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View Full Version : Tough old squirrel, what to do?



Airhead
December 17th, 2006, 09:39 AM
I killed 3 Fox Squirrels yesterday, I par boiled them in chicken broth. 2 turned out fine, nice and tender, the third was tough as a tire.

I put the old hag back in the pot for another hour, still very tough.

Any ideas? She's almost too tough to eat.:thumbs_do :thumbs_do

Wolfman88
December 17th, 2006, 10:16 AM
Since you boiled them in chicken broth anyway just pull the meat off the bones with a fork chop it up in small pieces toss it back in the broth. Add seasoning as you desire, add some noodles and veggies and enjoy a nice hot bowl of squirrel soup

Jimmieal1b
December 17th, 2006, 06:40 PM
Try putting it into a slow cooker w/a bottle of bbq sauce. Cook it on low. All day should do it. Between the heat from the cooking and the acid from the sauce it'll get tender and tasty.

Airhead
December 17th, 2006, 09:41 PM
I'll try the crock pot, need a couple more tough ones to make another meal. LOL!

Might try grinding it for a sandwich spread too.

BTW, got 2 Pine Squirrels today, look pretty tender, not much meat though. Any favorite recipes to share for smaller squrrels?

TC-CountryBoy
December 19th, 2006, 11:35 PM
Jimmie has the right idea, cook them several hours in a slow cooker until the meat falls off the bones, then remove the squirrel and broth and debone the squirrel. Return the meat back to the slow cooker then add your favorite BBQ sauce and sit back and wait, and you won't be sorry.

A few years back, we had some city boys come down from Canada to work where I do, and they swore they would never eat a hairy rat, well after smelling the BBQ squirrel simmering in the slow cooker all morning I talked them into trying it, well they came back for seconds.

As for the small or young sqirrels they can't be beat when fried up along with milk gravy and hot biscuits.

TC

WoolyWelsh
December 21st, 2006, 05:55 PM
Some of the prior posts hit it M.O.T.!

Many years ago, a friend of mine showed me how he cooks wild game. He drops his cooking temp. down to about 225 degrees MAXIMUM, and about doubles his cooking time. You can smell it when it's done.

I have used this technique with goose, duck, and venison, and yes, even store-bought beef. The "tougher" cuts of meat turn out very good.

That's the main idea - lower cooking temps and longer cooking times. The spices and what-not are still worth tossing in, too.

Give 'er a try, gents....maybe it will surprise you. Hmmmm....foxsquirrels....big, fat, tasty morsels if you ask me. I think I'm gonna go tree-climbing. Good luck and good eating! :smile:

camotoe
January 5th, 2007, 07:31 PM
Funny how some turn out tender and others so tough you couldn't get a fork in it's gravy!

Archeryman101
January 19th, 2007, 06:10 PM
You probably think Im crazy...but in the south where I grew up a lot of people eat squirrel brains and scrambled eggs!

GoldenMonkey
January 29th, 2007, 12:40 PM
heres how I usually cook squirrel.

coat the pieces in flour, shake off the excess. salt and pepper them. then brown them in some olive oil till a nice color is on the outside. remove from the pan add some chopped onions and sweat them, then add some fresh garlic. deglaze with some red wine, or beer, or chicken stock. add some good canned tomatoes, fresh herbs, throw the squirrel back in, bring to a boil then let it simmer for a couple of hours until its nice and tender.

TC-CountryBoy
January 30th, 2007, 10:52 PM
Archeryman,
I have a cousin that used to live with me for a while that liked squirrel brains and scrambled eggs as well. He always gave me a hard time for shooting them in the head, he wanted be to rib shoot them so he could have the brains. Using a 22, I wouldn't take a shot if I couldn't see the head.

TC

spoco57
January 31st, 2007, 09:29 AM
We had problems with tough squirrels for years until we hit on the idea of putting them in the pressure cooker. Man, now every squirrel I shoot is as tender as chicken. It totally revitalized my will to kill tree rats... now I can't get enough of them.

If you have a pressure cooker you really have to try this one. You'll never look back.

neandertaler
January 7th, 2009, 07:29 AM
Hi!


[...] If you have a pressure cooker you really have to try this one. You'll never look back.

Could you please provide some details? How long do they have to stay inside of the pressure cooker? At what temperature? How do you know when they are ready?

Do you also use the pressure cooker for other kinds of meat?

Cheers,

Oliver

Airhead
January 7th, 2009, 07:50 PM
We had problems with tough squirrels for years until we hit on the idea of putting them in the pressure cooker. Man, now every squirrel I shoot is as tender as chicken. It totally revitalized my will to kill tree rats... now I can't get enough of them.

If you have a pressure cooker you really have to try this one. You'll never look back.

We do have one! I'll try that too.


Hi!



Could you please provide some details? How long do they have to stay inside of the pressure cooker? At what temperature? How do you know when they are ready?

Do you also use the pressure cooker for other kinds of meat?

Cheers,

Oliver

Hi Oliver.

Pressure cookers are great for all kinds of stuff.

You can cook most anything in about 1/2 the time of baking or stovetop. It's especially suited for tougher cuts that need longer to cook. An hour in a pressure cooker with a small amount of water is like boiling for 2-3 hours. Because much of the water/steam stays in the pot, so does the flavor. It's especially suited for starting stews and soups.

Quality models often come with a cookbook and basic guidlines.

Good luck.

neandertaler
January 8th, 2009, 03:49 AM
@Airhead:

Thanks for the information - I'll try that. :darkbeer:

camoman30
January 19th, 2009, 09:05 PM
squirrl bbq sounds good i will try that.....i usually boil them and make dumplins thats good

hunting170
January 30th, 2009, 12:49 AM
I use Adolph`s Meat Tenderizer on mine. Apply tenderizer, and pierce with a fork. Let it sit for a day, or two, in the refrigerator. Rinse the squirrel off good before cooking. Dip it in buttermilk, then in seasoned flour, and throw it in the skillet. You won`t believe how tender it is.