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Thread: release trigger tension

  1. #1
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    release trigger tension

    Can someone explain to me how you know how much tension to put on the trigger? I use to shoot a ultra light trigger [ I know its bad} and Im now paying for it. I now try shooting with backtension with a trigger release and sometimes do it great but then sometimes I barely lay my finger on the trigger as Im afraid to set it off. Any recommendations?



  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacobh View Post
    Can someone explain to me how you know how much tension to put on the trigger? I use to shoot a ultra light trigger [ I know its bad} and Im now paying for it. I now try shooting with backtension with a trigger release and sometimes do it great but then sometimes I barely lay my finger on the trigger as Im afraid to set it off. Any recommendations?
    I am dealing with the same problem and it is so bad if it don't get better I am going to start shooting left handed to start from scratch (haha)

  3. #3
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    Yep I hold and hold til I cant then punch its not good

  4. #4
    If you dont have one you need a release that adjust for travel an tension..I like a stiff trigger with little to no creep..Just my thoughts
    I live by my own rules (reviewed, revised, and approved by my wife).. but still my own-

  5. #5
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    I have a rx 1 but I like to wrap my finger around the trigger but how hard should I have to pull to set it off? Thanks

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    Until you have to squeeze through the shot just keep adjusting until right for u.

  7. #7
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    I just pull into the shot. While at full draw I rest the second pad of my finger on the trigger. When I'm ready to release the arrow, I pull back on the release. That way, the shot is completely by surprise.
    The Lord Jesus Christ is our saviour. Only he can give us eternal life.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowhntng4evr View Post
    I just pull into the shot. While at full draw I rest the second pad of my finger on the trigger. When I'm ready to release the arrow, I pull back on the release. That way, the shot is completely by surprise.
    this is what Im working on but how hard do you pull to set it off

  9. #9
    Wrap that finger around that trigger like a hook with your finer....An use your back muscles to execute the shot..Its takes some work an time(an maybe a better explanation)..But by god once your on it..You will wonder why you didnt discover it sooner
    I live by my own rules (reviewed, revised, and approved by my wife).. but still my own-

  10. #10
    Find yourself a good back tension release, and learn to use it. You still have target panic and that's why your "afraid" you will set your trigger off too soon. A back tension release will cure that. I switched to one many years ago, and can now use any trigger release made, without any thought of punching the trigger. I am not saying use the back tension only, but shoot it a lot and over time, you panic will leave. That's what worked for me anyway. You can also get a trigger release with a spring for the trigger, and practice squeezing until it goes of, and surprises you. Standing about 10 feet from a target, and closing your eyes while using any release also helps. It has to become a habit.

  11. #11
    Quantitative answer is 3-4lbs on the trigger.

    Use a stringbow to get the feeling....

  12. #12
    I don't buy this concept of a "surprise" release. If you are trying to achieve consistency in execution then you create muscle memory. You will quickly learn the pressures that make the release execute. And let's be honest - it's no surprise that putting more pressure on the trigger makes the shot execute... I think that the idea of 'surprise' it is a very basic way to teach a total beginner the difference between punching and... "non-conscious" execution. I say non-conscious rather than subconscious because I don't know that it is really your subconscious executing the shot... Maybe? If we drive a car or walk using our subconscious then yeah - that part of our brain. Maybe 'non-cognitive' is better - think I've heard that term before used for this.

    Anyways... Back tension creates stability and muscle activity throughout the execution of the shot allowing for your non-cognitive/subconscious mind to correct aiming error in a way you consciously never could (because conscious thought is slow... way too slow). A non-cognitive/subconscious release prevents your conscious mind taking over during execution - basically causing a flinch.

    I think that a need for it to be a 'surprise' means that you are close to target panic/punching. If it has to be a surprise then you still haven't learnt to trust the process, and trust that your conscious mind cannot do what your non-conscious can. We use a hinge or increasing weight/'BT' release is because of this issue. Some never let go and these will always be the best release for them. Many use them to train and reinforce to their conscious that it really is a lousy second best as far as shot execution. Then, and only then, a trigger release is great because it has the advantage of minimal travel which equals minimal movement of form and structure leading to more consistency.

