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Thread: How long do you soak your deer meat?

  1. #1
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    How long do you soak your deer meat?

    I always soak my deer meat in a cooler of icy cold water. Usually for several days. How long do most of you do this? (If you do it at all)



  2. #2
    I usually do it for 3-5 days.. make sure you drain out all the water daily, gets rid of all the blood water that the meat is soaking in..

  3. #3
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    Most of the time 3-6 days. I have gone longer but like to stay around 4.

  4. #4
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    I've never done this. what's the purpose? I was informed years ago that you should not was the meat until just before you cook it, due to ice crystals during freezing.

  5. #5
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    Never done it either. I like to leave the deer hang out of the sun for a few days in 20-40degrees with the hide off.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowhuntr311 View Post
    Never done it either. I like to leave the deer hang out of the sun for a few days in 20-40degrees with the hide off.
    thats a little easier to do in minnesotta. I live in Va, and its common to be in the 60's or even 70's sometimes in november.

  7. #7
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    never have, heard or thought of it. i hang them when its cold enough and if its warm i qaurter them up and put them in the fridge for a little while (day or 2) depending on size
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  8. #8
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    Why would someone want to eat white deer meat?
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  9. #9
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    you do realize many of the steaks you eat in restraunts are wet aged, sometimes as much as 30 days or more. and the main reason i ask this is because i go on hunting trips, where i'm in the mountains, camping by myself for as long as a week. and just letting it hang isn't an optioin most times because of temps. so my only option is to drive out and get ice and keep it on icy water until i come out.

  10. #10
    I have done both and letting it hang or keeping it in the fridge is the way to go. Try to let it hang for 4-5 days

  11. #11
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    Never no soak needed.

  12. #12
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    Hmm: I would never soak beef and never considered soaking deer meat in water! Turkey and boar I soak in a brine solution ('specially older birds and gnarly hogs). ALWAYS soak supermarket pork and chicken because it has no flavor to begin with and who knows what touched it before I bought it! But deer meat or beef, nah...

  13. #13
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    5 to 7 days...drain it everyday and add more ice.
    Become one with nature....... Then marinate it

  14. #14
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    I usually just soak mine in salt water for a day or so before cooking, changing the water if needed, I can taste a difference when the meat is not soaked, Have always done it this way and very rarely will I get a complaint over the taste of my deer meat

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by deerslayer45 View Post
    I usually just soak mine in salt water for a day or so before cooking, changing the water if needed, I can taste a difference when the meat is not soaked, Have always done it this way and very rarely will I get a complaint over the taste of my deer meat
    How does it compare to a hung deer? Never even heard of soaking meat . . .

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  16. #16
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    I was raised soaking meat in salt water, deer, ducks, geese, squirrel, was taught it draws the blood out. When the weather allows we try to hang our deer, warmer weather we cannot and most butcher shops around here wont let em hang long because they are so buisy. I have had deer that was not soaked, and I swear I can taste a difference and prefer it soaked. Doesnt take much salt, just cover the meat with water, light dusting of salt over the meat and put in fridge for a day, then cook

  17. #17
    12volt foodsaver vacume packer will do the job for you. That is how meat is wet aged anyway.

  18. #18

    Smile soaking or hanging

    I am originally from Nebraska where it gets cold enough to hang meat in the winter, but I have lived in SOUTH Louisiana for over 15 years where it almost never gets cold enough to hang game.
    In my opinion, and it's only an opinion. Either way is acceptable. Dry aged deer do have a little bit stronger flavor and may be a small bit tenderer, but not so much so as to notice.
    Unless compared side by side and cooked under the exacting specifications with minimal seasonings, most people canít tell the difference. Itís all in the preparation of the meat. Deer have a very low fat content and canít be cooked just like beef.
    I believe the biggest thing to affect flavor is the prep of the animal. It has to be in a timely fashion, and the contents of the stomach, bowls, bladder, and whatnot should not be spilled on to the meat. It can ruin meat quickly, good shot placement is very important.
    If by chance you do make a gut shot or spill the guts when field dressing the deer, the biggest thing you can do to protect the flavor of your deer is to wash the contaminated area thoroughly and as soon as possible so that the meat is not ruined. Wash the deer down regardless after field dressing just as a precaution; this also helps to cool the carcass more quickly.
    I also believe that most people who say they donít like deer, say that because they were introduced to deer that were improperly processed.
    The real benefit to either is convenience. When in the Northern states it is easier to hang the meat and to not buy ice. In the Southern states you need the ice, especially if you are going to be in the field for any amount of time.
    Most people in the south canít afford a walk in cooler to dry age deer, so many of them will quarter up a deer and put them in coolers with the drain open on ice for 7 to 10 days to keep them cold. I have gotten kind of fond of doing it this way and enjoy the fact that I donít have to trim the dried meat off of the carcass as you do with dry ageing.
    I slaughter, butcher and process my own deer, making sausage, steaks, roasts, and burger. Iíve yet to feed any to anyone who has said they didnít like it. In fact many of them say that they could hardly tell the difference between it and beef once I cook it.
    I now live in Northern Arkansas and enjoy hunting whenever I get the opportunity and I still use the cooler and ice because most of the time it is too warm for hanging a deer here and my deer meat is always tender and good.

  19. #19
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    I seal mine in bags and cover with ice.I try not to soak mine.However we use to soak it with water and salt when I was younger.If I am trying to age it I will place it in a fridge on racks.

  20. #20
    I never have soaked.

  21. #21
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    I've done it both ways. If it's cool enough, I hang for a few days. If it's too warm, I put in a cooler with ice over it and drain daily so the water from the melting ice never completely covers the meat. Sometimes (just to experiment), I put the meat in trash bags then covered with ice. Either way, I keep it in the cooler for 2-5 days depending on how busy I am. I can't tell a difference between dry and wet curing.
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  22. #22
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    I keep mine in a cooler covered in ice with the plug pulled so the meat doesn't set in water for 5 to 7 days.

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