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mdmountainman
March 27th, 2009, 08:22 AM
Alright, I have to vent. My father in law has a 17 acre property that borders a much larger property. At one corner of my in law's property he has his log splitter set up in an area where he works year round. Now the neighbor a hunter decides to dump about 15 carved up deer carcasses, on his own property, but right next to where my in-law chops his wood. Like 10 -15 yards from his splitter. He has a HUGE piece of property and could have easily placed the carcasses anywhere else.

I realize he is within his rights to do so. It is on his property. My father in law however does not hunt and isn't nearly as open to Hunting anymore because of this. He has always let me hunt and will continue to do so but these are the types of things that we as hunters need to avoid to not be seen as A**HO**S.

Any advice? My father in law doesn't want to speak with the guy about it. He is too busy and has no interest in talking about dead deer.

It is just sad that people like that give hunters a bad name.:embara:

EDIT: OH and apparently one of the neighbors family members is a game warden!

old Graybeard
March 27th, 2009, 08:24 AM
I'd say there isn't anything he can do or has the right to do?

mdmountainman
March 27th, 2009, 08:31 AM
I'd say there isn't anything he can do or has the right to do?

I agree. The guy has every right to do what he did legally. It is the ethical side of it that I wanted to bring to light. This is the kind of thing that could turn someone who is otherwise indifferent to hunting into an anti-hunter!

We need to be more considerate as stewards of this sport.

My.02

Sterling
March 27th, 2009, 08:39 AM
Maybe YOU could say something. Not tell him to stop because it is his property but, ask him to maybe dump future remains away from the prop. border. Let him know that is where your dad in law works and the smell is too much now.

mason79
March 27th, 2009, 08:41 AM
i agree there is nothing that can be done legally, but if i was u i would talk to the guy anyway. just be nice and explain the situation, if he is a good guy he will dump them in another spot. who knows, a nice friendly chat may even open up more hunting spots for u.

Yamahog12
March 27th, 2009, 08:43 AM
Did the guy do this to piss your father-in-law off, or was it coincidence? Kinda sounds like the former but why? Does your FIL know the guy? If he (your FIL) isn't going to say anything then there's little chance of change. On the other hand, it could start a hot war instead of a cold war. If nobody is gonna talk, then what advice could one give?

I guess just suck it up and take it.

BCFrye_Kansas
March 27th, 2009, 08:44 AM
I agree. The guy has every right to do what he did legally. It is the ethical side of it that I wanted to bring to light. This is the kind of thing that could turn someone who is otherwise indifferent to hunting into an anti-hunter!

We need to be more considerate as stewards of this sport.

My.02

I wouldn't go as far as to say he is ethically wrong. Ethically it's no big deal either. Can see where it might be in poor taste, but you'd have to see it from the other guy's perspective before you can judge it. He might not appreciate the fact that your father-in-law has 17 acres and chooses to run his log splitter 10-15yds from the back fence.

If it bothers you that much talk to him. He might appreciate the opportunity to explain himself.

JamMorg
March 27th, 2009, 08:52 AM
Move the log splitter until the pile is gone.

Meleagris1
March 27th, 2009, 08:56 AM
Never hurts to try talking with the guy, that would be my first recommendation. Definitely two issues here, noise pollution from the splitter running constantly, and the stench of rotting deer carcasses.

If that doesn't work, check your state and local laws regarding the meat processing and disposal of waste. I was involved in a similar situation here in NY where 50-100 deer were dumped on private property by a butcher. The stink it created was unreal, not to mention the animals it was attracting, flies, and the fact that it was located near a large trout stream. The DNR wrote the guy several tickets and made him clean up the mess. Your case is a little different, but it would be worth a call. I would talk to the chief game warden, to make sure you are over top of the one warden who is a family member.

WEEGEE
March 27th, 2009, 08:58 AM
i agree there is nothing that can be done legally, but if i was u i would talk to the guy anyway. just be nice and explain the situation, if he is a good guy he will dump them in another spot. who knows, a nice friendly chat may even open up more hunting spots for u.

very ,very good advice mason

ks_kiwi
March 27th, 2009, 09:03 AM
Set up a treestand near the log splitter and do some coyote hunting :wink:

mdmountainman
March 27th, 2009, 09:07 AM
I agree with most here that the communication between the two leaves a lot to be desired. I encouraged my father in law to talk to the guy in a friendly way. He would rather just be upset about it than try to work through it. That is not a healthy way to handle it. Maybe the guy didn't even think about what he was doing. Regardless of the intentions, little things like this can create further spats that just aren't worth the time.

