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Thread: Beginner Recurve

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Lake City, CO
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    Beginner Recurve

    Good afternoon all. I'm rather new to archery, and am interested in buying a recurve. While I don't have a ton of experience, I have fired both compound and recurve and prefer recurve due to compounds having the let off. I find it easier to aim with constant tension as opposed to the let off.
    Still, even though I have my preference, I am eager to learn and am open to other points of view. It seems that there are many of you here that really know what you're talking about and have a great deal of experience.
    As a first question, do any of you have any advice on a beginner recurve and arrows? I'm 6'2", 175lbs and of thin to athletic build, with a draw length of 30". As far as I know, I would prefer a 50-70lb draw. I should be going to Cabela's within the next few weeks to try some out, so I'm wondering what to look at. My budget is $300-$400 at most, but once I have some experience under my belt, I would like to upgrade to a better bow for the long run, and eventually a reflex bow. Mainly I am looking for an inexpensive, yet good quality recurve to start with.



  2. #2
    You might be athletic as am I but I got talked into a #50 bow (to hunt) by a compound friend in January. Shot about 100 arrows a day the first Fri., Sat. and Sun. Tuesday my left shoulder joint was all messed up ( I'm right handed). Got advice here and was told to go much lighter to develop good form and not struggle to control the bow. It was great advice! Have been shooting #26 hoyt horizon and will soon be moving to #34 limbs. Shot 260 at 20 yds. on a 40 cm target this past Sunday. My shoulders are not weak as I do work out and have been flapping my arms for 29 years six hours a day band directing. I really think a lighter bow to start is the only way to go!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    central Virginia
    Posts
    873
    The advise that I've read on these forums, which I took by the way, is to start at a draw weight 10 to 15 lbs lighter than your compound draw weight. I acctually went down 20lbs but I'm getting old. I have a 50# compound and bought a 30# recurve about 4 weeks ago and couldn't be happier. With the bow that is. My aim needs help Go light on the lbs, learn form and technique and don't get sore muscles like we've all done in the past. Good luck.
    Samick Trailblazer 68" longbow
    Hildebrand Sitka spruce shafts

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pacific Northwest Volcano Territory
    Posts
    32
    Read this book http://www.amazon.com/Shooting-Stick.../dp/1602642443 before you purchase a bow or any gear yet.

    I am a large man used to frequent daily heavy lifting of furniture, appliances, loading and unloading trucks.

    Consider myself fairly strong, however learning proper form with a bow works whole muscle groups I rarely use together at the same time.

    I had the same starting budget $300-$400.

    Chose an ILF set up, Hoyt Excel 23" riser ($175) with Samick Candidate 38# medium length recurve limbs ($90).

    If I find that I cannot consistently shoot at 40 pound draw (Minimum legal weight for game where I live) without muscle fatigue in proper form my pride will not stand in the way of ordering lighter ILF limbs.

    There are guys who blow hundreds of dollars swapping out their bows as frequently as they change socks.

    Picked an ILF rig because I can always inexpensively upgrade or downgrade limbs as needed and swap out the grip.

    Best of all an ILF take-down recurve or longbow can easily fit into a backpack and be transported along trails I frequent without setting off alarm bells among the tree hugging hippy bird watcher crowd.

    Once I reach my super secret hidden secluded out of the way spot to practice stumpin It takes only a few minutes to unpack and assemble my rig.

    Most valuable peace of advice I picked up reading several traditional archery forums this winter is do not let anyone dictate nor force their own opinion of what traditional archery gear is upon you.

    Read that book I mentioned and others.

    Educate your self first.

    Visit several shops.

    Attend some shoots and meets.

    Shoot as may types of bows as you can.

    Many shops rent traditional gear cheaply.

    Experiment with technique, form, gear, gloves, tabs, etc.

    THEN Decide what is going to adequately suit your situation to start and make modifications as YOU feel you need them.

