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Thread: Best poundage to set bow for hunting

  1. #1
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    Best poundage to set bow for hunting

    I`ve been told to set your poundage at the most you can pull comfortably. Now, do you do this when your in a tee shirt with your feet flat on the ground, or when your 20 feet up a tree dressed for cold weather and are nervous. My greatest fear is not being able to draw on a buck when he comes in. Should one set their poundage on the lite side for hunting or still set it at the most he can pull while on the ground? I have it set now so I strain a little in 3D league. If I leave it there for hunting, I think I`m in trouble.



    Bob


  2. #2
    Personally I think poundage is way over-rated. There are a lot of variables to consider. I'm 53 yrs old and can comfortably pull 65#. 70# with a little effort. My setup is set at 58 lbs. and I find I'm alot more accurate at the distances I prefer to shoot at. (15-30 yds.) I prefer accuracy over "poundage" and have not had a problem with
    with 58# while hunting. You should shoot what your comfortable with without hindering your accuracy.

  3. #3
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    My bows are 70# but I shoot them from 58# to 63# and that's pulling them back very easy. I keep them in that range because in cold weather muscles don't always work the way you want them to. I can draw very easy while up in the tree stand as well because after sitting for so long the last thing you need is not being able to pull back your bow.
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  4. #4
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    I shoot 70lbs. practice and hunting. Never have I lacked the energy to draw, regardless of how excited I was. I try to get my deer before rifle season (early nov) so I don't have to bear the extreme cold, but I'd imagine pulling 70 wearing a big suit would be difficult. Granted, you may not need 70lbs, but you should go as high as you can while maintaining comfort and repeatability.

  5. #5
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    Glad to see you are showing some.....

    .....advance thought on this topic!

    Many guys sweat, strain and "bust a gut" pulling 70 lbs. (or whatever) in the backyard on warm, summer days.....then that big buck comes in at 20 yards in mid-Novembe, 20 degrees outside, their seated 20 ft. up a tree and go thru so many damn gyrations to get to full-draw, the buck has long since left the county by the time they get it back!

    50-55 lbs. peak-weight from a modern compound is PLENTY to zip an arrow clean thru any whitetail in North America......

    Don't let ego rule your decision......or what your buddies shoot.....shoot a weight you can VERY EASILY draw in the summer (on the ground) and you'll be in great shape if Mr. Big shows up in fall/winter......

    PS......I can slowly, smoothly draw and accurately shoot an 82 lb. compound on the ground in the summer (and probably in a tree, too)....but my hunting bow pulls 68 lbs. and has never failed to get the job done.....
    Last edited by TexasGuy; March 7th, 2005 at 04:39 PM.

  6. #6
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    KD, thanks for the reply. That`s what I was hoping to hear. Last year was the first time I hunted out of a climber (Viper). I usually tried to get up to 17 to 20 feet. Standing up in a climber at 20 feet is different than the 12 foot ladder stand I used to hunt from. I was a little nervous and I was afraid I wouldn`t be able to draw the bow set at the heavier poundage. I think I`ll set it at 55 or 58#s and sight it in at 25 yards at that poundage. I never got a shot last year. Maybe I was lucky.

    Bob

  7. #7
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    All of you gentlemen are right. EGO is a bad thing. All of my hunting buddies shoot around 70#. I thought that was the way to go or your a wimp. I shoot on Thursday mornings (3D). I`m going to set it around 55# and see how I do. Thanks.

    Bob

  8. #8
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    Reply to subject

    Quote Originally Posted by RMac
    I`ve been told to set your poundage at the most you can pull comfortably. Now, do you do this when your in a tee shirt with your feet flat on the ground, or when your 20 feet up a tree dressed for cold weather and are nervous. My greatest fear is not being able to draw on a buck when he comes in. Should one set their poundage on the lite side for hunting or still set it at the most he can pull while on the ground? I have it set now so I strain a little in 3D league. If I leave it there for hunting, I think I`m in trouble.

    Bob
    ---------

    Hello
    Set in a chair and pull your bow straight back. Don't draw to the sky.

    I would say 50 to 60 lbs is a plenty.

    With the speed of the bows today.

    I shoot 52 lbs out of my Mathews Black Max.

    Later
    Unk

  9. #9
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    Macho Man

    There is a big difference when shooting in warm weather and mussel shirts, vs. shooting cold weather and all bundled up in clothes. During a long cold hunting season, it is a good idea to back the weight off; by about 5lbs., Lets face it when you hunt all day you are not practicing as you do in the summer. You are all bound up in clothes. Plus the cold steals strength. If you let ego guide you, trouble is in down road.

