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jrbb00
May 8th, 2007, 11:40 AM
I have an arrow fletcher with only a straight jig. My question is. Will a straight fletcher work as well as a right or left jig for a three feather arrow.
I am shooting off the shelf out of my longbow and recurve. If I do not have any degree of angle on the feathers will this hurt my accuracy?
Thanks and any info will be greatly apreciated.

Viper1
May 8th, 2007, 11:48 AM
jr -

Feathers have a natural curvature to them that will give a ballistic spin to the arrow even if fletched straight. Most jigs do allow for some offset through, so not sure what you're using. Will it affect your accuracy? Depends on how well you can shoot and how well the rigs are tuned. All heavy helicals and high back feathers to is mask errors on both fronts. The more experienced you are, the less spin (and less fletch) you need.

Viper1 out.

TALON
May 9th, 2007, 12:41 AM
Yes, if you're shooting broadheads, helical is best. An accomplished archer can do very well with straight off-set [off-the-shelf], but that's someone who knows his stuff. If only shooting field points at targets, no worries!

jrbb00
May 9th, 2007, 02:20 PM
Thanks for the help. I will just have to buy the right jig for the job then because broadheads is what I shoot with most of the time.
Thanks again.

CCArrows
May 10th, 2007, 09:16 AM
Sure, you can shoot straight fletched arrows from a traditional bow. You can even shoot arrows fletched with vanes if you have the right kind of rest. The question is: Why would you want to?

There are three reasons that an arrow flies straight:
1. Momentum or inertia - Once a solid object is moving in a given direction it tends to continue moving in that direction until external forces (friction, wind, etc.) cause it to stop or change direction.
2. Head weight - The majority of the weight of an arrow should be forward of the center of the shaft. This is called FOC.
3. Drag - The majority of the drag on an arrow should be at the rear of the arrow. The fletching has to have a greater surface area than the point. I know more than one compound shooter that found that blazers, which worked fine with target and field points, were too small (provided too little drag) to stabilize their broadheads come hunting season.

My advice on arrows for your traditional bow is at least a 4 inch helical fletching and stick with feathers. Helical fletched arrows will give you more spin and better down range accuracy. If you decide to use straight fletched arrows use as much off- set as you can get and still have proper contact between the base of the fletching and the arrow shaft. If you decide to get a jig that will do helical fletching, you cannot do better than a Bitzenburger. They are more expensive, but they will last several lifetimes if not abused.

jrbb00
May 10th, 2007, 09:55 AM
I have a J-8 flething jig at the moment but I beleive it has the straight clamp at the moment. I am using quite a bit of offset with it and seems to be doing good but I am going to have to pick up the other clamp. The feathers I am using are 5 inch sheild cut right wing feathers. The few arrows that I have flethced with the jig are looking pretty good to me but I am no expert.
But it shure is relaxing and fun to do so if these do not work out then I will just have to enjoy refletching them with right helix jig.

Once again thanks for all the help.

tpoof
May 10th, 2007, 11:58 AM
That sounds like you have your jig set for pretty good "offset"

That should be just fine unless you're going to shoot big honkin broadheads...

Its good to have all the clamps anyways,, I have both the left and right wing clamps and it lets you use both wings from birds if'n you decide to go that route later

Artúr
June 1st, 2007, 08:01 AM
I have two sets of arrows, currently: One set is helical fletched, the other is straight fletched. The straight fletched, because I wanted to experiment a bit, has broadheads -- and they fly just as straight, just as accurately as the helical-fletched, target-tipped arrows.

There is no real difference if you use helical or straight fletching on any given arrow -- ***except*** for the amount of drag placed on that arrow, which should be negligible, if they are fletched correctly.

--Artúr

J. Wesbrock
June 1st, 2007, 11:09 AM
That sounds like you have your jig set for pretty good "offset"

That should be just fine unless you're going to shoot big honkin broadheads...

Its good to have all the clamps anyways,, I have both the left and right wing clamps and it lets you use both wings from birds if'n you decide to go that route later

What he said. :wink:

If you're only shooting target points, offset and helical are much less important than with broadheads. Field points don't try to steer the arrow or wind plane. If you're planning on hunting, I'd fletch your arrows the same as you would with broadheads. There's something to be said for keeping everything consistent.

kegan
June 1st, 2007, 02:17 PM
It doesn't matter if your arrows aren't helical- I have shot straight with boroadheads before with no problem (5" rw with a zwickey eskimo). Shot better than a field point. Many of my arrows, if not all, are straight.

Artúr
June 2nd, 2007, 05:03 AM
That sounds like you have your jig set for pretty good "offset"

That should be just fine unless you're going to shoot big honkin broadheads...

Its good to have all the clamps anyways,, I have both the left and right wing clamps and it lets you use both wings from birds if'n you decide to go that route later

Like I said earlier, it doesn't matter whether the fletch is straight or not, even with broadheads. And you can either right- or left-wing feathers with a straight clamp; just be sure to use all right-wing or all left-wing on the same arrow.

