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Thread: Question on Hunting corn field in early season? Aerial pic

  1. #1
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    Question on Hunting corn field in early season? Aerial pic

    This is a 60 acre field between 2 subdivisions. The past 3 seasons it has been in beans but this year in corn. I am thinking a great place would be the intersection of the fencerow running east to west and the grassy draw as I know the deer follow these when the beans are on and should do so even more with the corn. There is a perfect tree at this intersection and I got it all set up last year so all I need to do is set the stand. Any opinions ( I know- silly question!!) or different ideas?
    Also, not sure if that field in the southeast corner is in beans or not.

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    I'm ignorant, to the best of my knowledge.


  2. #2
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    If your deer are like my deer, then they will never come out of the corn before dark.

    I would think that area planted with beans would be much better than with corn.

  3. #3
    Corn can be challenging; however, that said. It seems like you have a decent spot picked out.

    Remember with standing corn, that fingers of any kind jutting out into the corn are an absolute must to consider a set. The tiny finger above the "dr" in draw is SCREAMING. Deer will use this area frequently....if the wind is right and you can enter/exit...it will likely be a honey hole.

  4. #4
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    What about that finger of trees in North that leads into the corn. Looks like a safe zone to enter the corn too. Our field that we had last year was corn, the deer never left it until dark. This year its beans, gonna be a better year. Ours is a similar set up, but the woods was a spot between the fields and a swamp. I'd try a little deeper into the woods in the early season, 75 yds or so near a trail that leads to the corn for a second stand site as well, or for different wind directions. Good luck this year.
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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by bluelund79 View Post
    What about that finger of trees in North that leads into the corn. Looks like a safe zone to enter the corn too. Our field that we had last year was corn, the deer never left it until dark. This year its beans, gonna be a better year. Ours is a similar set up, but the woods was a spot between the fields and a swamp. I'd try a little deeper into the woods in the early season, 75 yds or so near a trail that leads to the corn for a second stand site as well, or for different wind directions. Good luck this year.
    Bingo...that finger is money.

  6. #6
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    It might be a good idea to walk the entire edge of the corn field, and look for sign. That finger does look good, but you never know.

    IMO its best to find the trail in/out of the corn, no guessing that way.

    marty

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by zap View Post
    It might be a good idea to walk the entire edge of the corn field, and look for sign. That finger does look good, but you never know.

    IMO its best to find the trail in/out of the corn, no guessing that way.

    marty
    And, you can shorten that a bit if you know of oak stands in that northern lot. I hunt this type of land exclusively in rural country, and they'll come out of that corn in the evenings and head to acorns when they're dropping.

    I also suspect you won't find THE trail. You'll find several trails. A field of that size will yield many, many entrance and exit points. Some deer will prefer certain ones; however, there will no doubt be several trails.

    That's why I prefer that finger...In my experience these fingers will hold three trails on average, and if you could look down on them, they'll form a triangle. You'll have one entering each side of that finger angling into the woods and then one, believe it or not, going across the finger...corn to corn. You want to be in that triangle's field of play, so to speak, based on wind. The corn to corn trail often has a good amount of late morning and early afternoon action, even more so as the pre-rut kicks in, if the corn is still standing.

    The other option is you'll find one main trail near the actual point and then one secondary trail. But, I can give an honest 5:1 odds that you'll find something along the lines of a triangle-formed set of trails.

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    I was refering to THE TRAIL with the BIG TRACKS.

    marty

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by zap View Post
    I was refering to THE TRAIL with the BIG TRACKS.

    marty

    Mature bucks in ag certainly have their patterns early season, but corn is a playground, even for big bucks.

    Pairing the location of the finger and the spot already picked/described by the OP, I'm a betting man that the finger is the likley location for a mature buck ambush. Nothing replaces boots on the ground, but aerials and a topo reduce the odds here....it's a good startign point for him.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by phade View Post
    Mature bucks certainly have their patterns early season, but corn is a playground, even for big bucks.
    I don't really understand what that means.

    All I am saying is that it's best to look the edge over.
    The finger looks OK on an aerial, but it could be a deep cut.
    Without a topo you cannot tell.
    If its a deep cut there won't be much activity there.
    If it rises up from the field, that would be good.
    But that also does not mean that a mature buck will be using it.

    If you look the edge over for big tracks you can determine the entry/ exit point of a mature animal. Then find a spot to set up.

    marty

  11. #11
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    Ok

    Quote Originally Posted by phade View Post
    And, you can shorten that a bit if you know of oak stands in that northern lot. I hunt this type of land exclusively in rural country, and they'll come out of that corn in the evenings and head to acorns when they're dropping.

