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View Full Version : Opinions on Elk boots - Danners, Vasque, Asolo, Lowa . . .????



Meleagris1
April 23rd, 2008, 09:33 AM
I am looking for a good set of early season Elk hunting boots. Basically I'm trying to decided between backpacking/hiking boots or a more traditional 8" leather uninsulated hunting boot. They will be used in weather 20-80 degree's in the Rockies. I have gaiters for snow should I encounter it.

Even though I really like the Danner pronghorns, I'm thinking that hiking boots are the way to go, as they will be more durable, better fit and support and most likely lighter.

If any of you guys have recommendations on hikers like Vasque, Asolo or Lowa, let me know as I am not too familiar with their lines. Thanks! :darkbeer:

woodrow
April 23rd, 2008, 09:39 AM
I have the proghorns. Not a bad boot, but I wouldn't buy them again. I have had my rockys for two months longer than my danners, wore them more, and they still look new. The danners have a long break in period, and by the time there broke in, they are wearing out.

Wbuffetjr1
April 23rd, 2008, 09:52 AM
I'vee got the Danner Elk Hunters. They are a lil heavy, but you can walk forever in them. We put in 50+ miles in 10 days last year and my feet were great. It didn't take me very long to break them in. I also hunt Deer and Turkey season in them at home. I have worn them a ton and they are excellent shape.

djmaxwe
April 23rd, 2008, 10:03 AM
I would go with Muck boots. I have two pair and love both of them equally. LOL. I have some Rocky Bear claws and ever since I bought the mucks I have not even really thought of them. Mucks are the best boots out there.JMO

LetThemGrow
April 23rd, 2008, 10:19 AM
I would go with Muck boots. I have two pair and love both of them equally. LOL. I have some Rocky Bear claws and ever since I bought the mucks I have not even really thought of them. Mucks are the best boots out there.JMOMuck boots for an elk hunt? From my understanding of the terrain they are not at all suitable...

Mel...Danner makes an 8" Elk Hunter which my friends wore and they absolutely loved them....

peterskin8
April 23rd, 2008, 10:42 AM
Personally, i haven't been impressed with Danner's.

I like my mid-top Irish Setter's. Light weight, comfortable, and waterproof....i'd make sure you try on whatever it is you elect to buy first.

Viper04
April 23rd, 2008, 10:52 AM
I have a pair of lowa tibets and I am very impressed with them. Solid boots that are very comfy and supportive. I feel like I can walk anywhere with these things on my feet.

Before purchasing I read lots of reviews on bowsite.com and also checked out hiking websites like trailspace.com (tons of reviews on gear). Also 24hourcampfire.com and kifaur.net have some guys on the forums that really know their stuff.

Good luck, great boots make all the difference.

Lien2
April 23rd, 2008, 10:52 AM
I use Danner Pronghorn and Meindl Perfect Hikers. No complaints with either one.

Lien2

jdcamo
April 23rd, 2008, 10:58 AM
Lowa Tibets are awesome boots! No break in period. Good support and confort.

SOBLE
April 23rd, 2008, 10:58 AM
Rocky's ! :darkbeer:

deer4me
April 23rd, 2008, 11:02 AM
I like the backpacking/hiking type boots for early season. I've got vasque XCR, comfortable and waterproof. Have used Ecco boots before their also good boots.

BIV
April 23rd, 2008, 11:11 AM
I like my Vasques but I think the most important thing is that they feel good to you right away. Also make sure you get the proper size ie don't order out of a catalog. If they are too big you will have blisters from your heal slipping up and down. And if they are too small all your toenails will fall out from your toes banging into the end of the boot while walking down hill. I would recomend the most comfortable and stable hiking boots you can find. Make sure they have a good steel shank but that should not be a problem with the brands you listed. Also have the socks you are going to want to hike in on when you try them on. I like a medium weight hiking sock for hunting. I like goretex, it breaths better than some of the knock-off waterproofing systems. If your feet get wet you are much more likely to get blisters. These are the ones I have. I like the rubber over the toe so you don't wear through the leather on the toe from scrabling over rock or dead falls. This reminds me I need to send mine in to get re-soled soon. That will probably happen after Turkey season wraps up next month.

http://www.vasque.com/products/m-wasatchgtx.cfm

a3dhunter
April 23rd, 2008, 11:24 AM
Meindl Denali from Cabela's were on sale so I picked some up, they look to be my next boot for at least 4-5 years. They replace my Danner Pronghorns that I have used for 3 seasons.

I would also look at Lowa Tibet as well.

Sounds like you are looking for less boot, less support and less weight? I was looking for exact opposite, needed more support and more boot for most situations so I wet with the meindl's because I could actually try a pair on and I couldn't get to a Lowa dealer.

Ray.Klefstad
April 23rd, 2008, 11:28 AM
I also have the Vasque Zephyr gortex and have put many miles of steep climbing in them. I use them for hunting the steep mountains of CA and for daily hikes which are also steep and rocky.

I have never had a blister or hot spot and they grip like nothing else I've had. My foot has never slipped. And there was no break-in required. I would buy them again.

My buddy has Asolo boots and he loves them too. He lived in and hunted western Montana in them and they are still going strong.

Ray

Will K
April 23rd, 2008, 11:34 AM
Ok, I have not gone Elk hunting.

That said I have and do a lot of hiking. If you want absolutely awesome craftsmanship and a set of boots you will have for years and years - IE the Gray Woolf Woolens of the boot world, check out:

http://www.limmerboot.com/#

AWESOME boots. Absolutely fantastic for hiking be it with a heavy pack or sneaking around the mountains hunting.

