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Thread: Grizzly Recurve any good?

  1. #1

    Grizzly Recurve any good?

    Hey all, I'm trying to get into archery and I think I've settled on going traditional. I've been eyeballing the 2011 Grizzly from Bear Bows. I'm simply looking for opinions on this bow from some experienced shooters.

    Thank you!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Possum Trot, Kentucky, United States
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    Don't know boutthe newer ones but I love and collect the older models.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Mansfield, Ohio, United States
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    i actually just bought a grizzly recurve Thursday. its my first recurve so i cant really compare it aginst other brands and models. its not all that loud i didnt even need to put on string silencers. if you do it will probably take out some of the hand shock but its not really that bad. good shooting so far and i love it. the guy at the pro shop told me since i would be hunting with it he recommended going with a wood riser instead of aluminium. flings the arrow pretty fast from what i can tell but im no professional.

  4. #4
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    Nov 2009
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    Hey Nathan, I dont know how far your draw length will be on a recurve but if you're just starting out with recurves......I would suggest something a little longer, the Grizzly is 58 inches. The Grizzly is a good bow [dont know much about the new ones], but you could get a Samick Sage for about 130 bucks [62 inches]. It would be an economical way to learn, then after you get your form down you could go shorter. Also, you can get into an ILF setup cheaper than a new Grizzly. Not trying to sway you but I think you would be better off at first...with a longer bow, and I wouldn't get over 40 lbs to begin with. You can get a Hoyt Excel riser with T-rex limbs for under 300 bucks. The good thing about the ILF is you could upgrade in limbs later ,and not have to change risers. Also, later if you change risers, limbs, whatever, they will all interchange. But, everyone is different....you may prefer a wood rider bow, and if you do I would recommend the Samick Sage....shoots a lot better than the price reveals.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Mansfield, Ohio, United States
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    isnt the hoyt excel a magnesium riser? No offence to any one trying to help but im only 14 years old and can easily handle 58# so if you plan to hunt with this bow i would defiantly go with 50# or 55# depending on your draw and what you feel comfortable with. if your plan is to just target shoot then there is no need for a 50# bow unless thats what is most comfortable to you.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Hancock County,Indiana
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    i bet that 58 handles you

    ahh, to be young and know it all...again lol

  7. #7
    nothing wrong with the Grizzly. good bow old or new.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Ottawa ont canada
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    3,831
    start out with 30 lb limbs and get a bow you can upgrade limbs later to higher poundage.. excel riser from hoyt excellent for 149 dollars...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curve1 View Post
    Hey Nathan, I dont know how far your draw length will be on a recurve but if you're just starting out with recurves......I would suggest something a little longer, the Grizzly is 58 inches. It would be an economical way to learn, then after you get your form down you could go shorter. Also, you can get into an ILF setup cheaper than a new Grizzly. Not trying to sway you but I think you would be better off at first...with a longer bow, and I wouldn't get over 40 lbs to begin with.
    Have a question, does shooting a longer bow help with getting good form or does it make bad form shoot better? Just wondering the benefit of shooting a longer bow.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    I believe it helps beginners with the ability to control the bow [with a lower poundage bow, 35-40 lbs] more easily. A longer bow will hide poor form to a degree .imo.
    Once he developes good form, a shorter bow would be easier to master. imo. I have tried longer and shorter bows ,and for me personally, when it comes to deer killing range I think [for me] a 58-60 inch recurve works great. I only draw 28 inches. But I still say for newbies, a longer bow is better.
    If I shot a lot of competition , I would defenitely prefer a longer, heavier [mass weight] recurve. But, that's just my opinion.....once a fella masters his form, I think he can shoot bout whatever he wants [considering his draw length].
    I've done so much bow-hopping I got a lot to regroup on myself.

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