  10. #10
    Good stand hunter advice from an expert (not me).

    As follows:

    Sit your butt on floor, with legs straight raise toes to shoulder height, turn shoulders perpindicular to torso and pull. The most weight you are able to full draw in that position is your max number (tree stand).

  11. #11
    As metioned, Sit on the floor and draw the bow. Stick with the weight you can pull without leaving skid marks in your pants.

    I shoot 72# Ive always done so and for me im conditioned to it. I can do it in any position and any clothing/weather situation.
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  12. #12
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    I've shot 70+ lbs for 20+ years now and with the new smooth cams on today's bows its far less difficult than in the old days. If you can't draw your bow without lifting it above your head and straining you need to go down on weight. In cold weather, especially very cold weather, you can
    add about 5-10 lbs to your weight.

  13. #13
    60
    I can pull it after a good hike to my stand, in the cold, and regular stand conditions. For me it's definatly my comfort range and plenty strong enough to put any PA game down for the count.

  14. #14
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    I shoot 65 lbs and I have no trouble pulling it back when I have been sitting for 2 or 3 hours in the stand when it -15 outside.

  15. #15
    When I shoot in the spring and summer months it is more for fun.(i.e.shorts and shirts) As the weather changes, I will start to shoot more towards the hunting setup. (i.e. wear a jacket like my hunting outfit, binos hanging on me, in the treestand....ect,ect) Trying to focus on form of shooting all the time.

    my $.02

    I forgot.......practicing at a draw weight throught out the year, you will be surpise to see you might increase your draw weight or stay set and be dead on with it.
    Last edited by b0w_sniper; March 7th, 2005 at 09:16 PM.
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  16. #16
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    If all variables are in good shape, your health, strength, bow's tune, broadheads sharp, etc...... 55-60 lbs should be more than adequate to do the job.

    Good Luck!

  17. #17
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    poundage

    I've shot 64#'s w/ 65% let-off for years and never had any problems. Will be using 75% let-off for the first time this year w/ my new Hoyt, but still at 64#.
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  18. #18
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    Shoot your bow set at the weight you can let down and still control. You will find that you can draw your bow in any situation.
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  19. #19
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    I was told that a bow shoots its best when its cranked up to the highest draw weight. So, that being said, if you can't pull that back, would it be more beneficial to back it off with that particular cam, or go with the less weight cam for maximum performance? Or am I digging in to it too deeply? I tend to do that.

  20. #20
    You're hunting deer, not cape buffalo. I know women shooting 26" arrows at 40 lbs who have no trouble killing a deer. If you're shooting at least a 26" draw and at least 40 lbs draw weight, really sharp broadheads with the proper placement, will do it every time, and I mean every single time. There is no need to be any where near your maximum for whitetail, unless you are on the real low end of draw weight and draw length. What is most critical, is shot placement. Virtually everyone in the world can shoot better at lower draw weights than their maximum. Since you don't need more energy on your arrow, why not increase your accuracy with a very easy draw weight?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by DSparx
    I was told that a bow shoots its best when its cranked up to the highest draw weight. So, that being said, if you can't pull that back, would it be more beneficial to back it off with that particular cam, or go with the less weight cam for maximum performance? Or am I digging in to it too deeply? I tend to do that.
    Question: I always thought it was the limbs that controlled draw weight. Are you saying it is the cams? I didn`t know that.

    Bob

  22. #22
    Real simple-Shoot a poundage that you can comfortably pull and hold, while in a sitting position. Note comfortably...sitting...hold . I use to shoot 72 pounds. I can still shoot 72 pounds. My bows are all set at 60-62 with no loss of performance. I can draw them, hold them and let them down with no strain while sitting. I also make 80-90 percent of shots at game from a sitting position. Reasons- less movement, steadier hold, better accuracy. (For me, anyway). Try it.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMac
    Question: I always thought it was the limbs that controlled draw weight. Are you saying it is the cams? I didn`t know that.
    Yeah, well, don't go for therapy quite yet. You are correct. I typed before I thought. Thinking limbs, typing cams. The part that you change to make the drawweight different. How about that? I don't suppose it matters anyway
    Last edited by DSparx; March 8th, 2005 at 02:36 PM.

  24. #24
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by millstonesuper
    I've shot 64#'s w/ 65% let-off for years and never had any problems. Will be using 75% let-off for the first time this year w/ my new Hoyt, but still at 64#.
    Ditto , I shoot 64 lbs . with 75% let off have never had any problems pulling it back .
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  25. #25
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    I pull 70 pounds because i like a heavy arrow for a quiet bow and lots of kinetic energy.
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