Meleagris1
April 23rd, 2008, 11:35 AM
I am looking for a boot that is perfect for hiking rough country , but with enough support to safely pack out a load of meat. The Tibets look like great boots.

J-Daddy
April 23rd, 2008, 11:36 AM
The Danner Talus GTX is a nice boot if they fit....My feet are to wide to wear them though....Look at Lowa or Kennetrek boots.

as far as the guy who said Muck boots...Yeah if you want your feet to look like hamburger meat after a back country hunt they would be great.

Striker2
April 23rd, 2008, 11:54 AM
I only hunt elk. I take 2 weeks off work every year & continue to hunt the full 2 weeks with friends when I get one. I've packed several elk out on ankles that endured 7 years of basketball. IMO you cannot beat the Cabelas Pinnacle...

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0047885812731a&type=product&cmCat=SEARCH&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&QueryText=pinnacle&N=4887&Ntk=Products&Ntx=mode+matchall&Nty=1&Ntt=pinnacle&noImage=0

siucowboy
April 23rd, 2008, 12:02 PM
Meindl Perfect Hikers are what I use

Campo
April 23rd, 2008, 12:08 PM
You have obviously never been on an elk hunt.. :wink:


I would go with Muck boots. I have two pair and love both of them equally. LOL. I have some Rocky Bear claws and ever since I bought the mucks I have not even really thought of them. Mucks are the best boots out there.JMO

I would recommend the Vasque's....only hunting boot I will buy for warm weather hunting.

5MilesBack
April 23rd, 2008, 12:10 PM
I only hunt elk. I take 2 weeks off work every year & continue to hunt the full 2 weeks with friends when I get one. I've packed several elk out on ankles that endured 7 years of basketball. IMO you cannot beat the Cabelas Pinnacle...

Hmmmm, those look A LOT like my Rocky Lynx 800's for just about the same price, and they weigh exactly the same. I wonder if Rocky makes them for Cabela's? I'm surprised that I haven't seen these before, I'm always looking over the Cabela's catalogs. I like my Rocky's much better than the Pronghorns for elk hunting. They weigh a little more, but have much better support for ankles that have endured surgeries, multiple sprains, and 22 years of basketball.

ELECTRO
April 23rd, 2008, 12:27 PM
The problem I had with the pronghorns was that I thought they sqeaked to much. They were fine for the first year but I could not get them to stop sqeaking after that. I tried the oil/grease they recomend and lacing them up differently. Where I was hunting it was dry ground and the dirt would take all the moisture out of the leather very quickly. They worked great in the rain! :)

Beaver
April 23rd, 2008, 12:48 PM
I have been wearing Vasque for about 15 years now. I love them, they might not work for you. Boots are something you have to try on and find the ones that fit your type of foot. I have a high arch and instep. My second choice for early boots with a light to moderate pack are Merrells, they fit me awesome, and I use Merrells for trail running and mt biking. This is all about what fits your type of foot shape.

the-ghost
April 23rd, 2008, 01:05 PM
dunno but if you can try em on first do it.

LetThemGrow
April 23rd, 2008, 01:42 PM
The difference between the traditional stitch-down Danners and the new Danners like Pronghorns is night and day. The support and life of the original style is far superior.....

Meindl boots have served me well...never really liked them like I do my Danners though...friends of mine wore Vasque to hike the Appalachian Trail and were very pleased with their performance.

Never had a chance to try Lowa, would love to after seeing their construction and hearing reviews....

RockChucker30
April 23rd, 2008, 02:08 PM
Ditto Viper.
Check out 24hourcampfire and kiraru.net forums....Those guys are HARDCORE, and they repeatedly recommend Lowa as the best brand of hunting boot. You'll probably be wanting the Tibets, or the Sheephunters for later in the year. I've got Meindl's and a pair of Lowa Tibets, and the Tibets win. They would win over any of the brands you mentioned.





I have a pair of lowa tibets and I am very impressed with them. Solid boots that are very comfy and supportive. I feel like I can walk anywhere with these things on my feet.

Before purchasing I read lots of reviews on bowsite.com and also checked out hiking websites like trailspace.com (tons of reviews on gear). Also 24hourcampfire.com and kifaur.net have some guys on the forums that really know their stuff.

Good luck, great boots make all the difference.

Meleagris1
April 23rd, 2008, 04:42 PM
Thanks for all the input guys. I've decided to go ahead and buy a set of uninsulated Pronghorns. While I don't think they are necessarily the best boot out there, I know an awful lot of guys who really like them for early season Elk hunting. They are very light weight with a soft sole that lets me feel the ground well and which is also stickier on the rocks, something I like. When I finally draw a my bighorn tag, I will definitely be picking up a set of Lowa Tibets though. Again thanks for all the help! :darkbeer:

Quicksliver
April 23rd, 2008, 04:52 PM
Thanks for all the input guys. I've decided to go ahead and buy a set of uninsulated Pronghorns. While I don't think they are necessarily the best boot out there, I know an awful lot of guys who really like them for early season Elk hunting. They are very light weight with a soft sole that lets me feel the ground well and which is also stickier on the rocks, something I like. When I finally draw a my bighorn tag, I will definitely be picking up a set of Lowa Tibets though. Again thanks for all the help! :darkbeer:

The pronghorns are great for medium use. Very comfortable. But, the soles wear out in rocky terrain, and the uppers durability is to be desired. I was happy with mine for about 8 months of heavy use, now I'm looking to see if Cabela's return policy still holds.

You won't be dissapointed if you don't wear them a lot.