My reasoning for posting was just to raise more awareness among hunters about how much our actions can affect the opinions of people who are otherwise indifferent about hunting. Things like that can, unfortunately, give all hunters a bad name.

We can do better.

I also don't know why he didn't keep some of the leg bones for making broth? I saw up the femur and tibia on all my deer and boil them to make excellent bone broth. If you haven't tried this, I highly encourage it! The bones keep in the freezer very well until you are ready for them. Bone marrow is full of wonderful nutrients.

mdmountainman
March 27th, 2009, 09:11 AM
Never hurts to try talking with the guy, that would be my first recommendation. Definitely two issues here, noise pollution from the splitter running constantly, and the stench of rotting deer carcasses.

If that doesn't work, check your state and local laws regarding the meat processing and disposal of waste. I was involved in a similar situation here in NY where 50-100 deer were dumped on private property by a butcher. The stink it created was unreal, not to mention the animals it was attracting, flies, and the fact that it was located near a large trout stream. The DNR wrote the guy several tickets and made him clean up the mess. Your case is a little different, but it would be worth a call. I would talk to the chief game warden, to make sure you are over top of the one warden who is a family member.

Interesting. I would be the last type of person to call the authorities on anyone unless it got really bad. I believe in men working things out between themselves. In this situation, it isn't my property, so I don't want to over step my bounds. I did offer to talk to the guy on behalf of my father in law. He didn't want to risk a feud.

mdmountainman
March 27th, 2009, 09:12 AM
Set up a treestand near the log splitter and do some coyote hunting :wink:

No coyotes here. Vultures and feral cats only!

athomPT
March 27th, 2009, 09:15 AM
My only advice is to tell you in-law not to go splitting without packing. Those carcasses will attract predators & scavengers.

boarman1
March 27th, 2009, 09:16 AM
Well if you cant just talk to him and ask him if there would be another place for him to do this or not. but Some areas required you to dig a pit to bury them in for disease purposes. So he could get in trouble for this depending on the area you are in. But being polite is the best way to handle this problem. Good luck.

Deerminator
March 27th, 2009, 09:20 AM
Try this

Skeptic
March 27th, 2009, 09:23 AM
I agree with most here that the communication between the two leaves a lot to be desired. I encouraged my father in law to talk to the guy in a friendly way. He would rather just be upset about it than try to work through it. That is not a healthy way to handle it. Maybe the guy didn't even think about what he was doing. Regardless of the intentions, little things like this can create further spats that just aren't worth the time.

My reasoning for posting was just to raise more awareness among hunters about how much our actions can affect the opinions of people who are otherwise indifferent about hunting. Things like that can, unfortunately, give all hunters a bad name.

We can do better.

I also don't know why he didn't keep some of the leg bones for making broth? I saw up the femur and tibia on all my deer and boil them to make excellent bone broth. If you haven't tried this, I highly encourage it! The bones keep in the freezer very well until you are ready for them. Bone marrow is full of wonderful nutrients.

Sorry but I don't understand your beef! It surely isn't giving hunters a bad name!

There is no harm in you talking to the guy NICELY and explaining the situation. He probably doesn't realize it bothers your FIL. I'm guessing he wants to keep the coyotes as far from his house as possible and dumps the carcasses as far from his house as possible.

If anything, I think this is YOUR time to be a good steward and explain to your FIL how this other 'hunter' is doing his part in utilizing all the meat. He has to put the carcasses somewhere doesn't he.

Really sounds like your FIL's stubborness is as much of the problem if not the entire problem.....more than anything.

wbygunner
March 27th, 2009, 09:25 AM
Not really an ethical issue, especially in regards to hunters or hunting. As someone else said, maybe your father in-law shouldn't have his log splitter right next to the shared property line if activities on the neighboring property are going to upset him.

Beamen123
March 27th, 2009, 09:36 AM
They're right. There's nothing your family can do.

popestev
March 27th, 2009, 09:49 AM
Sorry but I don't understand your beef! It surely isn't giving hunters a bad name!

There is no harm in you talking to the guy NICELY and explaining the situation. He probably doesn't realize it bothers your FIL. I'm guessing he wants to keep the coyotes as far from his house as possible and dumps the carcasses as far from his house as possible.

