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Thread: Carbon Fiber Treestands

  1. #1

    Carbon Fiber Treestands

    Why are there no carbon fiber treestands on the market , or are they? I mean they would be lighter , stronger , quiter , and absolutley dominate the market IMO. Surely I'm not the only one who's thought about it before , they make arrows , car hoods , I've seen caribiner hooks , and Hoyt even makes a carbon fiber bow now , why no treestands!! There has to be some good reason , does anybody know it?



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    Price maybe?

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    treestands have to pass that tma certification. maybe they are working on it but havent got it down yet
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    Price and durability. From my road biking days I remember carbon fiber being brittle and developing stress fractures easily. It was common practice that if you got into a wreck of any sort you replace all the carbon on your bike or risk catastrophic failure. One thing that would be interesting would be to see non essential or stress bearing parts made of
    carbon.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by jre4192 View Post
    Price maybe?
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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by jre4192 View Post
    Price maybe?
    Maybe , but some aluminum ones are priced very high now and people buy them.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Jake L View Post
    Price and durability. From my road biking days I remember carbon fiber being brittle and developing stress fractures easily. It was common practice that if you got into a wreck of any sort you replace all the carbon on your bike or risk catastrophic failure. One thing that would be interesting would be to see non essential or stress bearing parts made of
    carbon.
    I thought carbon was more durable than aluminum.

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    Sounds like a great idea but as said before I think the pricetag will be very high.
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    I have one.... Made by Ol' Man treestands. It's a hang-on with a big comfy platform and its lightweight.... the seat is my favorite also. They don't make it anymore, but its my favorite treestand for 10+years now.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by bl00dtrail View Post
    I have one.... Made by Ol' Man treestands. It's a hang-on with a big comfy platform and its lightweight.... the seat is my favorite also. They don't make it anymore, but its my favorite treestand for 10+years now.
    And it's made of carbon fiber?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake L View Post
    Price and durability. From my road biking days I remember carbon fiber being brittle and developing stress fractures easily. It was common practice that if you got into a wreck of any sort you replace all the carbon on your bike or risk catastrophic failure. One thing that would be interesting would be to see non essential or stress bearing parts made of
    carbon.
    This is what I was thinking...I usually just toss my stands around and it seems like they would easily crack or chip and things would end bad when you climbed on it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bl00dtrail View Post
    I have one.... Made by Ol' Man treestands. It's a hang-on with a big comfy platform and its lightweight.... the seat is my favorite also. They don't make it anymore, but its my favorite treestand for 10+years now.
    I say an ad for one of those on ebay
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    Carbon fiber wouldn't take the beating an aluminum stand would. Tossed around in the back of a pick up truck, your aluminum stand might get a nick or dent. Carbon fiber could develop a crack you wouldn't notice until
    it snapped and you came crashing down. I would not want a carbon fiber stand.
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    Quote Originally Posted by mn5503 View Post
    Carbon fiber wouldn't take the beating an aluminum stand would. Tossed around in the back of a pick up truck, your aluminum stand might get a nick or dent. Carbon fiber could develop a crack you wouldn't notice until
    it snapped and you came crashing down. I would not want a carbon fiber stand.
    that is REASON. if you got nick in carbon, it could split.only take 1 death and lawsuits would fly.overtime who knows what happens to carbon .does it breakdown do to cold/heat and bumping around etc?

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    Ol'Man used to have a whole carbon line including lock on's and climbers but they've all been discontinued. I have a few friends that still have them and haven't had any problems. They are most definitely quieter especially if you hit something against it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BUCK-NUTS View Post
    And it's made of carbon fiber?
    Yes sir. Carbon fiber.

