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Thread: Question about arrow knocks

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Question about arrow knocks

    How tight should my arrow knocks be on the string? Mine go on with an
    audible "click". I can turn the bow 90 degrees with the arrow facing
    down and shake the bow up and down and the arrow will not fall off.
    I seem to remember reading somewhere that the knocks shouldn't
    be that tight. If that is too tight what is the best way to relieve the
    knock? Nail file? I'm thinking if the knocks are too tight it could affect
    arrow flight, consistancy, and accuracy. Any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks



    Robert


  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Robert -

    Try a search! Seriously, it's been painfully gone over TOO MANY times.

    Reader's Digest version(s), regarding snap nocks:

    1. Textbook - the nock should support slightly more than the weight of the arrow.

    2. Reality - unless you have to use both hands to nock an arrow while your friend holds the bow, you're probably fine.

    3. MY PERSONAL VERSION: Tighter than 1, but not as tight as 2. I want a secure grab on the string. Not a fan of dry fires.

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

  3. #3
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    Thanks Viper. Sorry for being redundant. I'll try the search first next time.

    Robert

  4. #4

    Nock tightness

    Hi....

    While we have a search function here, and the "experts" here are too tired to respond to a newbies question because there is SO MUCH cutting edge stuff out there for them to be devoting their precious time to, I would encourage the experts here to do that very search.... start with NOCK TIGHTNESS. Then, I'd like to know which ones of the entire first page they would suggest you go to rather than just answer your question.

    Is this a pet peeve of mine... YES. If you're going to take the time to tell someone to search for something, how about just giving them YOUR answer.

    Aloha...

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    smbob:

    This is a nock fit/adjustment method I have sucessfully used for years.

    Don't sand or file the nocks. Doing so removes material from the nock and can leave a rough surface which can cause a drag and wear your serving.

    A method that I have successfully used for years:

    1. Have your arrows and bow ready.
    2. Boil a small pan of water.
    3. Once boiling, turn down flame so that steam and bubbling ceases.
    4. Dip your nock in the hot water and stir the nock in wide circles in the water about 4 times.
    5. Immediately snap your nock onto the bowstring a few times until you FEEL just a slight snap.
    6. If nock becomes too loose, stir nock in water about 3 circles, snap nock on string and slightly pinch nock for fit.

    Proper nock fit should be when a fully loaded shaft is suspended on the string and just a slight tap on the bow makes the arrow dislodge from the string.

    When nocking an arrow, a proper fit is when you FEEL the nock engage, not when you HEAR a snap.

    Once you have determined what you believe to be a good nock fit, load and draw an arrow several times to determine that the arrow stays nocked and there is not slop in the fit.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    So Cal
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    WindWalker,
    Thanks for the great info! I appreciate it very much!

    Viper,
    No worries and no hard feelings my friend. I'm a regular on many
    forums and understand the frustration with FNG's like me. I
    have pretty broad shoulders though and didn't cry one bit when
    I read your post. Well, maybe I teared up a little.

    Robert

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    smbob:

    All of us were new to the ways at one time. Some remember; some do not.

    As for the method I posted, it is a method I have always used with consistent success. Not to mean it is the only or the best. There might be someone who uses and will post a better method.

    Some shooters build up the serving where the nock attaches with various materials. Not to say that such a method is not a good method, but I don't.

    The reason I do not, is because in time the added serving will also wear/crush, leaving me with the initial nock fit problem. Also, depending on how often you shoot, the nock itself can wear and become sloppy. It is easier for me to readjust the nock fit using the process I posted.

    You know the rule: Use the method that works best for you.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Robert -

    No worries, I figured you'd take it as it was meant.

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

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