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Thread: 1967 Original Allen Compound Bow

  1. #1

    1967 Original Allen Compound Bow

    In spite of the buzz that Wilbur Allen's first bow was the fiberglass limbed "Black Hunter", (6806) it was not. This is the Model 6703 that tells the story by itself because Allen Dated his models by the model number. Year first (67) then month (03). This is the most deluxe Bow Allen ever made. 2-toned wood with Hard Maple and Brazilian Rosewood accents made up the riser. Full width wood laminated limbs with the first generation idler pulley Allen and Jennings used on both their first models. This same idler was on the first bow offered ( under Allen Atchery) in the first Compound Bow ad published in Archery World July 1967. This first bow however was a joint effort between Tom Jennings and Wilbur Allen. ( looking like more of a later Jennings first generation than an Allens). I also included a photo of the same model (prototype) hanging in the Bear Museum in Florida. Thank you. Dan

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  2. #2
    Are you sure the dark wood is not mahogany? I know Allen used it in some of the 2-tone (and solid) risers and have not seen one made with rosewood.

  3. #3
    I took another good look. The darker wood has characteristics of both rosewood and mahogany. Being Allen was very simplistic with his manufacturing process and used Mohogany for most of his early risers; I would be inclined to think this is probably Mohogany as well.

  4. #4
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    In either case of the woods used, its just another confermation that compounds by allen were the first(1967).thanks dan for keeping this story alive ,and were are all the rest of the 6703 allen bow pictures out there! As we know they are scarce to find.
    THE MOMENT OF TRUTH COMES WHEN YOU RELEASE YOUR ARROW!!.

  5. #5

    original allen compound

    This is an original allen compound. #6806, ser.# 72030801.
    I have had it for a couple of years now. Bought it from an older guy in NW Wisc. on the outskirts of town. He had a collection of Bows. Should have asked the story on this bow. Tell me what you think or know about this bow. Thanks
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  6. #6
    1972 model (indicated by serial number). I believe that was the last year of production for the 6806, which was the most common of the early models but is still a neat bit of archery history. It's a good conversation piece!

  7. #7
    I bought a Allen from a friend he got it when it was first released to the market. He had never tighten the tee handles down so the bow had never been pulled when I bought it. Fact was the bow came with a used manual that was just a bunch of printed sheets with if I remember right the very first ones was a list of 40 things not to do that was sure to brake the bow. he was there for scare of it and it being the first compound anyone in our area had ever seen no one other then me had the nerve to mess with it. he got it mail order so there was no dealer to help either. I cranked it down and shot a lot of carp with it as the club wouldn't let me shoot it in tournaments.

    Don Johnson

  8. #8
    I just registered for this web site. If I can figure it out, I will post a photo of my Allen bow. A little History follows. I moved to Dallas, PA in 1965. Met a fellow named George Slinzer in a local sporting good store. I'm told he was a PA State archery champ a few times and National champ once. Don't have proof of this. I believe it was the following year, George showed me a new bow called a compound. He was the center of attention at every archery shoot he attended. There were a lot of questions about it not being legal because of mechanical devices. I had interest in a bow like this, but in those days, funds were short. I saw the small ad in the magazine where you had to send the specs for the bow you wanted built. As I was saving to order one, George had an accident with a fencing tool while fooling around with the owners son, and the tool ran up into George's arm. He had problems because of this and could no longer shoot right handed. He offered his original bow to me to raise money to order a left hand bow. I bought the bow and have had it ever since. George had it maybe two years. I had the bow for maybe two years before the Penna. Game Comm. declared it illegal to hunt with. It was made legal on 10-4-1973. This bow does not have any markings as to date of mfg. or serial # of any kind. The only markings are on the center section, right where the eye bolt comes thru. It says 30 - 45#. P9150057crpdre.jpg

  9. #9
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    7303 model
    THE MOMENT OF TRUTH COMES WHEN YOU RELEASE YOUR ARROW!!.

