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Thread: The Foundation Fall Mix

  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by bowhuntr311 View Post
    Anybody want to comment on tonnage per acre of this mix compared to something like a straight planting of turnips/rape mix?
    311,



    I'd rather not compare! I'm not going to say that one mix is better than another mix because they've all got their place and time. If you're really interested in tonnage, then get some triple stack corn and pour the nitrogen to it...you can yield up to 4 tons per acre!!! Brassicas with a 90 day maturity will yield more than the Foundation Fall Mix because it's the nature of the plant. I don't think any of that matters though, because each plot has it's place. I tried purple top turnips for two years and had absolutely ZERO usage by deer. Many of you guys try them and can't keep the deer out! Each has it's time and place.


    BTW, another update on the plots....I hunted over one Saturday evening and counted around 15 different does and fawns. In the past we would have a family group of around 3-4 resident does. Now it seems that other family groups relocate to our property this time of year. IME, the Foundation Mix has excellent drawing power. I'll go back this weekend and hopefully start thinning out the herd.


  2. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    578
    Hey Death bringer, my plots are coming in nice. Trying to Identify from the pics you posted. Looks a little different. Mine is younger at only 1.5 weeks. The rye and the oats I'm good on but not the others. By the way, I used oil seed radish.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    578
    Here is a 2 week old plot. and a deer that seems to like it.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #54
    Noklok,

    That plot looks like a death trap for deer! I've got a feeling we'll see it again...in a hero shot.

    You'll have to wait a couple of weeks before I'm able to identify any of those except the cereal grains. The order these usually pop up are:

    Rye is almost always #1

    Oats / Radish- both quick, but not as quick as rye

    Peas - pretty slow to germinate (Easy to identify when it gets a little older by the tendrils it uses to climb. It will climb the rye / oats)

    Clover - it's so tiny starting out it is easy to miss.

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    2,938
    Noklok in your last picture the plant on the left is your radish and the one on the right is your peas.
    Nock On TV

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Union Missouri
    Posts
    132
    Planted this mix sept.5th in s.e. Kansas, everything
    but peas are great. Why are the peas not growing like
    the rest of the mix?

  7. #57
    R&S,

    That is hard to answer.

    My first thought is this....do you have an exclusion cage up? I ask because many times the deer target peas first and virtually wipe them out. It can look to us humans like they're not doing well when they're actually doing a very good job at getting killed by browse pressure. This possiblility would be a good problem to have!

    The next thing I would think about is planting depth. Peas like to be planted below the soil level, not on top. How did you plant?

    If that is not the problem I would then start wondering about weird things like peas not liking your particular ground, strange moisture levels that affect the peas and not the rest of the mix (almost impossible), or weird pH level or soil nutrient issues.

    If none of this is the answer I would start wondering if you have made any witch doctors angry lately.

  8. #58
    I have been lax in updating this thread! Most of that is due to me not having a chance to hunt since early October.

    On October 3 I killed a mature doe in the Foundation plot. It was a 35 yard shot, clean kill, and she is now in my freezer. It was late and I didn't get pics with the doe.

    These are pics of the plot on 10/2. It had been extremely dry for a month at this point.






    Here is some proof that it works .






  9. #59
    And for those who have read this far, here is a treat. This is a piebald fawn that my Dad has been seeing in the Foundation plot. He has taken pics from the 4 wheeler on two occasions now. We are thrilled to have her. She can live on our place as long as she wants to--she's off limits.






    Probably not the place for this, but here is a very early morning pic from one of my favorite stands. Sunrises like this are a big reason why I hunt. Who but a hunter would have seen this?


  10. #60
    11/12 Update

    We've finally gotten some rain and the plots have really taken off. We now have the only green patches anywhere around.






    The radishes have really grown!










  11. #61
    The Broken Toed Ten


    The plots have worked! I took my target buck near the foundation plot this morning. I saw this buck on 11/8 but couldn't get a shot. The activity shut down until this morning when I got another chance at him. This is a muzzleloader kill.

    I cut this deer's stomach open while field dressing and was able to positively identify a radish leaf.

    Here he is last year.



    And this year....he added a kicker off the G2 and grew the passenger side G4.



    What he looked like when I walked up for the first time.







    I couldn't be happier to take this buck. I was after him last year, but couldn't connect. I got pretty down earlier this week when I missed another opportunity and really didn't think it would come together.

    BTW, I guessed him at 4.5 last year and 5.5 this year. He weighed 180 field dressed and gross scored at around 141. For reference my biggest previous buck from this area was 5.5 + years old, grossed 119 and weighed 150 dressed.

    Why do I call him the Broken Toed Ten?

    He left some huge and unique tracks in the plots that I'll sure miss seeing.




  12. #62
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    in a roadside ditch
    Posts
    10,204
    Wow!!!! Awesome buck Nathan! Congrats to you! YOur plots look great too. All the hard work you put into it really paid off.

    My plots never really took off. I planted this, but never got the rain that they needed. I tried to water them a few times, and it helped, but only in spots. So those spots got drilled very hard. They are starting to come on pretty good now, but are stunted and I will be surprised if they recover to do much.

