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Thread: bareshafting question

  1. #1
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    bareshafting question

    The conventional bareshaft method is to shoot a few bareshafts along with some fletched shafts and tune until the two group together. Why not just shoot bareshafts and tune until they group where you are aiming?



  2. #2
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    I've done it, works just fine. Doesn't work unless you shoot with a definite aiming method though, not so much for the instinctive guys.
    Plus you may find the arrows don't go where your aiming once the fletching goes on.

    -Grant

  3. #3
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    Arcus -

    A fletched arrow goes where you want it to go, a bare shaft goes where it wants to go. Even stiff or weak bare shafts will always group as long as you are consistent. The flight may be lousy and the arrows may hit the target sideways, but they will group. There is some validity to tuning bare shafts so that they enter the target perpendicular in both the vertical an horizontal axises, but combining bare shafts with fletched arrows seems to work better for people who aren't shooting machines.

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Arcus View Post
    Why not just shoot bareshafts and tune until they group where you are aiming?
    Because...in most cases...an archer isn't specifically tuning to have their arrows group where they are aiming. They are tuning to optimize arrow flight so the arrow either gets better penetration on an animal and/or is more forgiving of shooter error. In some cases...an archer will tune for good arrow flight because it annoys the crap out of them to see an arrow wave goodbye to them after it's been released.

    Good arrow flight isn't necessarily neded for accuracy. A poorly tuned arrow will shot exactly the same if the archer shoots exactly the same.

    Ray

  5. #5
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    Is it normal to have the bareshaft fishtail worse when shooting off the shelf versus an elevated flipper rest? I bought some new shafts for my takedown ILF recurve and got to bareshaft tuning. Tuned them in decently for the flipper rest and then shot again off the shelf - arrows were flopping left and right but still grouping reasonably but definitely not perpendicular to the target face. Is it worth getting a compromise between the two or just stick with the flipper rest? If it helps:

    - Sky 15" TDX ILF riser
    - W&W medium 40# limbs (50# at the fingers at 28.5" draw)
    - Gold Tip 3555 shafts at 29" length
    - 100 gr. screw-in tips
    - 3" shield cut Gateway feathers


    Thanks.

  6. #6
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    J -

    If both scenarios are tuned correctly no - arrow should fly correctly from either. The odds are that when you switched from the rest to the shelf, you messed up the tuning, hence the change in flight characteristics.

    Basically ANY change you make to equipment OR technique may require some degree of retuning. As far as shooting both ways, you might be able to find a compromise tune, but it won't be perfect for either case. I'd pick one and stick with it.

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcus View Post
    The conventional bareshaft method is to shoot a few bareshafts along with some fletched shafts and tune until the two group together. Why not just shoot bareshafts and tune until they group where you are aiming?
    Because that would be "sighting"...not.."tuning" .

    it seems there's a lot of confusion regarding bareshaft tuning and i'll try to clear some of this up for you (as this is an area i know a lil sumpt'in about) because there's also another issue i see getting twisted a lot as follows...

    and that other issue is "Spine VS Rest"...and what your looking for "spine wise" is that both the fletched and the bareshaft "TIPS" strike the same POI..now...if you can get that?..you're good or at least in the ballpark spinewise..the next issue is a seperate one that being..

    Even though the tips are striking the same poi?..you may notice that your bareshaft nocks are skewed either left/right or up/down or a combination of the two..and on the left right thing?..this is where many folks get confused and made a bad call of "MIS-SPINED ARROWS"...this is NOT true...as if the point ends of both fletched and bare are grouping together?..the only thing needed here is "Rest Tuning"..and once you get the rest tuned for left/right-up/down?..your bareshafts should be flying true provided a clean release is executed and now?..if your bareshafts are grouping left or right of your fletched?..now "THAT" is..a spine issue.

    That said?..the above only applies to trad bows that have enough center-shot to execute such fine tune adjustments and you may/will find that "shaft diameter" plays a critical role here...and when it comes to longbows that are cut 1/16th-1/8th past center?..all bets are off and i myself am still wrestling with that one as it seems that "archers paradox" will become my only friend here..if?...i'm able to find it at all..and if i do?..it'll be trial and error experimentation and shear luck as i'm recently coming to find that with longbows?..your tuning options are seriously limited cause i'm almost to the point that i'm beginning to believe that bareshaft tuning longbows is an exercise in futility. (like that one thorwulfx? LOL!)

    Hope that helps and L8R, Bill.
    "A person voicing their opinion on the net is often times an admission of character."
    BLACK WIDOW PSA II TD RECURVE 62"/43# @28"
    1975 HERTERS PERFECTION MAGNUM RECURVE 60"/44# @ 28"
    BUSHMEN "AMERICAN NATIVE" R/D LONGBOW 64"/37# @ 28"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Viper1 View Post
    J -

    If both scenarios are tuned correctly no - arrow should fly correctly from either. The odds are that when you switched from the rest to the shelf, you messed up the tuning, hence the change in flight characteristics.

    Basically ANY change you make to equipment OR technique may require some degree of retuning. As far as shooting both ways, you might be able to find a compromise tune, but it won't be perfect for either case. I'd pick one and stick with it.

    Viper1 out.

    Nuts. Not sure what I did then. I have a hair rug rest with a felt furniture pad stuck to the shelf. The riser has an elevated Berger hole above that in which I placed a NAP flipper rest. Both have been adjusted so the arrows are pretty equal in terms of centershot (as viewed from behind the bow with the string lined up in the middle of the limbs and riser). I shot the arrows off the flipper first, then pulled it for feather clearance, and then shot again off the hair rest. I did not unstring the bow or alter it in any other manner. My only guess would be there is some difference between how the arrow launches off the plastic flipper rest pad and the furniture pad on the shelf. I didn't use the original black plastic plate that came with the hair rest since it put the arrow too far to the right of centershot. Perhaps they included that plate for this very reason? Only one way to find out I suppose... My goal was to use the flipper as my primary rest, but be able to switch to the hair rest so a broken flipper wouldn't ruin a hunt.

  9. #9
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    J-San -

    Just because the arrows appeared to have the same offset, doesn't meant that they really do or will affect the arrow the same way. Apparently minor differences can have major effects.

    Buddy, if you can break a NAP flipper rest, my hats off to you. Just try pushing the arm all the way back. Then push it back into to the correct position - it's designed to do that. If you are that worried about it, carry a spare head in your pack. You can swap one out in seconds. Honestly, there's a greater chance of the furniture pad falling off. Try getting a new pad to stay on in the field.

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

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