Hoyts n' Mulies
April 23rd, 2008, 05:03 PM
I've worn the same Danner model for about ten years. They last me about 2 1/2 years a pair and thats wearing them for all my hunting. I get the uninsulated gortex ones. They work just fine in the winter if you're doing any walking as your feet will be warm anyway. The only thing I will say is I forgot my boots on one two week trip to Montana and had to stop in Missoula and buy a pair. Trying to save money I picked up a cheaper pair of Danners for like $125 and they were the worst boots I've ever worn. I had horrible blisters and ripped two seems by the end of the hunt. If you go with Danners get a good pair. Use some snow seal on them and they will last you a long time! Also make sure you get a pair with the arch support cup built into the heel. On long hikes it makes all the difference.
Tim

a3dhunter
April 23rd, 2008, 05:09 PM
The biggest problem I have with my pronghorns is they stretch during the hunt.

When I start off a 10 days hunt they are really tight, by the third day my feet are sliding in them. I have the 400 gram insulation pronghorns. I love the big toe box and I thought they were great for the first 10 weeks of hunting, after that they aren't holding up. I put about 20 miles on them per week when hunting, give or take over the ten weeks I would confidently say that after 5 weeks the grip was not what I wanted for the mountains, found myself slipping on a lot of hillsides in Colorado last year.

DBL LUNG
April 23rd, 2008, 05:11 PM
Thanks for all the input guys. I've decided to go ahead and buy a set of uninsulated Pronghorns. While I don't think they are necessarily the best boot out there, I know an awful lot of guys who really like them for early season Elk hunting. They are very light weight with a soft sole that lets me feel the ground well and which is also stickier on the rocks, something I like. When I finally draw a my bighorn tag, I will definitely be picking up a set of Lowa Tibets though. Again thanks for all the help! :darkbeer:


I have had my Danner Pronghorns for a couple of years now and they are holding up great. Very comfortable. The best boot I have owned so far.
I also have the uninsulated Goretex Pronghorns. You'll be pleased with them.

5MilesBack
April 23rd, 2008, 06:44 PM
the grip was not what I wanted for the mountains, found myself slipping on a lot of hillsides in Colorado last year.

You've got that right. That and the poor ankle support, probably because they stretch and become too loose. I'm sure the grip in rocky terrain is better, but without the ankle support, I wouldn't want that either.

Kenny3D
April 23rd, 2008, 07:12 PM
I just bought a pair of 9 inch Irish Setter's Ground Sensing boots uninsulated and in Gore-tex . I must say these things are awesome!!! Very comfortable right away and no break-in needed. A ton of support and its a lightweight boot also.

I got mine from zappos.com.

You can order them and try em on to see if they are right for you. If not, you can send them back all free of charge and shipping both ways. You will love shopping with these guys. Your order will be at your door in 2 to 3 days.

I ordered several pair off different boots to see which I like the best and I choose the Setter's and sent the others back.

They have all the big name boots....Lowa, Vasque, Danner , Asolo (sp)...etc...shop on-line too!

SA_Rob
April 23rd, 2008, 08:47 PM
Kenetrek... period... end of story. designed and built with the rugged terrain of elk and sheep in mind. very rigid ankle support to both inside and outside to increase stability. rigid midsole with built in "roller" to keep forward momentum and increase torsional stability. k-talon outsole (replaceable) is extremely rugged for good traction on the nastiest shale sidehills and self cleans to prevent mud build up.

ELITE@LAST
April 23rd, 2008, 09:07 PM
Kennetrek Mountain Extreme 400
Lowa Tibet
Cabela's/Meindl Alaska Hiker
Cabela's/Meindl Perfekt Hiker
Cabelas/Meindl Denali
Cabela's Ibex Hunter
Danner ELk Hunter

in that order.... i just recently did a bit of a boot gear review for my upcoming season...i ordered both the Kennetrek and the Lowa sight unseen for lack of availability down here. I'm keeping both. The Lowa is a great boot and would prove itself very worthy early season and scouting. When the temps are expected to dip a little i'd go with the Kennetrek's... but you'd be hard pressed to go wrong with either. Awesome boots.

idaho77
April 23rd, 2008, 09:34 PM
Wore Danners for many years, but the last couple of pairs including one pair of Pronghorns leaked badly the second season. I also fell a lot when walking in the wet brush of north Idaho. I tried a pair of Vasque hikers last elk season and really liked them.

gil_wy
April 24th, 2008, 12:21 AM
The best two I have worn are the Lowa Banff (German)and the LL Bean Cresta Hiker (Italian)... I actually prefer the Crestas... not as stiff.. Both are of the highest quality.... IMHO European boots are far and away higher quality than their American/Chinese counterparts such as Danners...

I loved how comfy the Pronghorns were... But they simply fell apart... I couldn't get one pair to last 3 months...

storminN
April 24th, 2008, 01:36 AM
I would not listen to anyone on the net. I would go try them all on and see what fits your foot the best. I would also recomend gore tex or GT XCR since the are gonna get wet, maybe go through rain, dew, snow, dirt, and dry. All in the same day.

Insulated boots are too warm for early season, and I think it's hard to sneek around in 8" boots. YMMV.

Again,
Get the ones that fit.

