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View Full Version : Bill Winke's "Tough Bucks, Tougher Shots article is very surprising.



skyhunter
September 12th, 2008, 08:25 PM
In the november 2008 Petersens Bowhunting magazine Bill Winke writes an article titled "Touch Bucks, Tougher Shots", which lead to me being very surprised by what I felt to be missing when it came to shooting at big bucks. While I agree with him on many aspects of what was written, I believe he omitted perhaps the most important aspect of shooting a buck or any deer for that matter.

He talked of how bucks are on the move during the rut and that shots get tough because of this. I totally agree with him here. He then spoke of the option of either shooting the buck on the move or stopping it to get a shot. Here is where I couldn't understand his logic.

His choice of the 2 options was to shoot at a moving buck. He said he likes to look for an opening and then shoot as the buck passes through that opening. He said "the timing itself is not very difficult". He then spoke of "putting the pin on the front third of the deer's shoulder or the front edge of the shoulder for a longer shot. I have no problem with this; what I have a problem with is that he does not even mention the other option.

While he stated that shooting at a moving buck was preferable to stopping the buck for a shot, nowhere in the whole article did Mr Winke talk about the option of stopping the buck for a shot, or how to go about executing that shot. This really surprises me!

He also never even mentioned one of the most important factors when shooting at deer which in my opinion is the demeanor of the animal at the time of the shot. I also find that very surprising. Any bowhunter with some experience should know and teach that the demeanor of the animal is a key factor in determining where to aim.

Nowhere in this article that was all about how to shoot at big bucks, did Bill talk about how to shoot at an animal that had an alert posture. Most of us know (depending on the distance of the shot) to aim low when attempting shots at alert animals. I usually aim low when the animal is alert and in fairly close proximity to me. The "stop em and shoot em" shot is a vital shot when it comes to shooting bucks that are hastily moving around durring the rutting time period, but Bill never even mentions the shot. I realize it may not be his choice, but to not even cover it is not the sign of a thorough author, who is often said to be an authority on bowhunting.

Bill instead says in the conclusion of his article to "be ready for long tough shots under low light, and possibly at moving deer".

I don't get it? This guy is supposed to be teaching when he writes in magazines. The guy talks about everything but what in my opinion is the most important factor when shooting at deer; and that is the possibility of the animals reaction to the shot going off. I find this factor far more important than how to shoot at a moving deer.

What do you all think?

Shouldernuke!
September 12th, 2008, 08:52 PM
I think he made his point well .Bowhunting durring the rut is not a easy task. Anyone who has tried to stop a buck that is chaseing a doe or moveing on a mission will usually be unsuccessful most times it will spook or alert the buck and that is always a bad deal.

The point is there a time to take your own personal best to the limit .Shooting a walking or moveing deer is not that hard and can be done if practiced and done well . About any hunter knows how to grunt or make a noise to try and stop a buck .But durring the rut old bucky could usually care less about it or blow out taking the whole gang with em.

So his point is shoot the shot you can but your personal thoughts or ethics really do not matter to him or any other hunter and that is as it should be IMHO .

Stanley
September 12th, 2008, 09:17 PM
There is a big difference in a moving buck and a running buck. Most mature bucks in the peak of the rut are on the move. A moving buck at 10 yards is way different than a moving buck at 30+ yards. Stopping a moving buck is my last option. Iíll take a moving 15 yard shot over trying to stop a buck for a shot. A moving buck will almost never react to the shot.

skyhunter
September 12th, 2008, 09:22 PM
.But durring the rut old bucky could usually care less about it or blow out taking the whole gang with em.I have a pile of shots on video where the old buck was stopped by the hunter and then shot. Why do you insist that "old bucky could usually care less", as if to say this method does not often work?

skyhunter
September 12th, 2008, 09:24 PM
There is a big difference in a moving buck and a running buck. Most mature bucks in the peak of the rut are on the move. A moving buck at 10 yards is way different than a moving buck at 30+ yards. Stopping a moving buck is my last option. Iíll take a moving 15 yard shot over trying to stop a buck for a shot. A moving buck will almost never react to the shot.Ok the big guy is walking by at 20-25 yards. Now what?

Gr8ride65
September 12th, 2008, 09:27 PM
how to shoot at a moving deer?

Put the appropriate pin on the kill zone and let 'er fly. J/K

I read the same article last night. It's election season and everyone is starting to act like a politician. They give you a flury of words that are very educational but yet, don't seem to tell you anything.

skyhunter
September 12th, 2008, 09:46 PM
Put the appropriate pin on the kill zone and let 'er fly. J/KYep, he says "trip the trigger when the pin covers the front third of the deer's shoulder".

Normally I like to aim away from the shoulder. I understand that he is actually leading the deer since it is moving, but the actual shoulder on a deer is up high on the animal, and aiming high at deer passing close by ain't a good thing.

Not once did he touch on how to aim at deer that were standing still.

C-NOGLE
September 12th, 2008, 10:10 PM
Draw, then a quiet mrrpp, shoot, prayer of thanks followed by pumped fist and shakey legs. Call the taxidermist, I just killed him.
I stop them all the time. I agree, the stop em technique is more ethical and reliable than a moving shot of any speed or distance.