    Guess no matter what you do, bottom line is, you have to have enough rain.
    Its not what I do.........Its who I am..

    hire - drive - buy - be

    AMERICAN

  13. #63
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    578
    Congrats on a great deer!

  14. #64
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Central MN
    Posts
    983
    Great buck. The hard work definatly pays off.
    Last edited by bowhuntr311; November 15th, 2010 at 11:24 AM.

  15. #65
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    KENTUCKY
    Posts
    1,959
    How well wood this grow in a semi shaded area???
    08 BowTech Allegiance

  16. #66
    Thanks guys! That buck has been the boss in the area for a couple years now so I bet the other bucks are breathing a sigh of relief.

    How well wood this grow in a semi shaded area???
    Muzzy, how shady are you talking about? Two, four, or six hours of sun per day? Light shade or deep shade? Is it less shady after leaf fall? How big is the plot, and what kind of equipment do you have to work it?

  17. #67
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    KENTUCKY
    Posts
    1,959
    It get around 4-6 hours of sun looking at maybe a 1/2 acre. I have a sprayer and a king kutter disc. I am going to have a bobcat come in and move some trees and take the top weeds and small brush out for me.
    08 BowTech Allegiance

  18. #68
    Muzzy,

    I would start with a chain saw. See if you can open the canopy by cutting less valuable trees such as beech, hickory, hackberry, etc. This would let more light in. If you can hinge cut smaller trees it will also create more cover around your plot which is a good thing.

    After this I would start with a fall plot of rye grain and clover only. This would be for the first year and would serve as a test to see how the plot will perform before sinking a lot of money into seed. Rye is perfect for this because it is very tough, semi shade tolerant, and will grow most anywhere.

    It would be great if you had access to a backpack leaf blower to keep the leaves off the plot during leaf fall. After the leaves are off the trees the rye will get more sun and should perform better.

  19. #69
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    481

    To share an experience....

    ....with shade. We planted rye, oats and winter peas in two strips. Strips are separated by a tree line about 30 ft wide. One side gets little afternoon sun, it being on the east side of the tree line. Thru the end of October that strip was a week to 10-days behind the strip on the west side. Fertility the same both sides. I can only attribute it to lack of sunshine! But, it grows!

  20. #70
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    KENTUCKY
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    1,959
    Quote Originally Posted by DeathBringer View Post
    Muzzy,

    I would start with a chain saw. See if you can open the canopy by cutting less valuable trees such as beech, hickory, hackberry, etc. This would let more light in. If you can hinge cut smaller trees it will also create more cover around your plot which is a good thing.

    After this I would start with a fall plot of rye grain and clover only. This would be for the first year and would serve as a test to see how the plot will perform before sinking a lot of money into seed. Rye is perfect for this because it is very tough, semi shade tolerant, and will grow most anywhere.

    It would be great if you had access to a backpack leaf blower to keep the leaves off the plot during leaf fall. After the leaves are off the trees the rye will get more sun and should perform better.
    What do you do with the stumps that are left in the plot?? I have mostly walnut trees in the plot itself. I can get a pretty good amount of sun in there after I cut a few trees. How about woods plots that don't get a lot of sun??
    08 BowTech Allegiance

  21. #71
    i would think the rye would do well in some shade... oats maybe too... but I would think the peas might struggle
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  22. #72
    Muzzy,

    How big are the walnuts? We are having some timber cut right now and walnut is the highest priced timber in our area.

    A point about walnuts....It is valuable for timber but is terrible for food plots. Mature walnuts excrete a toxin called juglone that keeps other plants from growing well. In effect they poison the ground for foodplots. Remember, the big trees do this.

    Depending on what kind of equipment you have I would probably just leave the stumps high and flag them so I wouldn't run into them with the tractor.

  23. #73
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    south east, KY
    Posts
    3,957
    Walnuts are some of the highest priced trees in any area, lumber wise. What would be a good first time plot for me and my hunting buddy? It would be grown in the end of a couple of hay fields, but I would also (if possible) like to get a couple small ones up on the ridge tops in openings in the timber. This mix looks like it is doing awesome for you guys, but should I start with something like this or a more simple (less type of seed) plot?

  24. #74
    Subscribing. I have read so much about food plots that my head is spinning. Some of you don't have food plots you have food fields or farms. From what I have read lick creek knows food plots.

  25. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by dw'struth View Post
    Walnuts are some of the highest priced trees in any area, lumber wise. What would be a good first time plot for me and my hunting buddy? It would be grown in the end of a couple of hay fields, but I would also (if possible) like to get a couple small ones up on the ridge tops in openings in the timber. This mix looks like it is doing awesome for you guys, but should I start with something like this or a more simple (less type of seed) plot?
    dw,

    This mix would do well in the hayfields. If you want to simplify it plant rye, AWP, and clover. For the openings in the woods I would go with rye and clover until I knew how things would grow.


    Quote Originally Posted by jim p View Post
    Subscribing. I have read so much about food plots that my head is spinning. Some of you don't have food plots you have food fields or farms. From what I have read lick creek knows food plots.
    Lick Creek needs to write a book. But if he did he would try to give it away instead of selling it. He is currently working on an all encompassing link for beginner plotters.

    Here it is:

    Getting Started

    This is an awesome link and all new plotters should check it out.

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