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Thread: Heavy arrows and compound bows?

  1. #1
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    Heavy arrows and compound bows?

    Hello all,

    I am new to compounds and have a question about heavy arrows. I usually shoot longbows and recurves with heavier arrows - around 11-12g per pound. I like the heavier arrows because they really quiet down a bow and reduce vibration. Also I am only shooting around 15-20 yards due to the thicker field/forest environment where I hunt.



    So my question is does the same apply to compounds? Would there be any advantage in terms of reducing noise to shooting a heavy arrow since the range in this case would be limited with a "long" shot being 25 yards? Also, is there a point of diminishing returns with arrow weight where there is no difference in noise reduction but performance starts to really suffer?

    Any feedback would be appreciated.

    thanks,
    Tom.


  2. #2
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    Heavier arrows definately quiet down the bow. People have different views on what a heavy arrow is I like a hunting arrow that is 425 to 500 grains and I only shoot 60lbs. Some think that is really heavy some shoot heavier.
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  3. #3
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    Heavy arrows will quiet the bow down and produce more kinetic energy.


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  4. #4
    Heavier arrows will quiet the bow and produce more KE and momentum than lighter arrows, assuming the bow is tuned properly. There is no point of "diminishing returns" in performance, at least not in any testing that I have done up to 1500 grains of arrow weight. Of course "heavy" depends on your own bow and it's specs, and the distances you will be shooting. You will need to decide for yourself how heavy of an arrow you want to shoot before the trajectory of the arrow becomes an issue at the distances you will be shooting. I'd advise playing around with a few different arrow weights and different distances to see what you think.
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  5. #5
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    IMO heavy is the way to go. Quiets down the bow, same principal.

    the only advantage imo is that a lighter arrow will shoot a little flatter, but since your not shooting over 25 that would be meaningless to me.

    Also there are alot of different opinions on what a 'heavy' arrow is for compounds. i myself prefer an arrow in the 450-500 range. Gives me a good mix of everything.

  6. #6
    I'm with you. My 50lbs longbows shoot my home-made Cedars at 525grs. My 60lbs compound shoots Easton xx75 Hardwood greens 2216s at 520grs. My longbow shot 145 through the chrono my compound shoots 215. I am completely happy with my setup.

  7. #7
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    I agree with the heavy side of arrows. Although what is now considered heavy since caebon arrows still isnt heavy to before that. I hope that makes sense. What I do like to do with carbon arrows and compounds is use the technology to increase FOC and really get a penetrating arrow. KE is over used term in archery. It's best function is to really measure the efficiancy of your bow. If you measure KE from your bow with an assortment of arrows from light to heavy you will see that your KE will not vary much, maybe a pound. Not enough attention to FOC and momentum is paid. These two factor have more to do with penetration than KE alone. All things being equal if you were to build two arrows that weighed exactly the same however you were able to build one with an extreme FOC, like 15%+, and the other had a 10 - 13%, the first arrow would penetrate better. My arrow set up is as follows and it has yet to stop in any animal including a 250lb mid-west whitetail with an exspandable broad head.
    27" Harvest Time HT-2 350, 10 grain GT insert, 20 grain insert weigh adapter, 2 X 30 grain weights, (all from PDP), 125 grain broadhead, 3 X 3" fusion vanes and a 6" wrap with a Easton 3-D nock. Total arrow weight is 478 grain with a 18.5% FOC
    478 is considered heavy however 15 years ago that was prett light and bows were much slower then. Good luck!
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  8. #8
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    I matched a 2008 Bowtech Constitution (shooting fingers) to 300 spine Gamegetter arrows (2317). I found it got quieter and still shot with authority. I've shot since 1983, and my fair share of aluminums through the years. For the past 7-8 years I've shot ACC's pretty exclusively in both recurves and compounds. I bent a 3-71 ACC on an elk I killed in 2010 and have been thinking of using cheaper aluminums since then. I'm javelina hunting next week, and don't feel like destroying an ACC on one of the pigs after it passes thru...hence pulling out the gamegetters to see how they work.

    The Constitution shot that 580 grain arrow at 234 fps which is over 70 fpe. The speed is more than sufficient for me and has plenty of THUMP behind it for game animals. I founda good combination for me.
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  9. #9
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    Same concept would apply to compounds, with maybe some different parameters...... 7.5 - 8.5 grains per pound will get you into a good weight range for a heavier arrow with a compound. I'm shooting a 510 grain aluminum out of my 68 pound Trykon..... 7.5 grains per pound. Much quieter than the carbons I had been trying before.
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  10. #10
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    The heavier arrow will also help slightly with deflection should you glance a piece of brush with an arrow. It does not make them immune to deflection but it will help. A heavy arrow also allows you to shoot a heavier and bigger broadhead to maintain a good foc and then the extra weight helps to push that bigger broadhead through a deer. Pick up some heavy aluminums in a XX78 and I am sure you will be quite happy
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Widgeon View Post
    Heavier arrows will quiet the bow and produce more KE and momentum than lighter arrows, assuming the bow is tuned properly. There is no point of "diminishing returns" in performance, at least not in any testing that I have done up to 1500 grains of arrow weight. Of course "heavy" depends on your own bow and it's specs, and the distances you will be shooting. You will need to decide for yourself how heavy of an arrow you want to shoot before the trajectory of the arrow becomes an issue at the distances you will be shooting. I'd advise playing around with a few different arrow weights and different distances to see what you think.
    This is 100% the correct answer
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  12. #12
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    shoot a 380+ grn arrow and a 500+ grn arrow at a block or hanging bag target and see what arrow rocks the targets more....

  13. #13
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    I like heavy arrows, but for 11 months out of the year I shoot out past 80 yards so I also like a little better trajectory. So I pretty much stick with my 500gr TR Crush 300's at 285fps.

    If I feel like going heavy I have some GT Kinetic 200's with 75gr brass HIT's with 180gr Silverflame XL's up front, for total weight of 632gr.
    2006 LH Bowtech Old Glory 70#, 32 1/2" draw, back to the Hostage rest, SH 7-pin Hunter, 500gr TR Crush 300 @ 285fps.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Widgeon View Post
    Heavier arrows will quiet the bow and produce more KE and momentum than lighter arrows, assuming the bow is tuned properly. There is no point of "diminishing returns" in performance, at least not in any testing that I have done up to 1500 grains of arrow weight. Of course "heavy" depends on your own bow and it's specs, and the distances you will be shooting. You will need to decide for yourself how heavy of an arrow you want to shoot before the trajectory of the arrow becomes an issue at the distances you will be shooting. I'd advise playing around with a few different arrow weights and different distances to see what you think.


    If you ever plan going out west you'll probably want to shoot a lighter (400-450 range) arrow to get the flatter trajectory!
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  15. #15
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    Sad, but true --- I'm old enough that 500 grains doesn't sound heavy.

    Best of luck to you.

  16. #16
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    Once an arrow is shot, it doesn't matter if the bow was a recurve, compound or crossbow. If the arrow speed is the same it will perform the same. The difference is that compounds typically give a little more speed which results in more KE and momentum.

    Since you mentioned grains per pound of DW, you are probably familiar with Dr Ashby's research. I wish he had done more work with lighter game like whitetail. While the principles are the same, the threshold of arrow weight for bone penetration is likely lower. Unfortunately, we don't have research that establishes that number.

    The heavier the arrow, the quieter it will be (up to a point) and the better it will maintain trajectory when it hits small branches or leaves.

    Allen

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