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Thread: What makes a good barebow riser

  1. #1
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    What makes a good barebow riser

    I heard a lot of recommendations about barebow riser and I want to find out what criteria do you use to determine a good barebow riser. Thanks.

    Hoyt Excel riser, Hoyt Nexus riser, Spigarelli Explorer riser, Hoyt G3 limbs, S&F Premium limbs, SF Ultimate Pro limbs, Border HEX4W limbs, Spigarelli ZT rest, Beiter & Shibuya plunger


  2. #2
    traditionally barebow shooters shoot target shooter's risers
    usually the longer risers with the bigger sight window
    it's easier to tune and string walk the longer target bows
    they balance better than a short bow when you string walk

  3. #3
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    If you're talking about Barebow risers in the Barebow Div for tourney shooting, then it's a quality and well balanced riser without the need for external Stabs as BB rules restrict what you can have on your bow. A lot of dedicated Barebow Risers out there from Sky, BEST, Greenhorn Spigarelli etc, most of them are top build quality and some balance in the hand better than others. Alternative Sprorting Services based in the UK stock most of these Barebow Risers so good to compare looks/prices if youre looking for one.

    You need to be clear on what you mean exactly as we just had a totally pointless argument about the use of the word 'Barebow' only a few days ago.

  4. #4
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    Yeah Im a bit confused about what you meant as well? did you mean "barebow" as in a stick bow without a shelf? Like a yew bow stave?
    07 Hoyt Ultra Elite & Pro Elite's (spot setup)
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    Lewis Hollow, Ron Foley Custom TD Longbows
    Zippers Custom TD Longbows
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  5. #5
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    I saw a lot of threads on AP about barebow riser such as Spigarelli, my question is what makes a riser a good barebow riser. Using NFAA traditional or USAA barebow rules, what makes a good barebow riser? I personally don't string walk but I can see the advantage of a larger sight window. Other than that, what other criteria are used? Thanks.
    Hoyt Excel riser, Hoyt Nexus riser, Spigarelli Explorer riser, Hoyt G3 limbs, S&F Premium limbs, SF Ultimate Pro limbs, Border HEX4W limbs, Spigarelli ZT rest, Beiter & Shibuya plunger

  6. #6
    Barebow-
    if you mean the string walking division of field archery?
    then a large sight window, long riser, long target recurve
    and I would want an ILF riser/limbs so I could tune the tiller for the 3-under and lower hold

  7. #7
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    Let's take 'Barebow' as shooting without a sight and a longrod and V bars.

    The metal sports ILF risers produced by Hoyt, W&W, Samick and others are intended to be used with a full olympic set up - the aforementioned sights and stabilisers.

    They are intended to balance vertically and horizontally 'fully clothed'.

    Take one of these risers and shoot it 'naked' and the top limb will kick back at you. You'll also find it quite light and skittish during aiming.

    Put some weight on the lower riser and now it's easier to aim and can jump forward vertical on the release. This is the reaction that most people like.

    This is the new Spigarelli BB (B.are B.ow) riser; looks related to the 650 Club. Note the after-shot reaction.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUH-rn8ivm0



    The BB-specific risers are designed to be dual purpose, olympic recurve and BB, but make heavy OR risers. They come with weight kits to balance them for BB.

    These are integral, often shoved into holes in the lower riser.

    riser_moon.jpgmoon_arconudo.jpg

    These are Best Moon risers.


    Bernardini Risers.jpg

    These are Bernardini risers, the three on the right are target risers. From right to left, Lxor 27", Nilo 25", Nilo 23". The other two are a Cobra 21" riser and a Mamba 19" riser.
    The holes in the target risers are for the addition of weights .



    You can also come at a BB riser from the other side, the adapted OR risers. For a company with a derisory attitude to BB a lot of Hoyt risers will make decent BB risers.

    The Gold Medalist, Elan, Matrix, Nexus and recently the FRX have been campaigned successfully.

    AR1.jpg

    Andrew Rees, GB field archery team, shooting an Elan, with a brass weight.


    But note the aftershot reaction:

    AR2.jpg

    It's personal preference but I'd like more weight down low.

    At any BB competition you'll see any of the OR risers adapted to BB by using screw in weights.

    Bobby and Sergio.jpg

    Sergio Cassiani, Italy with a W&W Exfeel and in the backround Bobby Larsson, Sweden, with a Spigarelli 2001 VBS (BB riser).

    Zane Smith 47 lb bow.jpg

    Zane Smith, US, with a W&W NXpert and Guiseppe Seimandi, Italy, with a Greenhorn Sirius (the new fad in BB risers for FITA).

    The screw in weights can be locally made or bought from archery suppliers, Spigarelli do chrome weights in 190, 250 and 350 gm.

  8. #8
    Sky make a very nice 25" Riser ... its a sweet piece of gear .

  9. #9
    great post Greysides

  10. #10
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    Greysides, thank you for the detailed explanations and illustrations. I appreciate your contribution.

    Now, a couple of follow up questions:
    1) What characteristics make an OR a candidate for BB duty?
    2) How does one go about making some home-grown weight kit to convert an OR into a poorman's BB?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by beerbudget View Post

    1) What characteristics make an OR a candidate for BB duty?
    There are probably technical factors that influence that, such as the position of the pivot point relative to the length of the riser and the weight distribution top v. bottom; maybe deflex v, reflex.
    However, I'd be getting in over my head to try to explain any further. There are bound to be others with more experience to comment on that.

    There is a discussion here that should help explain.