  10. #10

    Original Allen Compound Bow

    The bow you have is the original Allen Compound bow. This is the bow that was first offered Archery World July 1967. The fact is though that Tom Jennings built this bow for H.W. Allen. I did a post a while ago about this bow. The bow in the post however differed from this one by the side plates. The other in the post had aluminum plates as yours has the Bakelite Phenolic plates Allen used on his bows. The bow with the aluminum plates was the first bow sent to dealers to show. Jennings built the risers, limbs and eccentrics for Allen then probably shipped them (as parts only) from California to Missouri to Allen. Then Allen assembled and delivered his bow. Jennings always made Allens laminated limbs. I am not sure when allen started making the riser in the above pic but you can see how much more simple it was. Allen never made a riser as nice as yours. This riser that has the sandwiched Mohagany between Maple was the first offered Allen Compound. Jennings started building his own out of Brazilian Rosewood. You have a great piece. The first I seen with the Bakelite plates. I would guess it is a 1968 or 69. Thanks for showing it. Dan

  11. #11

    pictures

    Here is the 1967 ad and the first bow with aluminum plates.
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  12. #12
    After my computer crashed, I lost all info concerning this site and the compound. I located Tom Jennings in Honduras and was given an email for him, but he never replied. Tom passed away Feb. 2013 so any info there is lost. I have since established contact with Sherwood Schoch, who worked closely with Tom and he studied my photos and gave me a lot of info on the compound. Sherwood is probably the only living individual who can verify and give an educated estimate as to when it was mfgd. Without personally seeing the bow, he explained all the details one needs to examine, and said within 6 months, mine was made mid 1967. It definitely was one of the first 50, and possibly one of the first 10.

  13. #13
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    PM sent.

  14. #14
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    Very cool, looks similar to a bow hanging in the tattoo shop I visited I'll try and post up the pic I took of it, he thought it was an old PSE, but he was not an archer and it was given to him to hang
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    A Redneck lost in a yuppie town

  15. #15
    that bow is definitely a Jennings. sometime before 1976

  16. #16
    That is definitely a much later bow. The early bows had an "S" hook to connect to the string. I can't see the mounting of the cams, but the early models had a bolt with self locking nut. Later models had a pin with "C" clips retaining it. Early models had a metal plate welded to the side plates on both ends of the center section. Later models do not have this. On some Allen bows he added screws to the side. Jennings made bows and parts for Allen to pay for license agreement. Allen used eye bolts to adjust tension and Jennings used socket head cap bolts.

  17. #17
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    great compound bow history to read about,i purchased my first compound an allen compound in the fall 1973, i enjoyed shooting it over my recurves and longbow at that time. and within three more years the recurve and longbows in Minnesota were discounted down to $15.00 -$30.00 just to get rid of them .what a shame and i sure wished i would have brought a few more recurves then. thanks for sharing the allen and jennings compound beginning stories.Pete53

  18. #18
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    Just AT surfing and saw this. Every time I see or read of the Allen bow I'm remind Allen never saw the rewards of his design (died in car crash) and then never saw what impact his design would have on archery. Beyond doubt if not for the compound bow archery would have been set back untold years.
    Pearson MarXman, Limb Driver, Muddy Virtue HT3s, Bohning vanes, Sure Loc Challenger,
    Super Ball Peep, Stanislawski MagMicro Trio, Onyx, Blackjack and TRU Ball ST360, 30" Cartel.

  19. #19
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    I have an old Allen bow that has started to delaminate, do these old bows have any value? Mine has a pat pending #3486495. I can post pics if that helps

  20. #20
    Several pics would be helpful. Thanks Dan

  21. #21
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    See if this helps, its stamped 661 and has the patent number seen in the pics, no other markings I could find
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  22. #22
    Could you post some pics of the whole bow? Close ups on the pulleys and plates. Thanks. Dan

  23. #23
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    I will try to get another pic today, here is one of the pulley.
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  24. #24
    You have a 1971 Jennings. If you wanted to sell it , I would be interested in it for parts. Thanks Dan

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