J-Daddy
April 24th, 2008, 01:48 AM
Couple months ago I went looking for some new hiking boots for an early season mulie hunt we do...I went to buy the Danner Talus GTX cause I had read some really good things about them, but they fit me like crap. My foot was just to wide, same thing with all the Danner Pronghorns I've tried on in the past.
I ended up going with some cheap Columbia Diamond Peaks. Honestly they fit my feet better than any of the more expensive boots I tried on. Plus I've had good luck with Columbia hiking boots, I've got a pair that are still going strong after 8 years. I've whitetail & turkey hunted with them here in Iowa & in Kentucky plus I've wore them to Colorado a couple different times hiking with the wife and they've lasted really well for me. I know they aint Lowa's or Kennetrek's but for the money I've had good luck with them and they are plenty comfy for me, plus the new Diamond Peak's I got seem to have really good support & they are waterproof.

Hutnicks
April 24th, 2008, 01:49 AM
As a bonafide boot hound...

Vasque - used em for decades now, last well, but get someone who knows their fitting system to set you up or you can go through hell breaking them in.

Asolo - I can get a slighly better fit out of them then the Vasque's and rate them slighlt higher.

Hiking terrain boot, Hands Down... Limmers traditional all leather boot with Norwegian Welt construction. Once broken in (wear em daily for about 6 weeks) there is nothing like em.

Cofra - Still made in Italy and if you can find them the unsung bargain boot these days. Fit and support is better than Vasque or Asolo (for me) no fatigue and wear like iron (they started as a safety boot co) If I was forced to own one pair of boots, currently they would be it.

Meleagris1
April 24th, 2008, 07:49 AM
The best two I have worn are the Lowa Banff (German)and the LL Bean Cresta Hiker (Italian)... I actually prefer the Crestas... not as stiff.. Both are of the highest quality.... IMHO European boots are far and away higher quality than their American/Chinese counterparts such as Danners...

I loved how comfy the Pronghorns were... But they simply fell apart... I couldn't get one pair to last 3 months...


Cory I read your reveiw of the Lowas on Bowsite. Thanks for the info. One of the problems with the Lowas is that I have no place to try them, but we do have a Bean near us. I may drive up there and check out the Crestas. If you think they compare to the Lowas they are worth a look. Thanks!

ZA206
April 24th, 2008, 10:46 AM
I am looking for a boot that is perfect for hiking rough country , but with enough support to safely pack out a load of meat. The Tibets look like great boots.

I normally take 3 pairs of boots on my elk hunt... two pairs of hunting boots (lightweight, super aggressive sole, waterproof, medium ankle support, broke in and super comfy)..... I also take a pair of heavier, super stif Merrells. The Merrells are for packing meat (after the first load anyway).

My primary hunting boots are a pair of Irish Setter Field Trackers.... awesome boots. I never had to break them in, which is nice b/c I have a very wide foot. They felt like sneakers from day #1!

I think there are a TON of great boots out there, you gotta find one that fits your foot! (if you have a skinny foot, that helps)

-ZA

Tax Lawyer
April 24th, 2008, 11:07 AM
IMy primary hunting boots are a pair of Irish Setter Field Trackers.... awesome boots. I never had to break them in, which is nice b/c I have a very wide foot. They felt like sneakers from day #1!

On sale at Bass Pro for $59.98.....

McAllister
April 26th, 2008, 09:40 AM
I've owned 2 pair of Danner Pronhorns and there are my last pair! I can't make it thru a 2 week elk hunting trip with dry feet. The size/weight of a Danner Pronhorn is idea for hunting/backpacking in the Rocky mountains but they just don't hold up!

I to am looking for a good pair of boots to handle 40-50 miles worth of hiking in a 14 day trip. Something that is light weight, sturdy, waterproof and quiet. Hiking in the Rocky mountains when it is nice out is hard enough on boots, throw in rain/snow and you will have FUN..!!!!

Don't forget to buy a good light weight wool sock. One pair for every day!

Good luck!

ELITE@LAST
April 26th, 2008, 09:59 AM
I've owned 2 pair of Danner Pronhorns and there are my last pair! I can't make it thru a 2 week elk hunting trip with dry feet. The size/weight of a Danner Pronhorn is idea for hunting/backpacking in the Rocky mountains but they just don't hold up!

I to am looking for a good pair of boots to handle 40-50 miles worth of hiking in a 14 day trip. Something that is light weight, sturdy, waterproof and quiet. Hiking in the Rocky mountains when it is nice out is hard enough on boots, throw in rain/snow and you will have FUN..!!!!

Don't forget to buy a good light weight wool sock. One pair for every day!

Good luck!

Being you're in Montana i'd look at the Kennetreks or Lowas... i'm sure you can find a dealer up there. awesome boots.

gil_wy
April 26th, 2008, 06:36 PM
Paul,
The Cresta Hikers have been fabulous so far. I haven't hunted in them yet but spent a couple days up in area 7 a week or two ago and you know how rough that stuff is plus I have worn them nearly daily for 2 months. They still look new!! I wan't a big fan of the smooth leather but it is holding up even better than the Nubuck leather of the Lowas. I still love the Lowas, great boot, but the Cresta is the right combination of stiffness for packing and comfy enough to wear while still hunting or calling. Plus they come in 3 widths, so you will surely find a pair that will fit you well. It would be well worth visiting the Bean to check them out.

coonhound
April 26th, 2008, 09:00 PM
Kennetrek Mountain Extreme 400
Lowa Tibet
Cabela's/Meindl Alaska Hiker
Cabela's/Meindl Perfekt Hiker
Cabelas/Meindl Denali
Cabela's Ibex Hunter
Danner ELk Hunter

in that order.... i just recently did a bit of a boot gear review for my upcoming season...i ordered both the Kennetrek and the Lowa sight unseen for lack of availability down here. I'm keeping both. The Lowa is a great boot and would prove itself very worthy early season and scouting. When the temps are expected to dip a little i'd go with the Kennetrek's... but you'd be hard pressed to go wrong with either. Awesome boots.

