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View Full Version : Flipper Rest ?



capool
December 31st, 2006, 10:32 AM
Why does a flipper rest tear my bottom feather up. I have turned nock raised and lowered nock point and still after a few shots you can see the bottom feather getting tore up. Is this normal and will it affect flight ?

Unclegus
December 31st, 2006, 11:32 AM
When an arrow leaves the string with a finger release, it cycles horizontally. The ideal situation is that when the fletch passes the rest, the arrow is bent in the cycle so the fletch is away from the rest rather than into the rest. Could be that your arrows are too stiff an the cycle isn't right??? Could be?? Also, is it possible that the feathers are hitting the buss cables and not the rest?? Could be hand torque?? Bow could be slightly out of time... If the bow is for sure in time, and there's no possibility of hitting the buss cables, the first thing I'd do is: If you shoot a plunger, I'd weaken the spring tension a little or maby move the center shot in a little and see if that helps. BTW, are your nocks extremely tight on the string??? Just the ramblings of an old fart on too many medications......

tothepoint
December 31st, 2006, 11:49 AM
which flipper rest are you using? can you post a pic of it so we can see what angle you have it mounted at.

Karoojager
December 31st, 2006, 12:46 PM
When an arrow leaves the string with a finger release, it cycles horizontally. The ideal situation is that when the fletch passes the rest, the arrow is bent in the cycle so the fletch is away from the rest rather than into the rest. Could be that your arrows are too stiff an the cycle isn't right??? Could be?? Also, is it possible that the feathers are hitting the buss cables and not the rest?? Could be hand torque?? Bow could be slightly out of time... If the bow is for sure in time, and there's no possibility of hitting the buss cables, the first thing I'd do is: If you shoot a plunger, I'd weaken the spring tension a little or maby move the center shot in a little and see if that helps. BTW, are your nocks extremely tight on the string??? Just the ramblings of an old fart on too many medications......

Hi Unclegus,

I can speak here only for my release style ( two finger under ).
My nock point is in a right-angled ( above a brass nock point, beneath a string nock point ) If the arrow nock is on the string I have 0,04" between arrow nock and string nock point.

Now my button tuning :
Do this test after you have set up the nocking point.

When you are outside set up a boss at about 40m and pin a small piece of paper near the top of the boss to aim at. Set your sight mark for about 20 metres. Stand about 5 metres away from the boss (10 if you are using carbon arrows) and shoot about 3 arrows into the target. Mark down where they group. Now stand 10 metres back from the target (15 for carbon) and shoot another 3, noting where the group lands. Repeat this process of stepping back an extra 5 metres and shooting three arrows until the arrows land at the bottom of the boss. (Note you shoot three arrows to eliminate bad looses). At the end you should have about 6 different groups starting from the top of the boss going to the bottom. If they are in a straight line then your button is tuned properly. If they slant to the right at the bottom like this \ then you need to increase your spring tension. If they slant to the left / then you need to decrease the tension. If there is a C shape then you need to move the whole button into the bow. If the C shape is facing the other way like this ), move the button out of the bow.

It it worth noting that if you have two sets of arrows, eg carbon and aluminium, then it is an idea to have a separate buttons for each set if you can afford it. That way you know that both are always tuned properly to the bow.

Karoojager
December 31st, 2006, 12:50 PM
Here is a picture from my Plunger Rest from NAP

203434

shadowhunter
December 31st, 2006, 05:45 PM
The wire rest is supposed to flip out of the way with little resistance but it does take the pressure of the feather to move it. In time the feather will show wear but I don't think it affects your shot much. If you don't like it try the 150-160 dollar Drop Zone Freestyle with which doesn't touch the arrow on release. I haven't tried it cuz I love the NAP rest too much.

jerrytee
December 31st, 2006, 05:48 PM
Some Cartel rests do that because the wire is too thick.

capool
December 31st, 2006, 07:22 PM
which flipper rest are you using? can you post a pic of it so we can see what angle you have it mounted at.
with the side arm instead of plunger had a nap center rest it did the same thing.

tothepoint
January 1st, 2007, 08:47 AM
So your shooting one of these. If so how parallel to the ground is the slotted mounting bar. Some people put at them at high (20 -30 degree angles) to create a deeper V for the arrow to sit in. In this configuration the flipper doesn't function efficently.

203710

capool
January 1st, 2007, 07:46 PM
After looking at my the back of the rest is running up hill/ Does that make since to you ?

Robert58
January 1st, 2007, 08:19 PM
I mount mine with arm level, 90* to string. Inline with arrow.

Robert

tothepoint
January 1st, 2007, 08:45 PM
I'd turn it so it 90degrees to the string like 58 said. you can use a bow square on the back side of the bow to help you achieve a better alingment....

gregs
January 2nd, 2007, 08:56 AM
with the side arm instead of plunger had a nap center rest it did the same thing.

I had a rest like that when I shot a release for a year (so ashamed) but when I switched back to fingers I couldn't get clearance. I went with the NAP plunger/flipper like caracal.

Good luck.
GregS

Tom D
January 2nd, 2007, 09:13 AM
I shot the CenterRest Flipper for years on my bows. They slowly ate the bottom hen feather. The rest does flip out of the way, but the feathers are what makes the flip occur. There is contact between the finger and the feathers.

I have had this haapen on 4 bows. My wife has had it happen on 2.

It is one of the reasons I have now switched to a dropaway. The other reason was that the arrow made a very slight whisper as I drew it back, even with a silicone sleeve replacing the stock sleeve on the rest finger and moleskin on the rest face. As a bow hunter, I am always looking for ways to reduce noise.

Bowfishen Sully
January 2nd, 2007, 10:29 AM
I have had fletch contact issues with every single flipper style rest I've ever used ( durabilty issues also ) and I've tryed LOTS of them and the strange thing is most shot a arrow well ! That is to say I got good arrow flite out of them , Just couldn't keep the rest together and the fletching intack.

BUT that's just me

Robert58
January 2nd, 2007, 06:04 PM
I switched to a Golden Key Super Star. But I am useing the stiff arms off of my Martin Stinger rest which are about 1/4" shorter and it works great. I can shoot 3" and 4" vanes or 4" feathers, out to 20 yds. and they alll go into the same spot without having to change my sight. And it doesn't schrede my feathers. I am through looking for the perfect rest, I have found it.

Robert

Jorge Oliveira
January 2nd, 2007, 10:07 PM
I wonder if there couldn't be some cam timing problem?

Just suppose that due to timing, the nock end is driven slightly downward, putting pressure on the filpper arm?

Bowfishen Sully
January 3rd, 2007, 01:41 PM
YEP exactly Robert58


First off I shoot more of a "hunting" style arrow , Actully the same arrow for target and hunting w/ 4 in vains and prefer a NO CONTACT style rest Star Hunter , Super Star , Huntmaster 2000 , Timberdoddle ECT

When I found out that Golden Key went out of business I bought up 3 or 4 Superstars , hopfully this will cover me for a LONG while !!!!!!

tothepoint
January 3rd, 2007, 05:22 PM
BTW if anybody is interested Bodoodle is back in business, but you won't see any timberdoodles until around March of this year... I've heard nothing but good things about them and plan on putting one on my connie as soon as they hit the streets.