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Thread: Recurve using a release

  1. #1
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    Recurve using a release

    Using a release with my recurve I have shrunk my group size and has made it easier to anchor. Has any one else tried it? Thoughts?



  2. #2
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    I have a feeling you're a target shooter and not a bowhunter. In bowhunting, if you have to cant your bow in the 1 or 2 o'clock position to avoid a low limb while taking a shot at a deer, I think you'll have a problem accuracy wise using a release.
    Blacktail TD Recurve: 66", 42# @ 30". BS: 12StrDyna97. BrcHt: 7 1/2". Arrow: 32", 2212. PW: 75 Grains. AW: 421 Grains. SPD: 185 fps. GPP: 10.02
    Blacktail TD Recurve: 66", 37# @ 30". BS: 12StrDyna97. BrcHt: 7 5/8". Arrow: 32", 2212. PW: 75 Grains. AW: 421 Grains. SPD: 174 fps. GPP: 11.37

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Night Wing View Post
    I have a feeling you're a target shooter and not a bowhunter. In bowhunting, if you have to cant your bow in the 1 or 2 o'clock position to avoid a low limb while taking a shot at a deer, I think you'll have a problem accuracy wise using a release.
    Has nothing to do with being a hunter or a target shooter.

    Many hunters use releases on traditional equipment.

    The main difference between traditional equipment and compounds is the way the string is released.

    If a person uses a release aid, their groups should shrink considerably. A release gets rid of the finger errors and abnormalities upon release of the string. Thus, making a much tighter group.

    tnfob, Use that release if you want to. . .enjoy it to the utmost degree. There is nothing wrong with using a release with any bow out there, including traditional bows of all kinds. It doesn't make you any less of a hunter, or any less of a target shooter. It is a device that helps you improve your score, and that is what counts. We have been using release aids for decades.

    Dwayne
    Barebow attitude: I sure hope I hit that bullseye!
    Compound attitude:I sure hope I dont miss that bullseye!
    Archers Attitude:I sure hope I can help this guy hit the bullseye.
    If shooting a Doe is pointless, Is the shooting of a Buck a way of racking up points?

  4. #4
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    Release aids came about long ago, in the shape of thumb rings. Some still use them on horse bows.

    I know a fellow that uses a release aid with his recurve due to some damage to his fingers--nerve damage, I think.

    I've tinkered with it, but won't use one unless I have some kind of damage to my hand, for two reasons.

    #1, I like to shoot in tournaments, and release aids are not allowed at most traditional tournaments.

    #2, One of the main reasons I switched over to traditional gear was because there were fewer things to break/loose/forget/maintain. A few years ago I was on a moose hunt in Canada and one of the hunters couldn't shoot because he'd forgotten his release aid in camp.

    If you like it and don't plan to shoot in tournaments, more power to you.

    Chad
    Support the Future of Archery--Support the NASP

  5. #5
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    Im dont shoot any tournaments. I started shooting traditional about 6 years ago and was trying new things to help me make a better shot even a d loop and release. Sure some may thing its not that traditional but I shoot the way I do because thats what I like. I can shoot fingers well also. In a hunting situation 25 yds or closer for me. Just throwing some ideas out there of different things to try or new thing to try out for fun.

  6. #6
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    Yup…a number of years ago I had finger tendon damage on my string hand and had to use a release so that I could draw the bow using my wrist. Definitely easier to shoot consistently tight groups, even with the bow canted, and it probably doubled the normal amount of arrow repairs. Personally, I’m happy it didn’t last too long and am content just to destroy arrows the old-fashioned way. But, no worries at all…as long as it brings you enjoyment, go for it. Rick.
    The best book I ever read on human behavior was about training dogs

  7. #7
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    As a long time recurve/longbow hunter I was in a bad way after cutting the fingertip pad off of my drawing hand middle finger. It was three days before the start of a trip of a lifetime to Iowa.

    The surgeon was a bowhunter (compound) and suggested I try a release. I did. I also missed two bucks (one at a time) one of which was a buck of a lifetime for this native of Florida.

    Like has been suggested you may run into events where the release is not allowed but if you want to use one by all means give it a go.

  8. #8
    A modern finger tab is a release aid if you get right down to it. I went through a period where I had pain in my fingers. I used a release on recurves that were cut past center, even tried a D loop. It is eaiser and allows you to shoot a wider range of arrow spine. On bows that are cut less than center it's not a good idea, you need the pardox introduced by a finger release to make these type bows shoot well. I eventually saw it as a gaget that was useful on a narrow range of the bows I own and went back to fingers.

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