That list is spot on except for the Danners, I used to wear the Meindl line with good success but i wanted just a touch more support. I just picked up a pair of the Kennetrek Mountain Extremes a couple months ago, WOW, these have by far the best support I've ever had outside of some of the heavy duty mountaineering boots.

As far as the Danner Pronghorns everyone is discussing, I had one pair and will never own another. They squeeked, they streched out terribly, and half way through their second elk season they blew out on me while I was on a ten day back country hunt. That was a pretty misserable hunt with a 2" hole in my boot.

Coon

PullinTriggers
April 26th, 2008, 11:39 PM
I have close to 200 miles on my Kenetrek Mountain Extreme 400's. These boots exceed all expectations that hunters have for footwear.

ELITE@LAST
April 26th, 2008, 11:42 PM
That list is spot on except for the Danners, I used to wear the Meindl line with good success but i wanted just a touch more support. I just picked up a pair of the Kennetrek Mountain Extremes a couple months ago, WOW, these have by far the best support I've ever had outside of some of the heavy duty mountaineering boots.

As far as the Danner Pronghorns everyone is discussing, I had one pair and will never own another. They squeeked, they streched out terribly, and half way through their second elk season they blew out on me while I was on a ten day back country hunt. That was a pretty misserable hunt with a 2" hole in my boot.

Coon

those danners were only on my list cause i tried em on:wink: but you'll notice they were dead last:zip: worst boot bar none. and i didn't like the Ibex Hunters at all. They felt about as comfortable as wearing a brick after trying the other boots on the list.

Boonerbrad
April 27th, 2008, 12:03 AM
I have to agree about proghorns being a poor quality boot when compared with the Lowa and Meindl. They are in different classes all together. For me the Lowa's fit better but i think my Meindl's have held up better. You have some great advice in this thread about the best boots money can put on your feet. And remember your feet will take a ton of abuse on a long hunt so you should not skimp on boots at all. If only the Pronghorn's did not squek,leak and stretch they might be allright.

mojado
April 27th, 2008, 12:06 AM
I have the proghorns. Not a bad boot, but I wouldn't buy them again. I have had my rockys for two months longer than my danners, wore them more, and they still look new. The danners have a long break in period, and by the time there broke in, they are wearing out.

complet opposite here.

mine were awesome, I did not need to break them in, man I did make the mistake of wearing them to disneyland on their first day:embara:, passed ,but the 800GR insulation plus 90 DEG weather sure was not good:cry:, no blisters just hot, but very comfortable.

love those boots.

mojado
April 27th, 2008, 12:13 AM
The biggest problem I have with my pronghorns is they stretch during the hunt.

When I start off a 10 days hunt they are really tight, by the third day my feet are sliding in them. I have the 400 gram insulation pronghorns. I love the big toe box and I thought they were great for the first 10 weeks of hunting, after that they aren't holding up. I put about 20 miles on them per week when hunting, give or take over the ten weeks I would confidently say that after 5 weeks the grip was not what I wanted for the mountains, found myself slipping on a lot of hillsides in Colorado last year.

:eek:, i better get my butt in shape for that Elk hunt.

McAllister
April 27th, 2008, 12:13 AM
I see Kenetrek is located in Bozeman MT. I had never heard of this boot company until this thread and I live 55 miles south of Bozeman on the Madison river. I will definetly check them out.

Thanks!

ELITE@LAST
April 27th, 2008, 12:18 AM
I see Kenetrek is located in Bozeman MT. I had never heard of this boot company until this thread and I live 55 miles south of Bozeman on the Madison river. I will definetly check them out.

Thanks!

Price is a little steep but they're well worth it i think... definitely worth the petro to at least go and try em out.:wink:

coonhound
April 27th, 2008, 12:27 AM
It amazes me how many people say they've never heard of Kenetrek?

They are missing out...

Coon

http://www.kenetrek.com/prodinfo.asp?number=KE-420-400

gil_wy
April 27th, 2008, 12:45 AM
My pronghorns would literally fall apart in 2-3 months... heel seperation mostly and the sole would literally have chunks coming off... comfortable as hell out of the box so I kept trying them... went through 3 pair before I learned my lesson...

twisted1600
April 27th, 2008, 02:26 AM
Good light boot...Very light boot!
Great traction,a little pricey,kind of a pain to put on quickly no speed lace.
These boots are not super durable but they are very light... if your willing to spend 140-160 bucks
for a pair of boot (to use one MAYBE two seasons) , need support and keep your lite feet these are for you!

390288

Meleagris1
April 27th, 2008, 07:51 AM
The Kenetreks look really nice. Same problem I have with the Lowas though, no place to try them on. I could order a couple pairs, then return them etc, but honestly I will only but putting these boots through real hell for one week of the year. The rest of the year I will just put miles on them upland bird hunting which isn't nearly as rough going. If I was hunting Elk all season, or even for 3 weeks, I would be buying a true backpacking quality boot.

2 Ultras
April 27th, 2008, 08:28 AM
My only experience with any of the boots listed in this thread is with Vasque and I can tell you that they are excellent. Light, comfortable and they can take a beating. However, I did try on a pair of Asolo's once and they felt superb. Didn't buy them because of the price,:embara: but in retrospect I should have peeled out the coin.
If you should be reduced to purchasing a pair of boots online because you can't find a certain style to try on, I would recommend zappos.com.:thumbs_up:thumbs_u p Not only is their shipping free, but if you must ship the boots back to them because they don't fit or you simply don't like them, that is free also! Competetive pricing too.

