusting the reflex/deflex of the limb root.<<

Yes, I understand, but the amount of pressure these OB have on that screw is tremendous. The Fulcrum<sp> is only about 2 to 3 inches max. The the screws are taking a severe stress. (Granted the bows are designed to handle it <g>)

That bow though...the Fulcrum<sp> is probably 12 inches or more? meaning the stress on the limb bolts is much less than the Risers of today. This was the idea that came to me while studying it a second time.

Viper>>Curious design, hope some one comes around who knows what it really is.<<

Yes, totally agree... It would be neat to have the designer answer that one!

Also, when looking at the picture, is that a pully system I see in the Riser??? What is the purpose of that? To work like that Oneida bow? a timing system? Or maybe I am seeing things... I can't tell for sure.

Dwayne

Feral Donkey
November 29th, 2005, 06:47 PM
It looks to be the same setup as the Oneida bow exept the moving parts are away from the operator and the Oneida hardware is towards the operator. This one also seems to have both pulleys linked together with a cable looping through the riser. Now that I'm looking at the Oneida closer, it apears to do so as well. Well, it's a lot cheaper than an Oneida.

That thing is just strange. Neat idea. It's 57" long so that's a step in the right direction. If I won the lottery I'd just buy it just to see what the heck it is.

I tried a Yahoo search on Amazing Sporting RECURVE BOW and came up with nothing. I'll try Google once.

LBR
November 30th, 2005, 02:23 AM
The closest thing I've seen to it was at the old Howard Hill shoot in Wilsonville, AL umpteen years ago. There was a fellow there selling recurves with removeable "helper limbs"--little bitty limbs you could attach that upped the poundage. That was the only time I ever saw one--guess they didn't go over too well.

Does that one have let-off? Interesting piece anyhow.

Chad

Rathbuck
November 30th, 2005, 09:25 AM
Guys,

This was the very, very original Oneida Eagle bow, before it was really even called Oneida.

They have one at their headquarters in Marion, MI - one of their employees showed it to me last summer when I was up there. Needless to say, the design has been radically changed since then. :teeth:

Bow is pretty rare - don't see too many of them around.

Feral Donkey
November 30th, 2005, 11:03 AM
That makes sense. I did searches on it last night for about an hour and a half and came up with nothing. It's up to $65 now. I don't supose it's easy to find parts for it.

jgbennett6
November 30th, 2005, 11:16 AM
i thought their headquarters were in oneida NY, hence the Oneida bows, where they are made.

robk
November 30th, 2005, 08:52 PM
yes i saw one of those one time i believe. it was at a shop that isn't aroudn any more and a guy came in with one and asked if we could help him out and buy it he needed money. the owner wasn't interested and the guy wanted way to much money for it. in hind sight it may of been a mistake to buy it as it is an unusual piece of equipment and could be a great conversation piece
rob k

Rathbuck
December 1st, 2005, 09:59 AM
i thought their headquarters were in oneida NY, hence the Oneida bows, where they are made.

Yes, you're correct, the headquarters were located in NY (Fulton) when the company first started. Due to management problems and quality control issues, the company almost went out of business years ago. Claude Pollington stepped in and bought the company and moved the operations to his machine shop in Northern MI (I'd have to check the year) - a very small town called Marion, MI. The name was changed to CP Oneida - CP obviously being Claude's initials.

Claude's son Matt has one of these bows, and pulled it out to show it to me last summer. He described it to me as the precursor to the first Oneida - there were some major changes before the first major "run" of bows, the H-250.

I can give a more detailed history, if desired...:teeth:

jgbennett6
December 1st, 2005, 10:46 AM
nope thanks for clearing it up, I had no idea that they had moved out of NY... thanks for the info, they really are nice bows from what i'm told.

Janek
December 1st, 2005, 12:25 PM
Guys, I tell you, I would shoot this bow only in full plated armor. It looks like unsrewed limbs. On the first look the screws will brake on the first shoot. Maybe poundage is low and bow press is not needed to unstring and someone put all parts together only for taking the picture?
Janek