If anything, I think this is YOUR time to be a good steward and explain to your FIL how this other 'hunter' is doing his part in utilizing all the meat. He has to put the carcasses somewhere doesn't he.

Really sounds like your FIL's stubborness is as much of the problem if not the entire problem.....more than anything.

I don't understand how you don't see this as a problem. As hunters it is all our problems. Every one of us need to be aware of how the non hunters view us. No one is ever going to change the mind of a tree hugger, however; The non hunters are very important. Non hunters are about 86% of the population and some of us call them voters. If we can change where whe leave the remains of our kills to make some one happy then by allmeans it is what we should do. We have to share the world and get along with the majority who does not hunt or they are going to take our privladge away.

2wyoming
March 27th, 2009, 09:51 AM
very ,very good advice mason

+1.

davydtune
March 27th, 2009, 09:55 AM
Not saying it's right but maybe the guy was offended that your in law had his splitter so close to his property? Maybe that was an area he wanted to hunt and was disturbed by the activities going on there? I'd have to say the carcasses where placed there on purpose to make a point and his land is his and he has a right to do what he wants. Not a very neighborly thing to do. Sometimes a little talking can make these kind of situations not happen as well but the communication goes both ways.

HOKIEHUNTER07
March 27th, 2009, 09:58 AM
He's probably ticked about all the log-splitting goin on while he's trying to hunt...

NEWYORKHILLBILLY
March 27th, 2009, 10:09 AM
Alright, I have to vent. My father in law has a 17 acre property that borders a much larger property. At one corner of my in law's property he has his log splitter set up in an area where he works year round. Now the neighbor a hunter decides to dump about 15 carved up deer carcasses, on his own property, but right next to where my in-law chops his wood. Like 10 -15 yards from his splitter. He has a HUGE piece of property and could have easily placed the carcasses anywhere else.

I realize he is within his rights to do so. It is on his property. My father in law however does not hunt and isn't nearly as open to Hunting anymore because of this. He has always let me hunt and will continue to do so but these are the types of things that we as hunters need to avoid to not be seen as A**HO**S.

Any advice? My father in law doesn't want to speak with the guy about it. He is too busy and has no interest in talking about dead deer.

It is just sad that people like that give hunters a bad name.:embara:

EDIT: OH and apparently one of the neighbors family members is a game warden!


At first it seems he has the right to do so. But there are many laws that prevent people from doing what they want on there land. Like most place's have zoning that would not let you put old cars out there. I know are state has laws against dumping dead deer ,they must be put back at the place of kill to be legal. I sure if you want to get nasty there is something you can do about it. Everyone thinks they can do what they want on there land but its not true, we Just rent this land from are government. If you want to test my theory. Just start running around you own land nude ,or start shooting a riffle every hour for 30 days . Or pile up 10 junk cars or something else . We had a kid in are town that was riding a dirt bike motorcycle on his parents land. It bothered a neighbor , so that neighbor keep calling the town and the cops, Finally the building inspector found a old law on the books that said any noise produced on your property must stay there. Who wrote this one I don't know . But that how they got the kid to stop riding.

With that being said If you think the guy did it to bother you. Then I would be the better man and Just forget it.

hambini
March 27th, 2009, 10:13 AM
He has nothing to complain about if he doesn't have the back bone to talk to the guy. The guy may be understanding and move his dumpsite.

mdmountainman
March 27th, 2009, 10:41 AM
Thanks for all the replies. In the end it isn't such a big deal and my father in-law isn't raging over the incident but it bothered him enough to show me what they had done.

This thread wasn't intended to justify our upset. I just wanted to raise some awareness about the little things we can do to help keep our sport and way of life palatable to those who don't hunt.

My in-law isn't the vindictive type so he won't really hold a grudge but another neighbor might have and we as hunters can't afford to be so cavalier.

I am not complaining just pointing out an instance where some common sense and communication (on both parties part) could have avoided some upset and might have even fostered a friendship.

I think it comes down to people being considerate of their neighbors. This is a lost art for many.