McAllister
April 27th, 2008, 09:25 AM
How about this boot? Any info???

Lowa Seeker GTX

Lightweight and taller (10") shafted field boot. Gore-tex waterproof liner keeps feet warm and dry. Cushioned mid-sole prevents fatigue on all day treks. Excellent traction on loose rock and off-trail environments. Ideal for bird hunting, field work and shooting clays.

* Uppers in split grain leather with Cordura® fabric
* GORE-TEX® lining for waterproofness and breathability
* PU midsole for underfoot cushioning
* Vibram® Vialta outsole for improved traction
* Excellent support for a 20+ pack.
* Whole and half sizes, 7-12. Whole sizes only larger than 12

Weight Per Pair ( Men's 9): 2.80 lbs

"Durability... flawless contruction... top choice for extreme mountain hunting.." - Bowhunter Magazine

Meleagris1 - I wouldn't trust the Danner Pronhorn to 1 week of Elk hunting. There's just to many problems with them. Dry feet are so important. I don't know where your going Elk hunting, but if its Montana in the third week of September 1 day of rain/snow is more than possible. Wet boots are hard to dry back at camp and overnight. Unless you can put some serious heat to them. There's nothing like waking up to FROZEN boots. You can always put your boots in a trash bag and stuff them down in your sleeping bag so they won't freeze.

ELKhuntR
April 27th, 2008, 11:49 AM
I love my Danner's personally. the pronghorn is a great boot. Not sure how long you're looking but I'm on year 5 with mine and they're as comfortable and broken in as ever. the heel fit for me is perfect. I maybe have gotten one small blister, not even noticeable, and have put some serious miles on them. gearing up for 5

one thing, get your boots quick and break them in all summer. that will make the difference.

Meleagris1
April 27th, 2008, 03:42 PM
I love my Danner's personally. the pronghorn is a great boot. Not sure how long you're looking but I'm on year 5 with mine and they're as comfortable and broken in as ever. the heel fit for me is perfect. I maybe have gotten one small blister, not even noticeable, and have put some serious miles on them. gearing up for 5

one thing, get your boots quick and break them in all summer. that will make the difference.

I know there have been some bad experiences here with the Danners but I have had some PM's from some very experienced Elk hunters on this site who really love the pronghorns. Kind of a mixed bag or reviews, but I'll give them a try. I should have them soon and I will post a pic of what they look like after a season of use and how they held up. :darkbeer:

a3dhunter
April 27th, 2008, 04:35 PM
:eek:, i better get my butt in shape for that Elk hunt.

I take it easy compared to some of these other hard core guys....I take my time to view the vistas and see how slowly I can still hunt....easier to keep my breath that way at 11-12K feet!:wink:

ELITE@LAST
April 27th, 2008, 06:30 PM
if you're lookin for a 10" version of the Lowa's.. get the Hunter GTX Extreme it's the 10" version of the Tibet:wink: all the same features of the Tibet but 10" check em out on there webpage.


How about this boot? Any info???

Lowa Seeker GTX

Lightweight and taller (10") shafted field boot. Gore-tex waterproof liner keeps feet warm and dry. Cushioned mid-sole prevents fatigue on all day treks. Excellent traction on loose rock and off-trail environments. Ideal for bird hunting, field work and shooting clays.

* Uppers in split grain leather with Cordura® fabric
* GORE-TEX® lining for waterproofness and breathability
* PU midsole for underfoot cushioning
* Vibram® Vialta outsole for improved traction
* Excellent support for a 20+ pack.
* Whole and half sizes, 7-12. Whole sizes only larger than 12

Weight Per Pair ( Men's 9): 2.80 lbs

"Durability... flawless contruction... top choice for extreme mountain hunting.." - Bowhunter Magazine

Meleagris1 - I wouldn't trust the Danner Pronhorn to 1 week of Elk hunting. There's just to many problems with them. Dry feet are so important. I don't know where your going Elk hunting, but if its Montana in the third week of September 1 day of rain/snow is more than possible. Wet boots are hard to dry back at camp and overnight. Unless you can put some serious heat to them. There's nothing like waking up to FROZEN boots. You can always put your boots in a trash bag and stuff them down in your sleeping bag so they won't freeze.

vonottoexperien
April 27th, 2008, 06:52 PM
http://www.russellmoccasin.com/

Russell boots, made to fit :cocktail:

house
April 27th, 2008, 10:31 PM
I used a pair of these on a CO. DIY hunt and they worked great. It was a seven mile walk in in the rain and mud and they never leaked a bit. After that we hunted five hard days with lots of walking. Followed by a seven mile pack out in the rain and mud. No sore feet or blisters. I will use again. Great boot at a reasonable price!!!

TheTone
April 27th, 2008, 11:01 PM
Some danners are still an ok boot, namely ones that are made in the USA. The ones made overseas, like the pronghorns, are no where near what I demand from an elk hunting boot. I owned one pair of the pronghorns and they were shot in about 6-7 months. They were purchased new before elk season and were gone before may of the next year. They were super comfy, but are not built for series demands. I had them warrantied with a set of Danner Grand Slams that have been a little better but realilistically are also done for. They maybe had a two moth longer life span than the pronghorns. My Meindl Perfekt Hikers are still looking really good after about a year and a half of torture. My next boots will more than likely be Lowas.

badbow148
April 27th, 2008, 11:13 PM
Its just pretty hard to beat a Danner boot of any kind.

oregonelkhunter
April 27th, 2008, 11:29 PM
I thought I was the only one that had Danners that squeak...
The ones I have now I bought about 6 years ago, Danner Raptors, U.S made.
They have held up well, but most of time they are to warm to use for bow season..
They have terrible lateral support though and we do a lot of hiking in rough country. So by the end of a 6-8 day hunt my feet were killing me.
Time to look for some new boots this year, more of a hiking style, uninsulated.

bullelk1
April 27th, 2008, 11:44 PM
I've been wearing the Meindl Perfekt Hikers for 6 years. I elk hunt about 20 days a year, and also wear them for spring bear hunting (many times following a pack of hounds). They have never let me down. Bought a second pair for last season, thinking my old ones had had it, and they still made it through season, and are still going strong.