--Artúr

AKRuss
June 2nd, 2007, 01:35 PM
Hmmm, what did the Apache do before the invention of helical?

kegan
June 2nd, 2007, 05:47 PM
Hmmm, what did the Apache do before the invention of helical?

I can't really find any Native Americans that used much of a helical either.:confused: Were there any?

AKRuss
June 2nd, 2007, 06:58 PM
I was being sarcastic. There were no helical fletching jigs or spine testers in their hey-day. This was largely compensated by canting the bow.

Helical is great stuff and I often use it for broadheads myself but it's hardly necessary unless your tackle is mis-matched. A well known arrow maker, now deceased, used only straight fletch with no off-set and it worked just fine for both trad and compound bows.

jrbb00
June 3rd, 2007, 01:10 AM
Thanks for the help once again. Sorry it took so long to post back but have been out of town latley with work.

kegan
June 3rd, 2007, 06:18 PM
I was being sarcastic. There were no helical fletching jigs or spine testers in their hey-day. This was largely compensated by canting the bow.

Helical is great stuff and I often use it for broadheads myself but it's hardly necessary unless your tackle is mis-matched. A well known arrow maker, now deceased, used only straight fletch with no off-set and it worked just fine for both trad and compound bows.

I know- I was agreeing with you:)

art v
June 3rd, 2007, 06:32 PM
Straight fletching will give you a little more speed. But, your arrows need to be spined correctly.

Having a helical on your feathers is best when using broadheads. They will fight the tendency for an arrow to plan. A helical does slow the arrow some because of the increase in wind resistance.

It doesn't matter if you use left or right wing feathers regardless of which hand you shoot with.
Art

art v
June 3rd, 2007, 06:38 PM
As a matter of fact, Kegan, some tribes did use a helical when fletching their shafts. Indians did a bunch of testing and learned early on that a helical would help solve arrow planning problems.

Canting the bow does nothing to help arrow flight.....it simply gives you a better sight window and helps aligne arrows with the eye in relation to the target. If the arrow spin is wrong it is wrong weather or not you cant the bow.

Art

AKRuss
June 4th, 2007, 04:00 AM
I've always found increasing bow cant made up for erratic spined arrows.

GuyWithBow
June 4th, 2007, 09:21 AM
I've always found increasing bow cant made up for erratic spined arrows.

I've done that before too. Doesn't help so much with underspined shafts, but when I'm overspined, tends to make the arrow hit a little more to where I want it to go. Don't think it is flying better, just makes the arrow "kick" into the plane I'm used to it traveling in.

Sorry j, I'll stop high-jacking your thread now:)!!!

jrbb00
June 4th, 2007, 11:47 AM
Do not wory about it this is some good stuff that I have not even stopped to think about. Indians, Canting, this is intresting please hijack. Learning more on this board and asking questions then I ever have from a book.
So thank you for this extra information and you are not hijacking any thing I am still learning so you are broading my horizon.
Now if I could only learn to spell.

kegan
June 4th, 2007, 05:40 PM
All I know is that I have been shooting improperly spined arrows (not specific or consistent to the selfbow) with two straight fletches with broadheads with no problem. Heck- the "Seminole" method of fletching was simply to split the back perpendicular to the nock and stick a whole feather in. I use it- it works:). No need to make things fancy.

J. Wesbrock
June 4th, 2007, 05:45 PM
The Pilgrims may have killed a lot of animals with smoothbores, but there's a reason guns now have rifling. :wink:

sunaj
June 23rd, 2007, 03:25 AM
I would say if going to higher poundage corrected your spine what you in fact did was match the bow to the arrow (which therefore means the arrow was orignally overspined in the first place)

Artúr
June 23rd, 2007, 03:39 AM
Straight fletching will give you a little more speed. But, your arrows need to be spined correctly.

Having a helical on your feathers is best when using broadheads. They will fight the tendency for an arrow to plan. A helical does slow the arrow some because of the increase in wind resistance.

It doesn't matter if you use left or right wing feathers regardless of which hand you shoot with.
Art

Even straight feather fletches will impart some spin to the arrow, due to the natural physical properties of the feathers.

And it does matter which wing the feathers come from if you are shooting "off the hand'', as with an ELB (English LongBow) or Magyar Horsebow -- but not if the arrow never touches the bowhand at all. It hurts when the quill digs into the tender flesh of the finger...

--Artúr

kegan
June 23rd, 2007, 05:34 PM
And it does matter which wing the feathers come from if you are shooting "off the hand'', as with an ELB (English LongBow) or Magyar Horsebow -- but not if the arrow never touches the bowhand at all. It hurts when the quill digs into the tender flesh of the finger...

--Artúr

What do you mean? I have used both wing when shooting of my knuckle and have no problems. Besides, each feather has two "cups" one "left" and one "right" and it doesn't matter if you use two different wings if the cup is the same.

And it doesn't matter if you don't put helical on them, theywill still spin because of this cup. Bullets need riflings because they have no feathers on them.