HOKIEHUNTER07
March 27th, 2009, 10:57 AM
Well It's great that your in-law insn't that upset, but I really think the courtesey goes both ways. I mean if your FIL just says, "I see you've had a good season... *blah blah blah for a little while* I don't mean to be a bother or anything, but those carcuses are attracking a lot of ______ (bees, animals, etc) and there a bit of a pain while I'm doing some chores around the property. Is ther any way you could dump the deer a bit deeper in the woods in another spot? I sure would appreciate it. Thanks, have a good day!"

The respect goes both ways. Hard to no if you're bothering someone (sometimes) if they don't let you know in a POLITE manner.

Hope it all works out!

Skeptic
March 27th, 2009, 11:55 AM
Thanks for all the replies. In the end it isn't such a big deal and my father in-law isn't raging over the incident but it bothered him enough to show me what they had done.

This thread wasn't intended to justify our upset. I just wanted to raise some awareness about the little things we can do to help keep our sport and way of life palatable to those who don't hunt.

My in-law isn't the vindictive type so he won't really hold a grudge but another neighbor might have and we as hunters can't afford to be so cavalier.

I am not complaining just pointing out an instance where some common sense and communication (on both parties part) could have avoided some upset and might have even fostered a friendship.

I think it comes down to people being considerate of their neighbors. This is a lost art for many.

So how is it being considerate of your neighbor to come online and bash him and what he is doing to the whole word......when you haven't evening talked to him about it???????

Heck, I'd bet he doesn't even realize he upset your FIL, and how the heck is he supposed to if YOU don't tell him!????

As far as ......

but another neighbor might have and we as hunters can't afford to be so cavalier
I completely disagree! He has done NOTHING wrong(unless its' something illegal but I'm not familiar with your states laws). We(hunters) need to be proud of what we do and STAND up for what and why we're doing! YOU have no room to complain about the situation when YOU have not done your part and talked to the neighbor! Could easily be just mention it to him and he'll take care of it. You haven't even given him the chance.

SunRiverMan
March 27th, 2009, 12:04 PM
"Now the neighbor a hunter decides to dump about 15 carved up deer carcasses,"

This should be a warning sign. Your neighbor is slob hunter. Where can you kill that many deer? He may be processing meat for others or he could be poaching. I would alert the warden and ask your father-in-law's name be left out of it. It should be him since it is his property. I hope this works out well for you. SRM

SunRiverMan
March 27th, 2009, 12:07 PM
EDIT: OH and apparently one of the neighbors family members is a game warden!

I think I would just move my log splitter. There is something wrong going on here. I do not like fighting with neighbors. Sorry. SRM

crazy wolf
March 27th, 2009, 12:27 PM
A line has been drawn by two men that do not understand one another. If neither one man can speak, who will be the first to build a wall.



Crazy Wolf.

Southern Hunter
March 27th, 2009, 12:59 PM
I don't understand how you don't see this as a problem. As hunters it is all our problems. Every one of us need to be aware of how the non hunters view us. No one is ever going to change the mind of a tree hugger, however; The non hunters are very important. Non hunters are about 86% of the population and some of us call them voters. If we can change where whe leave the remains of our kills to make some one happy then by allmeans it is what we should do. We have to share the world and get along with the majority who does not hunt or they are going to take our privladge away.

This is so far out of left field it's funny...

First.. it's not a problem for the hunter.. Why? Because no one has complained to him... have they..! So why would he change anything until someone says there is a problem. The non hunter thing is unbelievable... just because you dump a carcass.. What else would you do with it? Place it so a Anti hunter will view it? Look, if the guy doesn't call up and complain the the hunter may not know it's a problem.. you guy's are jumping the gun here so to speak...Why are you are so scared of being a hunter? why are you worried about the non hunters.. be proud you didn't leave any meat on the bones for waste...be proud you killed a decent animal that will feed your family and possibly others too.. wear that camo in public.. let people know who and what you are... get out of the damn closet and quit being so damn scared of being what you are...
I am a hunter, and proud of it...I will kill for food...
Southern Hunter

wtwilli
March 27th, 2009, 01:52 PM
I'd call the guy and ask him to please not dump his carcasses near the property line.I would tell him I'm spilting wood right there and the smell is killing me.I he gives you crap tell him your call the board of health.Good neighbors will not do this to begin with they'll dig a hole a bury them away from the property line.

mdmountainman
March 27th, 2009, 01:57 PM
I am kind of surprised at the responses here.
1. I would never dump a bunch of carcasses near where I knew a neighbor was working.
2. If it were my property I would certainly say something.
3. I understand why my In Law doesn't want to speak to him given his obvious indifference to the feelings of his neighbors
4. I have no problem with the fact that I hunt, he hunts, whoever wants to hunt.
5. A little courtesy when disposing of dead animals shouldn't have to be asked for in my opinion.