    Well, that's how I see it anyway...

  13. #13
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    I use the Scott Rhino XT release. You can adjust all the creep out. And between the two extra springs that come with the release and the two style triggers (one is straight and the other curves back) that also come with the release, you can custom fit it to you. I like a very stiff trigger pull and NO CREEP...this release gives both to me.
    Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms should be a convenience store...not a government agency.

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by L0ki View Post
    I don't buy this concept of a "surprise" release. If you are trying to achieve consistency in execution then you create muscle memory. You will quickly learn the pressures that make the release execute. And let's be honest - it's no surprise that putting more pressure on the trigger makes the shot execute... I think that the idea of 'surprise' it is a very basic way to teach a total beginner the difference between punching and... "non-conscious" execution. I say non-conscious rather than subconscious because I don't know that it is really your subconscious executing the shot... Maybe? If we drive a car or walk using our subconscious then yeah - that part of our brain. Maybe 'non-cognitive' is better - think I've heard that term before used for this.

    Anyways... Back tension creates stability and muscle activity throughout the execution of the shot allowing for your non-cognitive/subconscious mind to correct aiming error in a way you consciously never could (because conscious thought is slow... way too slow). A non-cognitive/subconscious release prevents your conscious mind taking over during execution - basically causing a flinch.

    I think that a need for it to be a 'surprise' means that you are close to target panic/punching. If it has to be a surprise then you still haven't learned to trust the process, and trust that your conscious mind cannot do what your non-conscious can. We use a hinge or increasing weight/'BT' release is because of this issue. Some never let go and these will always be the best release for them. Many use them to train and reinforce to their conscious that it really is a lousy second best as far as shot execution. Then, and only then, a trigger release is great because it has the advantage of minimal travel which equals minimal movement of form and structure leading to more consistency.

    Well, that's how I see it anyway...
    Sorry, that may work for you, but you're wrong on the whole concept of a surprise release. A surprise release is the most important part of the shot. If it's not a surprise release, you're punching it...that simple.
    Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms should be a convenience store...not a government agency.

    2013 Hoyt Spyder, Snow Camo w/7 pin Spot Hog Hunter/Hoyt ULTRA REST™/Fuse Sidekick stab w/Scott Rhino XT./ Orange Pro Comp Elite, Trophy Taker Rest, CBE sight, X 10 Stabilizers, Mako Pro Release

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by L0ki View Post
    I don't buy this concept of a "surprise" release. If you are trying to achieve consistency in execution then you create muscle memory. You will quickly learn the pressures that make the release execute. And let's be honest - it's no surprise that putting more pressure on the trigger makes the shot execute... I think that the idea of 'surprise' it is a very basic way to teach a total beginner the difference between punching and... "non-conscious" execution. I say non-conscious rather than subconscious because I don't know that it is really your subconscious executing the shot... Maybe? If we drive a car or walk using our subconscious then yeah - that part of our brain. Maybe 'non-cognitive' is better - think I've heard that term before used for this.

    Anyways... Back tension creates stability and muscle activity throughout the execution of the shot allowing for your non-cognitive/subconscious mind to correct aiming error in a way you consciously never could (because conscious thought is slow... way too slow). A non-cognitive/subconscious release prevents your conscious mind taking over during execution - basically causing a flinch.

    I think that a need for it to be a 'surprise' means that you are close to target panic/punching. If it has to be a surprise then you still haven't learnt to trust the process, and trust that your conscious mind cannot do what your non-conscious can. We use a hinge or increasing weight/'BT' release is because of this issue. Some never let go and these will always be the best release for them. Many use them to train and reinforce to their conscious that it really is a lousy second best as far as shot execution. Then, and only then, a trigger release is great because it has the advantage of minimal travel which equals minimal movement of form and structure leading to more consistency.

    Well, that's how I see it anyway...
    Is this a psychology class or a release thread

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by It Hoyt's View Post
    Is this a psychology class or a release thread
    It's a study in schizophrenia.
    Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms should be a convenience store...not a government agency.

