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Thread: Final Arrow length vs draw length

  1. #1
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    Final Arrow length vs draw length

    I have been doing a lot of reading on traditional archery. Some is confusing and some is straight forward and has been very useful.

    One question I have is draw length vs final arrow length.
    I understand the differences between the two. Draw length is the distance from the nock bottom to the forward most part of the riser. Arrow length is the final length of the arrow.



    My question is if my draw length is 30" (which it is), should my arrow length be 30" or should it be 31" ? I am shooting a starter bow, a Martin Jaguar. It has a cutout riser and I have a NAP Center Rest Flipper for my rest.

    Any info and/or philosophy would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you!


  2. #2
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    SEC-

    Right now, you should be using 32" arrows if not full length. Simple reason is that your draw length hasn't stabilized or formalized yet. Always easier to cut a shaft down than to add length.

    General principle is that for a hunting arrow, you want about 1" of shaft sticking out past the back of the riser to protect both you and the bow from the back of the broadhead.

    For target work, it's not so clear. A lot of people use arrow lengths SHORTER than their draw length (think about rest position and you'll see how).

    Lastly, and I mean LASTLY, a lot of trad types use arrow length to tune the dynamic spine. If you're using carbon or in some cases wood, you many have to -and it is a valid method. With aluminum arrows and modern bows, it really is a last resort. given the number of shaft sizes and tuning parameters on the bow itself.

    In your case, once your form has stabilized and you're ready to tune, I'd suggest cutting the arrows to the length you want and work the bow to tune.

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by SEC View Post
    IDraw length is the distance from the nock bottom to the forward most part of the riser.
    Don't bank on it, measure it!

    According to the standard AMO method - draw length setting can only be found by measuring the distance between the groove of the nock - to a position 1 3/4" forward from the pivot point of the grip (or the Berger Button/Hole) which may or may NOT be at the outer edge of the bow's riser.
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  4. #4
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    Sandy -

    Actually - No.

    That's the AMO std for manufacturers (some of whom don't even pay attention to it). AMO/ATA still recommends to the back of the shelf/riser for shops and end users. (Unless they changed it this year). The fact is, in most cases the difference is a fraction of an inch and effectively meaningless.

    In the case of SEC and most bow hunters, the distance from the back of the riser and his hand, to the back of the broadhead is more critical.

    Some folk worry about the difference, but I gotta tell ya, I don't.

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Viper1 View Post
    SEC-

    Right now, you should be using 32" arrows if not full length. Simple reason is that your draw length hasn't stabilized or formalized yet. Always easier to cut a shaft down than to add length.

    General principle is that for a hunting arrow, you want about 1" of shaft sticking out past the back of the riser to protect both you and the bow from the back of the broadhead.

    For target work, it's not so clear. A lot of people use arrow lengths SHORTER than their draw length (think about rest position and you'll see how).

    Lastly, and I mean LASTLY, a lot of trad types use arrow length to tune the dynamic spine. If you're using carbon or in some cases wood, you many have to -and it is a valid method. With aluminum arrows and modern bows, it really is a last resort. given the number of shaft sizes and tuning parameters on the bow itself.

    In your case, once your form has stabilized and you're ready to tune, I'd suggest cutting the arrows to the length you want and work the bow to tune.

    Viper1 out.

    Viper - I think I understand...and agree.
    My stats...I am 6'5" and weigh about 275, 49 years old. Was a D-1 college athlete and have been shooting bows off and on for 40 years. Started with a cheap recurve early on and went to a compound about 20 years ago. I shot fingers for years and then went to release...have been very successful shooting compound...but want to try a greater challenge, which this is!

    My compound bow (w/ release) draw length is 32" and I shoot 31.5" arrows. Thinking that I would lose about 1" for fingers, I figured that over time I would be at a 31" draw. I started at about 29" and have moved to 30" in about 3 weeks.

    Now, using the Stu Miller calculator...for starter arrows...if I used 2512 X 33" with 125 gr points with 30 gr insert, feathers, nock, etc... it calcs to 70.9. On the other side, a 45 lb bow x 28", 30" draw, -1/8 center cut, FF strings, it calcs to 70.1. The reason I picked 2512's is that I already have them from shooting indoor spots with a compound

    Would this be a good start until my draw length and anchor point get set? Or do you have a better suggestion?

    Thank you for any ideas!

  6. #6
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    Hate to hijack but can someone give a quick bow anatomy lesson. From the post thus far it looks like the "back" of the riser is facing the target and the "front" of the riser is facing the archer. Is the correct because it's a little counterintuitive.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TXJIMWA View Post
    Hate to hijack but can someone give a quick bow anatomy lesson. From the post thus far it looks like the "back" of the riser is facing the target and the "front" of the riser is facing the archer. Is the correct because it's a little counterintuitive.
    The back of the bow is the side furthest from the shooter, facing the target. Pick up your bow and hold it out in front of you. Now, think of the bow as a person. When you're standing in front of a person, you're looking at their belly/front side and their backside is turned away from you.


  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Wilson View Post
    The back of the bow is the side furthest from the shooter, facing the target. Pick up your bow and hold it out in front of you. Now, think of the bow as a person. When you're standing in front of a person, you're looking at their belly/front side and their backside is turned away from you.

    Thanks, that clears it up.
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  9. #9
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    SEC -

    Right now DEFINITELY go with full length arrows, unless you are very sure about your draw length on a stickbow. (I've seen 6'5" guys run the gamut form 30" to nearly off the scale.)

    If you're talking about a 45# @ 28" bow, it will be at least 50# at 30". The std reg for a 29" arrow is a 1916, but going to 32" would put you around a 2117 (.400" deflection). However the 2512 "should be" too stiff at 32", if they are full length (assuming 34"). might be a little closer.

    Bottom line - if the ain't coming out sideways, use 'em. Once you get to a point where you can start tuning, the bow will tell you what it wants. That's the only answer that counts.

    A bigger concern would be the bow stacking. Before that happens, the odds are they limbs will be over stressed; while not usually dangerous, it can make tuning impossible, due to false data.

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

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