I haven't said anything because my in law asked me not to. However anyone that can say they would dump that many carcasses that close to someones work area and not know they were doing something wrong, has problems.

mdmountainman
March 27th, 2009, 01:57 PM
I'd call the guy and ask him to please not dump his carcasses near the property line.I would tell him I'm spilting wood right there and the smell is killing me.I he gives you crap tell him your call the board of health.Good neighbors will not do this to begin with they'll dig a hole a bury them away from the property line.

Exactly.

mdmountainman
March 27th, 2009, 01:59 PM
"Now the neighbor a hunter decides to dump about 15 carved up deer carcasses,"

This should be a warning sign. Your neighbor is slob hunter. Where can you kill that many deer? He may be processing meat for others or he could be poaching. I would alert the warden and ask your father-in-law's name be left out of it. It should be him since it is his property. I hope this works out well for you. SRM

Maryland basically has no limit on does. Take as many as you like. There was one small 6 point in the pile that I could see.

Shouldernuke!
March 27th, 2009, 02:04 PM
Let ist go its not your fight nor is it a fight at all if your uncle had enough he would approach the other land owner to get them moved if that didn't work the situation is over at that point.Its between them only. :shade:

No guts no glory in the case of your uncles aproach to this.

mdmountainman
March 27th, 2009, 02:07 PM
Let ist go its not your fight nor is it a fight at all if your uncle had enough he would approach the other land owner to get them moved if that didn't work the situation is over at that point.Its between them only. :shade:


No guts no glory in the case of your uncles aproach to this.

I vent here so I can let it go. You are absolutely right.
Hopefully someone read this though, who was thinking about how to get rid of a bunch of carcasses and will do something different with them than this guy did.

gator
March 27th, 2009, 02:55 PM
At first it seems he has the right to do so. But there are many laws that prevent people from doing what they want on there land. Like most place's have zoning that would not let you put old cars out there. I know are state has laws against dumping dead deer ,they must be put back at the place of kill to be legal. I sure if you want to get nasty there is something you can do about it. Everyone thinks they can do what they want on there land but its not true, we Just rent this land from are government. If you want to test my theory. Just start running around you own land nude ,or start shooting a riffle every hour for 30 days . Or pile up 10 junk cars or something else . We had a kid in are town that was riding a dirt bike motorcycle on his parents land. It bothered a neighbor , so that neighbor keep calling the town and the cops, Finally the building inspector found a old law on the books that said any noise produced on your property must stay there. Who wrote this one I don't know . But that how they got the kid to stop riding.

With that being said If you think the guy did it to bother you. Then I would be the better man and Just forget it.


Dam, I can do ALL THAT and not have a problem, and on MY LAND to boot. The Gov't DOES NOT own it nopr am I renting from them

SunRiverMan
March 27th, 2009, 04:01 PM
I can't believe what I am reading here. Anybody that does what his neighbor did is a jerk. Those carcasses could easily be put in the trash or taken to the collection site. To just dump them on the corner of his land will draw in unwanted predators that endanger pet's and other animals.

If this is the kind of hunter any of you are then I say reap what you sow. So the next time a hunting issue comes up for vote this type of slob hunting will be remembered.

Many of you need to stay with archery golf. You have poor ethics. I'm finished ranting. SRM

30-30
March 27th, 2009, 04:59 PM
I can't believe what I am reading here. Anybody that does what his neighbor did is a jerk. Those carcasses could easily be put in the trash or taken to the collection site. To just dump them on the corner of his land will draw in unwanted predators that endanger pet's and other animals.

If this is the kind of hunter any of you are then I say reap what you sow. So the next time a hunting issue comes up for vote this type of slob hunting will be remembered.

Many of you need to stay with archery golf. You have poor ethics. I'm finished ranting. SRM


No one is saying that they would dump their own deer carcasses next to their neighbor. They are just giving the original poster the facts as to what he can do about the situation, which is either talk to the guy or let it go.

BCFrye_Kansas
March 27th, 2009, 05:04 PM
I can't believe what I am reading here. Anybody that does what his neighbor did is a jerk. Those carcasses could easily be put in the trash or taken to the collection site. To just dump them on the corner of his land will draw in unwanted predators that endanger pet's and other animals.