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    There are plenty of CFRPs (carbon fiber reinforced polymers) that are strong enough to hold up to any wear and tear you subject it to. I actually worked on a prototype when I was in college. Problem is, as some mentioned, the price of the quality CFRP needed just isn't realistic right now. This isn't the same carbon fiber that your arrows are made out of. This is the stuff that they are currently making aircraft fuselages out of (which is actually where I got the material for the prototype). It's truly amazing stuff and it makes a real nice stand if you want to pay about 10 times what you're paying now for a stand. I'm sure we'll see some stands in the future though as the prices come down.
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    They make carbon fiber mountain bikes and they take a ton of abuse and i havnt heard of any issues with them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by millerarchery View Post
    They make carbon fiber mountain bikes and they take a ton of abuse and i havnt heard of any issues with them.
    I was thinking this too but have you seen the prices on those?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bowhuntertim View Post
    I was thinking this too but have you seen the prices on those?
    yes, they are big $
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake L View Post
    Price and durability. From my road biking days I remember carbon fiber being brittle and developing stress fractures easily. It was common practice that if you got into a wreck of any sort you replace all the carbon on your bike or risk catastrophic failure. One thing that would be interesting would be to see non essential or stress bearing parts made of
    carbon.
    That stuff is usually not 100% carbon fiber weave...Its usually a plastic or metal shell with a carbon coating.

    The problem with a true 100% carbon fiber treestand would be the effort it would take to make them thus driving the cost way up.

    First you would have to have multiple molds to make the parts needed to assemble the stand. You could not make it in one complete form, true carbon fiber does not work that way. It comes in sheets much like window tint. And you build a mold and then wrap layers of the carbon on top of that mold. Then there is a process of heating in an oven, another layer, and so on and so on. And when the carbon is thick enough, the mold would have to be removed from the inside. Usually carbon molds are in long round or square in shape. so once the part is made the mold can be removed from one end. Then usually a end cap is used to plug the holes and then bolts together.

    So to build a tree stand you would need quite a few particular molds to form the platform. A hang on would be easier just because they are a pretty simple design, but a climber or ladder would be more complex and of course expensive.
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    Dang, I didn't know it was that complicated. I would definitely be willing to pay more for one but probably not as much more as it would cost to build and market one and most hunters probably wouldn't either. That was my feeling on my mountain bike. I'd have loved to have a carbon frame but just couldn't justify the SIGNIFICANTLY increased price.
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    Ol Man's climber was the Ol Man Air Elite. It wasn't 10x the cost of a regular climber. It was like $350-400. There is probably a reason the quit making them for sure.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teh Wicked View Post
    That stuff is usually not 100% carbon fiber weave...Its usually a plastic or metal shell with a carbon coating.

    The problem with a true 100% carbon fiber treestand would be the effort it would take to make them thus driving the cost way up.

    First you would have to have multiple molds to make the parts needed to assemble the stand. You could not make it in one complete form, true carbon fiber does not work that way. It comes in sheets much like window tint. And you build a mold and then wrap layers of the carbon on top of that mold. Then there is a process of heating in an oven, another layer, and so on and so on. And when the carbon is thick enough, the mold would have to be removed from the inside. Usually carbon molds are in long round or square in shape. so once the part is made the mold can be removed from one end. Then usually a end cap is used to plug the holes and then bolts together.

    So to build a tree stand you would need quite a few particular molds to form the platform. A hang on would be easier just because they are a pretty simple design, but a climber or ladder would be more complex and of course expensive.
    How is Hoyt making the CM riser so cheap now?

    I think they have found a way to make the weave of carbon limbs above and below the grip as separate pieces then they assembly with poxy and paint or camo dip and that hides the joints. I figure the layering of carbon is automated...

    I just cant see wrapping that many layers on the riser as one piece.

    How do you think they are doing it?
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    Quote Originally Posted by AppleOnMyHead View Post
    How is Hoyt making the CM riser so cheap now?

    I think they have found a way to make the weave of carbon limbs above and below the grip as separate pieces then they assembly with poxy and paint or camo dip and that hides the joints. I figure the layering of carbon is automated...

    I just cant see wrapping that many layers on the riser as one piece.

    How do you think they are doing it?
    Truth be told, I bet its a metal framed bow wrapped with Carbon....Carbon is SO much lighter than aluminum, yet the Carbon Matrix is only like 1 oz lighter than the regular old aluminum one? Call me crazy but for a unique product such as carbon it should be a ton lighter than 1 oz....

    But I dont know for sure, and im not about to spend my hard earned money and take a carbon matrix to a band saw to see whats in the middle. But it wouldnt surprise me one bit if it was a aluminum frame smaller than the original matrix, then just wrapped with carbon.

    Or it could have a Graphite core and they just leave it in there...Either way, I highly doubt the carbon matrix is 100% carbon from core to shell.
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