    I also suspect you won't find THE trail. You'll find several trails. A field of that size will yield many, many entrance and exit points. Some deer will prefer certain ones; however, there will no doubt be several trails.

    That's why I prefer that finger...In my experience these fingers will hold three trails on average, and if you could look down on them, they'll form a triangle. You'll have one entering each side of that finger angling into the woods and then one, believe it or not, going across the finger...corn to corn. You want to be in that triangle's field of play, so to speak, based on wind. The corn to corn trail often has a good amount of late morning and early afternoon action, even more so as the pre-rut kicks in, if the corn is still standing.

    The other option is you'll find one main trail near the actual point and then one secondary trail. But, I can give an honest 5:1 odds that you'll find something along the lines of a triangle-formed set of trails.
    Thanks guys. You have confirmed some other ideas I had. There are a few oaks in that northeast woods on the point of a ridge. Also there is a nice funnel area just northeast of the ridge or southwest of the top right yellow boundary line and there is a great access to it.
    I also believe they bed in that woodlot in the southwest corner. It is off limits.
    I'm ignorant, to the best of my knowledge.

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    Quote Originally Posted by phade View Post
    Corn can be challenging; however, that said. It seems like you have a decent spot picked out.

    Remember with standing corn, that fingers of any kind jutting out into the corn are an absolute must to consider a set. The tiny finger above the "dr" in draw is SCREAMING. Deer will use this area frequently....if the wind is right and you can enter/exit...it will likely be a honey hole.
    what he said,they will burn this spot out

  13. #13
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    brother, I dont know about you but here in central IL this is shaping up to be the first year in a long time the corn will be out prior to our opener (oct 1). Maybe you wont have to worry about the corn........................ If thats the case just remember how much deer love those late, dry bean fields.......
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    Quote Originally Posted by pegasis0066 View Post
    If your deer are like my deer, then they will never come out of the corn before dark.

    I would think that area planted with beans would be much better than with corn.
    I film most of the deer here at the edge of the bean fields that butt up to the corn. see them out there ALL the time.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by cujrh10 View Post
    brother, I dont know about you but here in central IL this is shaping up to be the first year in a long time the corn will be out prior to our opener (oct 1). Maybe you wont have to worry about the corn........................ If thats the case just remember how much deer love those late, dry bean fields.......
    I am absofreakinlutely excited for this season. If the fall rain doesnt keep us out of the field it will be an amazing year for this state

  16. #16
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    Several things to consider are where is the water around there and when will he harvest the corn..also the rows of corn tend to be a little stunted right along the south side of a timber so that may make a good travel lane in and out of the woods..the finger is a must have a stand like 10 yards from the top...also straight east from there where the timber seem to be a little thicker...of course you need to decide AM or PM and wind direction first...the top of that finger would be a killer PM with a N/E wind blowing out into the field...JMO

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bang250 View Post
    I am absofreakinlutely excited for this season. If the fall rain doesnt keep us out of the field it will be an amazing year for this state
    You guys have to consider that this year the crops are about 10-12 days ahead of average years so corn and beans are going to be comeing out early if the weather permits..At least thats the way it is here in northern IL...you might check with the farmers where you live and see what they think...JMO

  18. #18
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    Yes

    Quote Originally Posted by bang250 View Post
    I am absofreakinlutely excited for this season. If the fall rain doesnt keep us out of the field it will be an amazing year for this state
    Yea our corn is way ahead of schedule too. Season opens Sept 25th so we'll see what the weather brings.... I grew up in eastern OH with thin strips of corn on contoured fields with larger woods so the deer routinely came from bedding in the woods into the fields- different game here.
    I'm ignorant, to the best of my knowledge.

  19. #19
    That corner all the way to the SE of the yellow box looks best. Aerial photos are a couple years old and the area directly to the east is probably thick cover or high CRP fields now, a lot of deer will be in that. I would definitely try the SE corner where those fields meet, the farthest SE corner of that yellow box again for confirmation.
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  20. #20
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    I use a 10' step ladder 15-20 yards into the corn use cornstalks to make a half *****ed blind out of it
    as stated previously find the trail with the big tracks and trashed saplings

  21. #21
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    Water

    Quote Originally Posted by birdman View Post
    Several things to consider are where is the water around there and when will he harvest the corn..also the rows of corn tend to be a little stunted right along the south side of a timber so that may make a good travel lane in and out of the woods..the finger is a must have a stand like 10 yards from the top...also straight east from there where the timber seem to be a little thicker...of course you need to decide AM or PM and wind direction first...the top of that finger would be a killer PM with a N/E wind blowing out into the field...JMO
    There is water just north of the ridge in the Northeast corner. Also that finger that is on the north of the field is just a slight draw so it is just a hair below the field elevation wise...
    I'm ignorant, to the best of my knowledge.