    2013 Hoyt Spyder, Snow Camo w/7 pin Spot Hog Hunter/Hoyt ULTRA REST™/Fuse Sidekick stab w/Scott Rhino XT./ Orange Pro Comp Elite, Trophy Taker Rest, CBE sight, X 10 Stabilizers, Mako Pro Release

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacobh View Post
    Can someone explain to me how you know how much tension to put on the trigger? I use to shoot a ultra light trigger [ I know its bad} and Im now paying for it. I now try shooting with backtension with a trigger release and sometimes do it great but then sometimes I barely lay my finger on the trigger as Im afraid to set it off. Any recommendations?
    Like said above, you will need at least 3lbs and a zero travel (or as close as possible) trigger. I don't shoot a trigger that much anymore but when I do it's set a 5lbs. Takes a while to get used to the amount of trigger preload you will use but, if you have to shoot a trigger, it's time well spent. Although there may be more out there, the only one I could find that fit the bill was the Like Mike.

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by 1955 View Post
    Sorry, that may work for you, but you're wrong on the whole concept of a surprise release. A surprise release is the most important part of the shot. If it's not a surprise release, you're punching it...that simple.
    Maybe it depends on terminology.. But still think 'surprise' is a poor term. I don't punch because I don't controll when the shot goes off - that's 'simple'. But the shot doesn't surprise me because I'm expecting it (and my bow breaks left as it should).
    It's like watching lightning - the first one might give you a fright, but when you expect it, it no longer will despite not knowing when the next flash will be.

    For someone who does punch you can get them to draw and aim but let you trigger the shot - and that will usually make it a surprise because the puncher is a controll freak... But it will show them what it should feel like.

    All I was trying to get across is that the shot can be executed without conscious thought (without punching) and yet not be a surprise. And yes... there is a lot of psychology involved... It is the only the mind (ego) that causes target panic - a fear of letting go and trusting the process. Freud would have a field day.

    Now come sit on my couch and tell me all about it... =P

  19. #19
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    just set it off by pulling with the release strap into the trigger or should i say fish hook finger.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacobh View Post
    this is what Im working on but how hard do you pull to set it off
    It doesn't take much tension on the trigger. I just pull back slightly. You have to figure out how much tension you want with your trigger. I find, that setting the set screw on my release at half way is about right.
    The Lord Jesus Christ is our saviour. Only he can give us eternal life.

  21. #21
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    Just got a Scott rhino xt and love the options of three different springs. I use the real heavy one because I am dealing with target panic and it makes you use the hole process. Has helped tremendously and you can't punch the trigger

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by L0ki View Post
    Maybe it depends on terminology.. But still think 'surprise' is a poor term. I don't punch because I don't controll when the shot goes off - that's 'simple'. But the shot doesn't surprise me because I'm expecting it (and my bow breaks left as it should).
    It's like watching lightning - the first one might give you a fright, but when you expect it, it no longer will despite not knowing when the next flash will be.

    For someone who does punch you can get them to draw and aim but let you trigger the shot - and that will usually make it a surprise because the puncher is a controll freak... But it will show them what it should feel like.

    All I was trying to get across is that the shot can be executed without conscious thought (without punching) and yet not be a surprise. And yes... there is a lot of psychology involved... It is the only the mind (ego) that causes target panic - a fear of letting go and trusting the process. Freud would have a field day.

    Now come sit on my couch and tell me all about it... =P
    Ahhhhh. Cool.

    When I'm teaching someone to shoot for the first time, or someone who punches the trigger, I do the same thing...I have them hold and I slowly release the trigger for them. There is always a huge look of surprise on their faces!!! I then tell them that if they don't get that every time, then they're punching the trigger. Obviously, I also know that the shot is going to go off, but when is the surprise.

    And unless you're a hot chic...don't ask me to sit on the couch with you...I'm straight!
    Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms should be a convenience store...not a government agency.

    2013 Hoyt Spyder, Snow Camo w/7 pin Spot Hog Hunter/Hoyt ULTRA REST™/Fuse Sidekick stab w/Scott Rhino XT./ Orange Pro Comp Elite, Trophy Taker Rest, CBE sight, X 10 Stabilizers, Mako Pro Release

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