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Thread: Do arrows go bad?

  1. #1
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    Do arrows go bad?

    This might be a stupid question to some, so excuse my ignorance.

    I was wondering, if carbon arrows have a "shelf life" so to speak. I noticed while flexing some of my GT's that some seem to physically feel more stiff than others, yet they are all 5575's.



    I know the fibers are bonded with an adhesive, and was curious if the adhesive actually breaks down over time.

    I leave my arrows in the garage.(bow stays inside) I wondered if heat had an affect on them too?

    I did search and came up with moot. Though I did hear some speculate using acetone to clean arrows can break down the bond that holds fibers together.


  2. #2
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    I keep my stuff indoors unless I'm shooting. I do think over warming the arrows, like in a garage in the summer, repeatedly has a SLIGHT impact on the glue but...... One time, back when Beman were "new", I had a set of Bemans that I had for over 6 years and they were still shooting good when I sold them.
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  3. #3
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    Yeah I wasnt too sure.

  4. #4
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    That is a good question Codykrr, I have some Gold Tips that are a few years old and still shoot exactly the same as my newly made arrows. These have not been left in the heat so I guess that dont answer your question but from what I can tell mine are just fine, leaving one in the heat sounds like a nice test to run on an older buggered up arrow.
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  5. #5
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    I don't care how old my arrows are because I am not good enough to notice any difference but the top Olympic archers use new arrows for important shoots.

  6. #6
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    i would be suspect of any that have been exposed to extreme heat for a significant time, but if they pass the flex test i don't see any problems, i thing many years of constant use and flexing will have more of a negative effect on them.

  7. #7
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    Well my garage doesnt get too hot. maybe 75F. Just seemed to me that some flexed easier than others. I was mainly just curious. I know adhesives do indeed break down over time, and Id imagine the constant flexing, and just plain shooting them can eventually make the bond weaker.

    Thanks though, like I said I was mainly curious.

    I will be getting some kinetic's soon enough, so wont have to worry about the one's I have know for too much longer.

  8. #8
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    i asked this question before a while back and some guys said they think they can wear out after time but i think from my experiences it takes hitting a hard target or arrows hitting eachother to really wear them out. i have some older goldtips that do feel a little weaker spined than my new ones (same spine arrows) but they shoot the same. i have had some of them for over 5 years and they shoot right with my new arrows very consistent. as long as you dont let them sit in the sun or abuse them i think they will be fine. i always observe all my arrows for cracks and such tho.

  9. #9
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    ^ yeah, I flex my arrows a lot. Id hate to have one go through my hand....I am not going to lie, I dont think I would be able to shoot again if I went through that. Its always in the back of my head anyway.

  10. #10
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    They are good or they are broke-------period. I have NEVER seen a carbon fail because of age------abuse yes, age no. Inspect them often-----especially if they hit each other or something hard. Discard suspect arrows. When in doubt throw out. I have some that are over 10 years old and shoot every bit as good as new ones. Acetone is still a good cleaner if wiped on. But if left to soak for many hours in it not good.
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  11. #11
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    I check the fletchings on my arrows regularly. I also, look for splinters on the shafts. That's about it. I'm sure extremely hot weather will have an affect on the shafts too.
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  12. #12
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    I've had some Maxima 250's that had been shot so much that the paint lable was nearly gone.

    I just keep on flexin and shootin until I break an arrow or there are some pretty bad nicks in them.

    One thing that I found out from experience is whenever I shoot outside and its really cold, I tend to break more arrows.

    Dale is right again, there either broken or there not. That is unless they have some serious nicks in them to where I no longer take the gamble.

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  13. #13
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    I got some old carbon bemans with the big outserts like the new victory VAP's. not sure how old they actually are but they appear to be fine i flexed them and shot a few just for fun. worked great.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by codykrr View Post
    This might be a stupid question to some, so excuse my ignorance.

    I was wondering, if carbon arrows have a "shelf life" so to speak.

    I wondered if heat had an affect on them too?

    I did search and came up with moot. Though I did hear some speculate using acetone to clean arrows can break down the bond that holds fibers together.
    That's a reasonable concern, but actually much of a problem.

    Do a search on epoxy, and epoxide bonds for a better idea of the real hazard. Fully reacted, epoxies have very stable properties, and so does carbon fibre. You can kill the epoxy bond, the carbon, not. Epoxies are designed with specific characteristics, and you trade things like hardness, mechanical stability, thermal resistance, and chemical resistance to get the balance you need for a specific application. Epoxies for arrows need a bit of flex, moderate chemical and thermal resistance. The epoxy used for arrows has a "glass point" of about 325-350 degrees F. Above that the epoxy does a one way break down, and your shaft is dead. If you place a hot shaft in acetone, you can get a reaction that will reduce the surface bonds. You could probably leave a carbon shaft in a refrigerator immersed in acetone for a month and never hurt a thing. I strip adhesive from carbons in acetone, and I'm still shooting a set of CX's treated that way, and some of the shafts are at least ten years old, and have seen continuous use through that time.

    I have an older spine tester on my bench that I have used since the '80's. I don't use it so much to determine if arrows go bad, but to check consistancy from lot to lot on a given shaft type. I also keep that info in a notebook. Gold Tip and Beman shafts I have checked are amazingly consistant lot to lot for spine and weight, and have changed very little over the 20 or so years I've used them. Carbon Express changes shafts too often to say, but I have a huge reserve of CX 200's that I have used for about 15 years, they never change. Even shafts with several seasons of spots and 3D have no measurable changes I can detect.

    My guess is that rocks and trees will eat your carbons long before they wear out.
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  15. #15
    Arrows eventually go bad. Now crossbow arrows go bad within 40 to 60 shots. How? well this mainly applies for the new crossbows shooting around 400. the is so much friction on the nock that it wares it down till it eventually just burns a hole in the arrow.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhioHunter2010 View Post
    Arrows eventually go bad. Now crossbow arrows go bad within 40 to 60 shots. How? well this mainly applies for the new crossbows shooting around 400. the is so much friction on the nock that it wares it down till it eventually just burns a hole in the arrow.
    LMAO that is the biggest bunch of crap I've read in a long time. first off there are Very few crossbows that will reach 400fps(I sell them), second one of the very, very few that will do those speeds uses a special arrow built for their crossbow. If your going through a nock cutting into an arrow you have other very serious problems than an arrow breaking down. Like I said this is a bunch of B. S. That has no fact basis.
    Have a good day and a better hunt

  17. #17
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    have seen where for no apareant reason one or two arrows would start to fly irretically, checked everthing vanes clearance nothing different with these arrows to the rest could only put it down to spine failing.

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