    Last, save yourself a few headaches and buy your rig through a local shop with an experienced traditional technician.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pacific Northwest Volcano Territory
    Posts
    32
    One other thing I failed to mention, do a forum search for Cabela's before deciding to get a bow through them. Your experience may go well with them but most horror stories I have read about folks ordering improperly set up nightmare bows online have been about cabela's. I went to a Cabela's store two hours north of where I live and watched their bow tech install a clicker, peep sight, and string silencers with super glue and zip ties.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Northern Mi
    Posts
    395
    I started with a 45lb Samick Red Stag takedown, great bow for the money under $200, I agree with Gypsy find a Trad shop if possible or find trad shooters and events in your area these people can help you out! the box stores like Cabelas may have the product but their knowledge of Traditional archery is limited at best! As stated above DO not over bow yourself go with a lower draw weight and work on developing your form! Most of all have fun and enjoy the journey!
    BirchBark Rover Custom Archery Quivers
    Bama Expedition Royal "Osage" Takedown 46@28 #00027
    Bama Expedition Royal 64in 52@28 #20051
    Bama Tribute "All American" Howard Hill 50@28
    Bama Expedition Royal 64in 52@28 "Lacy"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Great Pacific NW
    Posts
    2,474
    You won't go wrong with a excel riser (23") or a used 25" riser, and a set of 32# or so limbs to start.. should be able to get them for around $200.... google shooting the stick bow, and buy it also!
    I am not Trad, I just like shooting recurves and longbows.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    2,043
    Forget Cabelas - Figure out what type of archery your into - hunting or olympic recurve stuff and ask questions from that point - both critters roam these forums, some good, some -not so much
    Forget about the 50+lb bow starting out and even after 10 years you may not like that weight

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Geonova View Post
    As a first question, do any of you have any advice on a beginner recurve and arrows?
    You should start with a bow fit for you to learn properly with based on your draw length and draw weight. An archer with a 30" draw length will generally need a longer bow between 64" - 70" depending on the manufacture. For example...Black Widow makes a short 58" recurve that they recommend for a 30" draw length. Now if you choose to go with a standard FITA type rig...you will definitely want a bow closer to 70" long, so it really depends on how the manufacture designed their particular bow.

    Quote Originally Posted by Geonova View Post
    Mainly I am looking for an inexpensive, yet good quality recurve to start with.
    Hoyt Excel is a great starter bow...especially if you're goals are based more on competitive target archery. Samick makes some good inexpensive bows with wooden risers. You can find some good used bows on eBay.

    Just determine what your goals are, what appeals to you the most, what your draw length is and what your draw weight needs to be so you can you comfortably draw and hold for about 6 to 10 sec. at anchor without struggling.

    Ray

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Lake City, CO
    Posts
    4
    I haven't been able to find a Hoyt Excel to try out, but I found a place I should be able to try a PSE. Any advice? I'm looking at a 40lb Mustang. Is there anyone in the Gunnison, CO area who I could talk to about bows?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    BC, Canada and Whidbey Island, WA
    Posts
    4,926
    Quote Originally Posted by Geonova View Post
    I haven't been able to find a Hoyt Excel to try out, but I found a place I should be able to try a PSE. Any advice? I'm looking at a 40lb Mustang. Is there anyone in the Gunnison, CO area who I could talk to about bows?
    A 40lbs bow is too heavy to start with. With a 30" draw you could bet getting +45lbs.

    An Excel isn't a complete bow, its a riser (the handle section). It uses a standard International Limb Fitting attachment system which means you can put a huge variety of different limbs on it.

    The beauty is that you can get a set of $90 lightweight limbs and shoot them until you have your form and technique down pat. By lightweight I mean a set of <30# limbs.

    Then for just a little bit more you can eventually put a set of hunting weight limbs on it and it will feel the same. Very time its actually much cheaper to buy an ILF riser with various limbs then it is to buy various bow. Plus even cheap ILF limbs outperform everything but the best bows.

    And if by chance you decide to get out of archery, the ILF equipment holds its value way better then other bows.

    -Grant

  12. #12
    I'm sure you'll hear it a 100x but I'll say it again to make sure. Start with a light bow. One option could be to get a takedown with the first set of limbs light like 35 or so, then move up heavier later. Or you could get a 40 pounder which would probably be light enough to learn and heavy enough to kill. I personally am 6'2" 270 and I shoot a 45 pounder cuz its a weight I can shoot comfortably and enjoy shooting it. Good luck with your search, stickbows are addicting.

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