    For me, at least, it comes down to total weight and aftershot reaction. I need to put some weight on the riser to get the balance as I like it but I don't want the overall weight too heavy.
    Some risers may require more weight than others to balance. I would look to what others are shooting and comments on the www to help me chose.
    FWIW, my first BB riser was/is a GM with either 350g down low or with an extra 250g. The obvious difference is the weight and steadiness in the bow arm but it changes the shot reaction too.
    I stringwalk so the shot reaction can vary with the crawl but with more weight down low it tends to roll forward a bit more than just jump.
    How you hook the string or the grip you use will play with this too so it is a personal choice.

    Other things to remember:
    When you choose a riser you also choose a grip. Unless you go custom.
    It was harder for me to find a grip I was happy with than it was to find a riser to shoot BB. This would be one of the benefits of 'try before you buy'.
    It's also important to check how many holes are in the riser...................
    The Samick Agulla has only one hole above the shelf- you may wish for a separate hole for the plunger and arrow rest.
    The Hoyt Horizon doesn't have a lower stab bushing to put a weight into, and a bushing is better than a threaded hole.
    If you want to shoot FITA field, avoid the TEC bar risers, they won't go through the 12.2cm barebow ring.
    Other shooting codes will allow the integral weights in BB but not screw ins.


    2) How does one go about making some home-grown weight kit to convert an OR into a poorman's BB?
    You don't need to. (Potato's of the world have just let out a huge sigh of relief!)

    http://www.lancasterarchery.com/cata...eight&x=38&y=8

    Lancaster sell them at reasonable prices.

    Otherwise, get an engineering shop to make them for you (5/16" X 24 thread). Brass seems to be popular for custom made ones.

    BTW, adding extra weight will affect tune. More riser weight, arrows show stiff. You need to tune with the riser in its finished state.



    This is my GM is full combat mode:

    GM on bed.jpg

    1.765 Kg

    My Best Moon:

    Image0641.jpg

    1.890 Kg

  12. #12
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    Thank you once again Greysides. You just gave me ideas for my next toy!

  13. #13
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    For NFAA traditional you cannot add any external weight except for a quiver

  14. #14
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    Greysides, about your 1.765 Kg (3.89 lbs) Hoyt Gold Medalist - how much of that weight is riser / and added weight?

    Riser + 350 gram weight = 1.765 Kg?

    I got one recently and love the way it shoots - looks like the same limbs, too.

  15. #15
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    thanks greysides.
    those bernadinis look nice.
    so do your GM and best moon, (and the green curtains)
    have a good weekend.

  16. #16
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    The Bernardini's are SUPERB.....I had a limited edition 25" Nilo "Luxor", and I made brass weights that fit into the holes in the riser...it was the best riser that I've ever shot or owned....Due to thinking that the grass was greener and all that, I traded it....Extremely dumb move on my part.....Take care............Jim
    Those who separate Politics, and Morality, will never understand either one....John Viscount Morley

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arrowwood View Post
    Greysides, about your 1.765 Kg (3.89 lbs) Hoyt Gold Medalist - how much of that weight is riser / and added weight?

    Riser + 350 gram weight = 1.765 Kg?

    I got one recently and love the way it shoots - looks like the same limbs, too.
    GM riser 1.165 Kg. Two additional weights, 250 and 350g bringing weight to 1.765 Kg.

    I found the basic w/g KAP Winstorms to be good limbs.

  18. #18
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    Thanks Greysides for an excellent lesson on barebow riser, I can't wait to get a new one to try. In your opinion, what is the best riser for both barebow and OR if I don't want to invest in 2 different risers? Thanks again.
    Hoyt Excel riser, Hoyt Nexus riser, Spigarelli Explorer riser, Hoyt G3 limbs, S&F Premium limbs, SF Ultimate Pro limbs, Border HEX4W limbs, Spigarelli ZT rest, Beiter & Shibuya plunger

  19. #19
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    R-Y, I don't have that much experience with different risers.

    A certain amount depends on what weight of riser you like. A BB riser without weights fitted as an OR could be quite heavy.
    A chance to try a riser (shoot a riser) gives a chance to try out both grip and weight.
    Some risers are noted as having a snappy/chrisp aftershot and others a duller reaction- even within the Hoyt stable.
    Then there there's the mullah...... how much have you to spend?

    I don't think there''s a wrong answer. Just be aware buying the riser about the number of 'holes' you'd require BB.

    I think you'll have to make that choice yourself.

    My attitude was I could hardly to wrong with the GM- bought unseen- it's been to the olympics and I'd seen pictures of Christine Gauthe of France using one BB in the 2006 Worls Field Championships.

    That was my first bite of the cherry.

  20. #20
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    What do you think about letting Fita BB equipment in the NFAA Trad division. to get more shooters at the NFAA Outdoor and indoor?
    Quote Originally Posted by barebowguy View Post
    For NFAA traditional you cannot add any external weight except for a quiver

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2413gary View Post
    What do you think about letting Fita BB equipment in the NFAA Trad division. to get more shooters at the NFAA Outdoor and indoor?
    I'd be more interested in letting FITA BB techniques be used. I use my Bernardini Nilo with internal weights for NFAA all the time, no external weights though.

    -Grant

  22. #22
    do you guys think a dalaa in a longer length would make a good barebow and fita bow?
    DAS
    Border Archery

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by blacktail86 View Post
    do you guys think a dalaa in a longer length would make a good barebow and fita bow?
    Probably not, I don't think they come long enough or heavy enough.

  24. #24
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    I think NFAA needs to outlaw the forward mounted quiver.... and I think the reasons are pretty obvious.
    I am not Trad, I just like shooting recurves and longbows.

  25. #25
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    One of the nicest shooting risers that I have is a Hoyt Goldmedalist, with just a bit of weight at the bottom. I think its a Spig wt. (small one). Found it on ebay awhile ago. Not necessary to spend a fortune to get started. Heck you already saved the price of sights and stabs. Gar.
    So many bows, so little time

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