If this is the kind of hunter any of you are then I say reap what you sow. So the next time a hunting issue comes up for vote this type of slob hunting will be remembered.

Many of you need to stay with archery golf. You have poor ethics. I'm finished ranting. SRM

Wow, jerk huh, poor ethics? If I were so inclined I might suggest you look in the mirror.

So you're contention is that instead of dumping a carcass on a property (where nature can take it's course, and countless animals can use what's left), we should instead throw it in a landfill. Why should someone else do the dirty work. Further you contend that dumping a carcass endangers "pets and other animals", please enlighten us. The original poster made no comments about the endangering of other animals.

I dump deer carcass's on the side of the property, put a trail camera over them too. It's cool to watch nature take care of it.

Are you cool with gut piles, or should we put them in a non-biodegradable garbage bag, and pay someone to haul them away?

bigrackHack
March 27th, 2009, 05:46 PM
I can't believe what I am reading here. Anybody that does what his neighbor did is a jerk. Those carcasses could easily be put in the trash or taken to the collection site. To just dump them on the corner of his land will draw in unwanted predators that endanger pet's and other animals.

If this is the kind of hunter any of you are then I say reap what you sow. So the next time a hunting issue comes up for vote this type of slob hunting will be remembered.

Many of you need to stay with archery golf. You have poor ethics. I'm finished ranting. SRM

Can you legally throw a carcass in the trash or landfill? There are collection sites for carcasses?

I dump what's left when I process an animal. I dump it on the edge of the field and shoot predators off it. It's worked great for coyotes and the occasional bobcat. Matter of fact, my pets and other animals are better off with the predators taken out. That's unethical? :noidea:

Rolo
March 27th, 2009, 06:37 PM
I am kind of surprised at the responses here.
1. I would never dump a bunch of carcasses near where I knew a neighbor was working.
2. If it were my property I would certainly say something.
3. I understand why my In Law doesn't want to speak to him given his obvious indifference to the feelings of his neighbors
4. I have no problem with the fact that I hunt, he hunts, whoever wants to hunt.
5. A little courtesy when disposing of dead animals shouldn't have to be asked for in my opinion.

I haven't said anything because my in law asked me not to. However anyone that can say they would dump that many carcasses that close to someones work area and not know they were doing something wrong, has problems.

Not taking sides, but a reversal from the neighbors possible perspective:

1. I would never operate a log splitter near where I knew a neighbor may be hunting, or during the hunting season.

2 & 3. INeighbor may not want to speak to the IL because of his obvious indifference to the feelings of his neighbors...log splitting riht next to the boundry.

4. Does he know you hunt? Does your IL split wood when you are hunting? Do you hunt near where the wood splitting is taking place?

5. A little courtesy when splitting wood shouldn't have to be asked for in my opinion.

Just some random thoughts, and there are always 2 sides to a story, especially when the individual sides fail to communicate. Heck, for all we know the neighbor may think that your IL is an anti, and purposefully chose the location for his log splitting activities in an effort to interfere with his hunting...

superbuckeye
March 27th, 2009, 07:05 PM
This is just ridiculous to me. Communication is a key factor in being neighborly. The neighbor wasn't real considerate by putting the carcasses that close to the fenceline, but he is well within his rights, it's his property. Your FIL was inconsiderate when he put his splitter that close to the fenceline where he knows the neighbor hunts close to, but he was within his rights also, it's his property also. The only problem I see here is that your FIL didn't have the nuts to speak up when he had a problem. No situations can be resolved when you ignore the problem. As for reflecting badly on hunters, I think that is sheer nonsense. EVERYONE realizes that there are parts of animals that are disposed of, and the neighbor did nothing wrong.

DUCKORBLEED
March 27th, 2009, 07:13 PM
I'd say the disrespect is obvious. I had the a similar incident last season. The neighboring in-law of the landowner I was hunting on actually places his deer carcasses directly under my stand. He won because I took down my stand and gave up on hunting that area, But I seriously contemplated throwing the remains in his drive, heck a few years ago I would of left him on his front door! Karma usually takes it's course so no worries.

bobbie
March 27th, 2009, 07:15 PM
If this neighbour is approachable you might be able to talk to him about it,if not offer to take the remains away for him .