ELITE@LAST
April 28th, 2008, 08:02 AM
I thought I was the only one that had Danners that squeak...
The ones I have now I bought about 6 years ago, Danner Raptors, U.S made.
They have held up well, but most of time they are to warm to use for bow season..
They have terrible lateral support though and we do a lot of hiking in rough country. So by the end of a 6-8 day hunt my feet were killing me.
Time to look for some new boots this year, more of a hiking style, uninsulated.

that's the trick is gettin the ones that are made in the U.S. those are the only ones that hold up from what i've seen and heard.

rachunter
April 28th, 2008, 01:06 PM
On my last early season elk hunt I took a pair of uninsulated Danner Pronghorns and a pair of Cabela's Gore-Tex Silent Stalk Sneaker
http://www.cabelas.com/prod-1/0039070812513a.shtml
I prefered the Silent Stalks....great boot, waterproof and lightweight.

LetThemGrow
April 28th, 2008, 06:01 PM
1. I would not listen to anyone on the net.

2. I would go try them all on and see what fits your foot the best.

3. I would also recomend gore tex or GT XCR since the are gonna get wet, maybe go through rain, dew, snow, dirt, and dry. All in the same day.

4. Insulated boots are too warm for early season,

5. and I think it's hard to sneek around in 8" boots.
1. Not sure why you are a member here if you expect that nobody will listen to others opinions? :noidea: I hope as a newbie you are enjoying AT.

2. I think that was understood, that the poster was just looking for some direction and recommendations from fellow archers (yes, on the net! :eek:)

3. Which of the above mentioned boots DON"T have Gore-Tex? :noidea:

4. Wow...thanks for that tidbit of info. What are your thoughts on 200 grams of insulation? I can wear Danner 200 gram right through the summer with no issues....not sure if you have ever tried a good boot?

5. Never noticed a problem with that...maybe I'm the only one? :confused3:

LetThemGrow
April 28th, 2008, 06:02 PM
that's the trick is gettin the ones that are made in the U.S. those are the only ones that hold up from what i've seen and heard.
:thumb: They are the usually the models with the stitched down sole...the "traditonal" Danner that is far superior to the Pronghorn-style boot...

VorTexan
April 28th, 2008, 07:47 PM
I took a 3 mile hike yesterday in some Merrell's and those things (been wearing them to work for a few months now) are going with me to New Mexico or Colorado one this September. Yes, I have had Vasque, Danner, Rocky, Columbia, to name a few.

Meleagris1
April 30th, 2008, 09:36 PM
I had to scratch the Pronghorns as they just did not fit me well at all. So I decided to take a trip to LL Bean to check out the Crestas. I tried them on in 4 different sizes, medium and wide widths, and then tried on Bean's all leather Day hikers and some Merrels. I really wanted to like the Crestas more, but the Bean Day hikers were far and away the best fit for me, nice and snug around the heel (crestas were loose for me), no tongue squeaking (Crestas squeaked badly), very comfortable, great sole and tread with the right mix of flexibility and rigidity. Otherwise I liked both equally but the fit really sealed the deal, plus all Beans stuff has a lifetime warranty, no questions asked. Here is a link and pic. They look much more impressive in person.

http://www.llbean.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?page=gore-tex-day-hikers&categoryId=42040&storeId=1&catalogId=1&langId=-1&parentCategory=503391&cat4=503383&shop_method=pp&feat=503391-tn&np=Y

RockChucker30
April 30th, 2008, 09:57 PM
I'd list the best boots like this: Lowa, Kennetrek, Hanwag, and Meindl. The first three are probably interchangeable and a little better than the Meindl...I've got a pair. I think you've got to order the Hanwags from Canada, but guys on the serious mountain/alaska forums love them. I'm wearing my Lowa Tibets at work right now...lots of support, but very comfortable.

you-rang
May 5th, 2008, 12:42 PM
Well based on the info in this thread i ordered a pair of Lowa Tibet GTX boots from Zappos 2 weeks ago. I have been wearing Meindls for the last several years before that i wore danners. I'll have to say that these are by far the best boots for hiking, hunting, backpacking that i have owned so far. I wore them to work last tuesday through friday just to get the feel and then on saturday loaded up the pack (around 30 pounds) and went for a 5-6 mile hike awesome support, great traction my foot didnt slip inside the boot at all, uphill downhill sidehill didnt matter they performed great. Thanks to everyone that recomended them im sure ill appreciate it even more this september when i head into the Bob Marshall Wilderness Area in Montana for my Elk Hunt.

Meleagris1
May 5th, 2008, 01:55 PM
Well, after wearing the Bean hikers around for a few days I wasn't happy with a hotspot I was feeling with the right boot, so I took them back and went to the only other shop locally that has backpacking boots, Eastern Mountain Sports. I thought about the Lowas again but I wanted them professionally fit, I wanted to be able to try on my size and a 1/2 size up and down, and I wanted to have the ability to try the various Superfeet insoles.