  22. #22
    Walk it and find sign and see what looks best. Go with that. Right north of where that hedgerow hits the property line to the eastern part of the yellow block looks good. I would bet that a lot of those does are bedding in that CRP to the east of the property and going in and out of the corn and cutting through that timber a little bit.

    This looks a lot like the properties I hunt out here, looks sweet.
    Tread softly and carry a big stick

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by bang250 View Post
    I am absofreakinlutely excited for this season. If the fall rain doesnt keep us out of the field it will be an amazing year for this state
    Yes, and this state is due for some big numbers. its been a rough last couple of years.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunter4Ever View Post
    There is water just north of the ridge in the Northeast corner. Also that finger that is on the north of the field is just a slight draw so it is just a hair below the field elevation wise...
    That means the early morning/evening thermal would be going away from the field, making it a good place for deer to enter the field from the woods.
    Mid day thermal makes it a good place for deer to exit the field.

    Hope it works out.

    marty

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by zap View Post
    I don't really understand what that means.

    All I am saying is that it's best to look the edge over.
    The finger looks OK on an aerial, but it could be a deep cut.
    Without a topo you cannot tell.
    If its a deep cut there won't be much activity there.
    If it rises up from the field, that would be good.
    But that also does not mean that a mature buck will be using it.

    If you look the edge over for big tracks you can determine the entry/ exit point of a mature animal. Then find a spot to set up.

    marty

    Mature bucks in large sections of standing corn often have less repetitve patterns in early season for several reasons.

    One is water supply, often a low spot will hold water for a while, but if it dries up, this forces the buck's hand, especially in warmer temps during the early season. Many corn fields have low spots, etc. but they vary on their ability to hold water. I've seen bucks move across a corn field overnight because of a water hole drying up. Then, when it rains, the buck returns to the original spot based on preference.

    Second is the farm itself, early season also means harvest season. On farms, such as this, things are coming up and down, things are being sprayed and fertilized. While that's no different than most situations, it's a light switch change rather than a gradual one. The finger to me represents a constant...it's going to be there while the corn is up...and if there are destination changes, the funnel is likely to be a factor. Bucks are not dumb, they know the finger represents safe movement. I think even people like the eberharts take up paper space praising the use of fingers in such situations.

    Third, while the elevation change is a factor, I'm believe the draw is that low point or going towards it...I'm not inclined to think that big of an elevation change is there in that finger for a few reasons, most of which is the sub-division due north a coupld hundred yards (if that)...they tend to frown on anything but nice flat land or at the most a gentle slope.

    Fourth, is fairly critical. Over my years of hunting ag land, it's pretty apparent that some bucks simply won't leave corn...for days, and weeks. Now, you find a hot trail right before the season starts, and you're on to something potentially...but they can also be misleading and to be honest, I'm not all that huge a fan of doing that, that close to the season. Sometimes THE trail types in this situation may have little pattern use...not wind, not food destination, etc. Sometimes, they will...you simply cannot tell unless you can observe. I spent much seat time in these spots and the % of success was often less than I felt acceptable for early season. I want 4-5X per week, not once or twice. I find many in this situation are for forays, be it social, or simply a facet of that buck's individual demeanor. Now, that's not to say that's the case all the time, because patterns are still viable, but you must be open to the idea it's hit or miss. Recent sign and old sign do not always equate to regular use, at least, to my version of it. This is difficult to explain in words, but I hope you can understand it. It's the one instance where I've found sign to not tell the whole story.

    Fifth, funnels represent a community. Although bucks will still be interested in their own deal prior to the rut, they become increasingly tolerant of other deer and start to expand their social circle. Some of the earliest active scrapes, both community and territorial, start within these fingers, and often done during day.

    As I said earlier, start with that finger...in any case, it serves as a great observation stand to adjust accordingly, but I'd put my money on it being ground zero to begin a search. You say walk that entire ground, and I say go for it, but save yourself some time and start at the finger. It's like fixing a car, start with the most obvious, cheapest fix and then work from there.

    People underestimate corn and its impact on deer, even mature buck patterns. From yours and everyone's input, I think this guy is going to be neck deep in deer this season.

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