SunRiverMan
March 27th, 2009, 07:22 PM
Sitting back and watching this it is obvious the neighbor does not want the log splitting near the property line. He may shoot predators off his property, but is he shooting toward the father-in-law's house?

Maybe he could have made contact first. Like I said before, I would move my log splitting away from my redneck neighbors carcass pile to avoid a conflict.

This is still a poor example of what hunter's do after the shot. They live in Maryland and the not so friendly neighbor is giving hunters a bad name. If this is what most of you do then you have a ethics problem. It makes you a slob hunter.

Go ahead and help destroy hunting. That's what you support, right? SRM

jasonsmeg
March 27th, 2009, 07:45 PM
That guy sounds like a donkey's butt in my opinion.:o:o

superbuckeye
March 27th, 2009, 07:56 PM
This is still a poor example of what hunter's do after the shot. They live in Maryland and the not so friendly neighbor is giving hunters a bad name. If this is what most of you do then you have a ethics problem. It makes you a slob hunter.

Go ahead and help destroy hunting. That's what you support, right? SRM

Are you serious? Who are you to decide what is ethical for someone else? I personally wouldn't do this where I knew my neighbor was working, but it is NOT unethical. I find your judgment of other hunters more of a hinderance to hunting than this guy leaving remains on his own property!!!

Charcuterie
March 27th, 2009, 08:45 PM
[QUOTE=mdmountainman;1054271747] This is the kind of thing that could turn someone who is otherwise indifferent to hunting into an anti-hunter!

We need to be more considerate as stewards of this sport.

Our neighbor raises Jersey cattle and when they die, they are dragged down to the property line and dumped. This way, no one has to smell them from their homes and this is perfectly legal and acceptable. The only time it is an issue is when we walk the property lines to our deer stands. I am not an anti-cattle farmer because of this and I would look at your situation the same.
I think this is a little extreme to think that this activity results in anti-hunters, but I don't know your father-in-law.

SunRiverMan
March 27th, 2009, 08:49 PM
The first hit on my search engine:

Deer Hunter Ethics (http://www.msdeer.com/larry_castle_05.html)

Hunter ethics is an important issue that deer hunters must consider. The future of our sport may ultimately depend on it. Granted, ethics are not directly a biological issue, but a growing number of ethical topics are influencing the non-hunting public's opinion of hunters.

...

A matter of serious concern to hunters and non-hunters is the problem of haphazardly disposing of deer carcasses. Already, this issue has led to legislation. Many hunters who have harvested a deer have indiscriminately dumped carcasses in creeks, on roadsides and in areas where the remains are visible to the public. This is unethical, senseless, and offensive to many people. Failing to properly dispose of a deer carcass causes all hunters to lose further respect and support from the non-hunting public. An ethical hunter and ethical groups of hunters make provisions to properly dispose of deer remains where they cannot be viewed by the public.

...

But times have changed. You will only find an occasional picture of a hunter standing beside his deer in newspapers today. Our close friends and relatives still look favorably on our hunting activities. The difference is that a growing number of the general public no longer look on the flagrant display of hunting as positive. Most of these people do not care if we hunt, they simply do not want us to flaunt our privileges nor successes in front of them.

Groups of hunters gathered along roadsides are offensive to some people. Your harvested deer, tied on your ATV in the back of your four-wheel-drive truck is offensive to some people. When public display of your harvested deer is necessary, think about the amount of visible blood. Consider how something as innocuous to us as an exposed tongue is received by a non-hunter.

Hunter fragmentation or the division of hunters as a group, is an issue of it's own but we as hunters must remain united and we can do that only when our hunting is ethical. Your hunt is still your hunt. Just remember that however you pursue deer - whether it's by archery, primitive weapons, gun-dog or gun-still - poor ethics on your part affects all deer hunters. The bottom line is that our actions as deer hunters must continue to keep non-hunters positive toward our sport. If we alienate these people and turn them into anti-hunters because of poor ethics on our part, we have failed. Hunt safe AND ethical.

Nuff said by me. SRM

mdmountainman
March 28th, 2009, 07:54 AM
[QUOTE=mdmountainman;1054271747] This is the kind of thing that could turn someone who is otherwise indifferent to hunting into an anti-hunter!

We need to be more considerate as stewards of this sport.