I was lucky enough to work with a guy there who does a lot of backpacking and we spent an hour fitting different boots. It was a mess I must of had 10 different boot boxes out, with at least 20 pairs of superfeet insoles with varying amounts of arch support etc.

As soon as I tried on the Asolo TPS 520 GV's, I knew immediately that was the boot I wanted. Fit was as close to a custom boot as I think I will ever get. I decided on superfeet orange insoles and they are amazing as well, I wore them around this weekend and the amount of support is unbeliveable. Pricy boots($230, $35 for insoles) but well worth it.

ELITE@LAST
May 5th, 2008, 02:33 PM
glad you got squared away... hope you get to put a lot of miles on em this year.

Jwillman6
May 5th, 2008, 06:04 PM
I have the Lowa sheep Hunters and they are great. I think this boot is now called the Schnees Sheep Hunter. I have heard good things about the Mendls too.;

Matt Palmquist
May 5th, 2008, 07:14 PM
Paul-

I have the same boot you ended up getting. I have had good luck with them. They treated me pretty good on my trip to the mountains. I did have some issues with my toes going to sleep several days into the trip, but I think it had more to do with carrying 50-60 pounds on my back all day everyday then it did my boots. I didn't have any problems with blisters, but I was using smart wool socks.

I just received a set of green superfeet in the mail today. I got them fitted and plan on trying them out tonight. Did your superfeet fit pretty snug? I saw in the manual it talks about minimal movement. I don't think mine will move at all, but the toes are not curled.

Enjoy your boots.

Matt

shooter31
May 5th, 2008, 07:38 PM
I have a pair of Silvis boots. Don't recall which model. They have been very good. They wee very easy to break in and have held up very well. I've hunted in them for two (or three??) years now and they are still going strong. They have some serious miles on them in the Rockies in everything from rain to snow to mud bogs, rocks, up, down, you name it... I would buy another pair if I were looking.

Meleagris1
May 5th, 2008, 07:57 PM
Sounds like you did it right. I had the shop do it, but they basically traced the stock insole on the back of the Superfeet insole and cut it that way. You dont want any curl, just a flat fit all the way to the end. I use the smart wool (cabelas ingenius wool) also.

The superfeet green have quite a bit of arch support. I have medium arches and the greens were too much for me. The blue has the lowest arch support, and the orange is in the middle with additional fore foot cushioning. I liked the blue and orange, but went with the orange for more support while hiking. Just keep in mind that too much arch support can be painful.



Paul-

I have the same boot you ended up getting. I have had good luck with them. They treated me pretty good on my trip to the mountains. I did have some issues with my toes going to sleep several days into the trip, but I think it had more to do with carrying 50-60 pounds on my back all day everyday then it did my boots. I didn't have any problems with blisters, but I was using smart wool socks.

I just received a set of green superfeet in the mail today. I got them fitted and plan on trying them out tonight. Did your superfeet fit pretty snug? I saw in the manual it talks about minimal movement. I don't think mine will move at all, but the toes are not curled.

Enjoy your boots.

Matt

Matt Palmquist
May 6th, 2008, 01:03 AM
Thanks for the info. I didn't have anywhere to try them all as you did, I will wear them for a while and see how they feel.

Thanks again,
Matt

ZA206
November 16th, 2008, 11:06 PM
Hey Paul....

I wanted to dig this thread up for X-mas. Good hunting boots are a great X-mas gift from the wife/family.

FYI.... I just asked the wife for a pair of Lowa Tibet's!:thumbs_up Of course since I had bragged on the Irish Setters, they decided to soak my feet one morning crossing a meadow during my elk hunt this year. They were shot for the rest of the trip (I could'nt get them dried back out):rolleyes:.

I actually found the Lowa Tibet's and decided on them w/o looking at this thread. I'm glad alot of other guys like them... that makes me feel better about my choice.

Happy Holidays guys!!!


-ZA



Sounds like you did it right. I had the shop do it, but they basically traced the stock insole on the back of the Superfeet insole and cut it that way. You dont want any curl, just a flat fit all the way to the end. I use the smart wool (cabelas ingenius wool) also.

The superfeet green have quite a bit of arch support. I have medium arches and the greens were too much for me. The blue has the lowest arch support, and the orange is in the middle with additional fore foot cushioning. I liked the blue and orange, but went with the orange for more support while hiking. Just keep in mind that too much arch support can be painful.

Samuraiarcher
November 16th, 2008, 11:18 PM
Danner Pronghorns were great for about 1/2 a season, then their lightweight benefit turned into a negative when my ankle rolled.

With all of the trekking you will be doing in rough country, over blow-downs, steep canyons, and hopefully packing quarters out, do yourself a favor and get a pair of supportive, comfortable boots. You will not be sorry you spent any extra money, but if you buy an inferior boot, you may regret it.

Wille
November 17th, 2008, 02:49 AM
Cabela's Ibex™ Hunting Boots by Meindl Item:XJ-810614
Reg: $179.99 on Sale: $159.95

very good boot for it´s price

slim9300
November 17th, 2008, 03:18 AM
I posted a response to this thread quite a while ago, but I want to give my latest impression of my Pronghorns...

I don't know how anyone can say that Pronghorns have a long break in period. I truly believe that they are the only boot I have worn that have no break in period. I am on my third pair right now. This year I went on a backcountry hunt in Central MT. My two year old Pronghorns leaked a couple days before I left, so I bought a new pair and took both with me. I wore the new ones for the entire 10 day hunt where I walked roughly 60 miles in high elevation and packed out (on our backs) two big 6 point bulls 8 miles each. I never got a single blister. They are definately the best boots I have found.