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Thread: Lime, Seed, Fertilize?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Clarksville, TN
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    Lime, Seed, Fertilize?

    I am just about to plant my spring plot and I was curious to what order I should go to plant. The ground has already beeen disc'd.
    Lime first, then seed, then fertilize?
    or Lime, fertilize, and then seed?



    Any opinions or advice is appreciated.
    "Nothing like a good piece of hickory."


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    Cambridge, Ohio
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    The lime and fertilizer should be disked in, if at all possible. If not, the lime can be put on at any time. It won’t help now, but will eventually. The fertilizer, assuming it contains N, should either be disked in or spread right before a good rain. A lot of the N will evaporate fairly quickly if it isn’t. Lime, fertilizer, and seed can all be done the same day if you’d like.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Madison AL
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    57
    Lime it now and disc it in. Let it sit for a couple of weeks to works itself in. Spread your fertilizer next and disc it in, come back with the seed over the top and either drag it in, or cultipack it into the soil.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Virginia
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    Personal preference. Do whatever works best for you. Pressed for time? Do it all in one day. Got equipment and time, disk in the lime and fertilizer. The elements in lime work s-l-o-w-l-y into the soil, maybe and inch and a half or two a year. If your soils's really acid, you can use mechanics to get it deeper, but you probably should double the amount of lime you apply! Same would be true of phosphorus, less so with potassium. Nitrogen left on the soil surface will turn to gas, but the kinds we use aren't all that prone to it.

    Either way, will you notice a difference? I doubt it....

    Out here on the farm we generally just dump it all on the surface. Time and expense of incorporation out weigh the benefits of working it into the soil.

    By all and any means, though, get your seedpressed firmly INTO the soil.

  5. #5
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    Here is a pic of my 'kill plot' it is back in the woods a bit, it is too small to disc with an ATV so I had to rake it, I built the feeder last year.uploadfromtaptalk1335099911467.jpguploadfromtaptalk1335099940570.jpg

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    "Nothing like a good piece of hickory."

  6. #6
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    Here is what it looks like now, growing good ands all of this done with a rake and a good rain


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    "Nothing like a good piece of hickory."

  7. #7
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    I also raked, fertilized, planted seed and watered this area. Its about 6'x 100'. I hope its grows as well as my other " no tools farming project"


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    "Nothing like a good piece of hickory."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
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    Any suggestions regarding application of fertilizer in all this heat? Wait ? Or go ahead and fertilize?
    Original Mathews Z7, 29in 70lbs, QAD Ultrarest, Viper Diamondback Pro 2000, Axion 5" GLZ, Scott Sabertooth Release, T5 Quiver
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  9. #9
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    I put out the fertilizer and lime in April, I think that if you put it out in June/July with the temps in the 90's, you might scorch your seed.
    I would wait unitl late august/early sept. to fertilitize/lime. You could also put it out after a good rain and you might be alright.
    I am no expert, the above pics were of the first food plots I have ever planted, I was constrained by time and convienience.
    "Nothing like a good piece of hickory."

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
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    Cambridge, Ohio
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    Heat doesn't make any difference. It won't scorch seed, in fact it won't effect seed at all. It can burn plants. If nitrogen is left on plants, particularly if there's a light drizzle or heavy dew soon after, that's what burns plant. Ideally, fertilizer should be spread shortly before a good steady rain. If it' hot and dry in your area, it's probably not a great time to fertilize. Wait for some rains to get plants growing good again, and to work the fertilizer into the soil.

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