Our neighbor raises Jersey cattle and when they die, they are dragged down to the property line and dumped. This way, no one has to smell them from their homes and this is perfectly legal and acceptable. The only time it is an issue is when we walk the property lines to our deer stands. I am not an anti-cattle farmer because of this and I would look at your situation the same.
I think this is a little extreme to think that this activity results in anti-hunters, but I don't know your father-in-law.

Their property is huge. They picked a spot that was about as close to my in law's splitter and House by the way,that he could get.

If he had dumped them 100 yards further down his field edge, my father in law would have never known they were there.

Bowdiddly
March 28th, 2009, 08:51 AM
Ask the neighbor if he would like for you to help him dig a pit to put the deer carcasses in. Find a spot out of the way. This would help both of them.

Lonestar63
March 28th, 2009, 09:53 AM
Some of your responses have really been entertaining to say the least. :wink:

I'll bet the neighbor is on another forum talking about his anti-hunting neighbor that splits logs while he's trying to hunt.

Wonder how many pages it is?




Seriously, if they were neighbors, they should have known each other better than this by now.
Never a fence line chat? I've got the smoker going, come over and have a beer?

Maybe that's a Southern thing.

Hope it works out, but if no one is willing to communicate, i doubt that it will get better in the future.

WEEGEE
March 28th, 2009, 10:12 AM
EDIT: OH and apparently one of the neighbors family members is a game warden!
THAT EXPLAINS THAT MANY DEER ....REMEMBER ROAD KILLS THEY GET CALLED OUT TO EVERY DAY?

preyquester
March 28th, 2009, 10:19 AM
looks like a case of tit for tat to me..cut the wood before hunting season..

davydtune
March 28th, 2009, 10:57 AM
Can you legally throw a carcass in the trash or landfill? There are collection sites for carcasses?


I don't know about other states but that is where PA says you have to get rid of them, your not allowed to throw them into the woods.

mdmountainman
March 28th, 2009, 11:11 AM
Some of your responses have really been entertaining to say the least. :wink:

I'll bet the neighbor is on another forum talking about his anti-hunting neighbor that splits logs while he's trying to hunt.

Wonder how many pages it is?




Seriously, if they were neighbors, they should have known each other better than this by now.
Never a fence line chat? I've got the smoker going, come over and have a beer?

Maybe that's a Southern thing.

Hope it works out, but if no one is willing to communicate, i doubt that it will get better in the future.

I told my father in law to do just that. I am not sure why he got a bug up his butt so easy (although it could have been the rain shower of shot pellets that came down once from the goose hunting the neighbor does but that is a different matter). He doesn't even really know the neighbor. I may just go introduce myself sometime without my father in law knowing.

mdmountainman
March 28th, 2009, 11:17 AM
looks like a case of tit for tat to me..cut the wood before hunting season..

This would seem reasonable but hunting season in maryland runs from early September to late january. My father in law is older and likes to cut wood for exercise so he prefers to spread the work out through out the year. I have shot deer on his property within 75 yards of their house while they were out working in the yard. The deer have him patterned. The wood cutting doesn't bother them a bit.

The primary area that the neighbor hunts (where his food plot is) is a good 300 yards away, and over a hill, from where he is cutting wood.

I want to reiterate that this post wasn't a complaint per se. I wanted to just get everyone thinking about how we treat our neighbors especially those who may not understand the whole hunting lifestyle. My father in law allows me to hunt there because he is a good man and knows I love it. He could take it or leave it. Because of me he would be a supporter of hunting politically. If it were just the neighbors influence, who knows.

Just be considerate.

gdcpony
March 28th, 2009, 11:25 AM
I dumped mine last year mine along the edge of my property. Right next to a neighbor's hay field. Then I let the crows, yotes and other scavengers feed. I would not know there is a problem if my neighbor hadn't came over and mentioned that his daughter likes to walk up in that area and pick the berries along the edge of the woods in that area. I told him no biggie; those ones will stay, but I'll dump from now on in another place. Guess that since the berry bushes were mine I could have raised a fuss, but why. My girls play with her and the neighbor is a good guy (I gave his boy an old bow and may get them out hunting this year too).
I guess a little courtesy is allot to ask on both sides here. If no one asks then why would he change? I sometimes do things that are rude without realizing it. Many times it is so obvious I feel like an idiot for not seeing it myself. I would ask. The worst he can do is say no. You might find him a good guy and make a new friend.