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Thread: This one's for all the Instinctive Shooters

  1. #26
    Like you, I am new at instinctive shooting and traditional archery. I can absolutely say that I am far, far more accurate with my compound bow, specially if I start to pile any distance on.

    I find that instinctive archery is challenging, one end I will put one in the bullseye and be thrilled because all I did was focus intently on it. My next arrow though i could be a foot away from an X or much more. The inconsistency makes it frustrating, aside from hitting bullseye's a lot of the satisfaction for me comes from using my dad's 50 year old Hoyt, being a part of traditional archery, doing it with my kids, going stump shooting, just simpler, less gear and stuff, also from a practical sense cheaper, so man, wishing you lots of fun out there with it, sounds like you are on a good path.
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  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by c-lo View Post
    Like you, I am new at instinctive shooting and traditional archery. I can absolutely say that I am far, far more accurate with my compound bow, specially if I start to pile any distance on.

    I find that instinctive archery is challenging, one end I will put one in the bullseye and be thrilled because all I did was focus intently on it. My next arrow though i could be a foot away from an X or much more. The inconsistency makes it frustrating, aside from hitting bullseye's a lot of the satisfaction for me comes from using my dad's 50 year old Hoyt, being a part of traditional archery, doing it with my kids, going stump shooting, just simpler, less gear and stuff, also from a practical sense cheaper, so man, wishing you lots of fun out there with it, sounds like you are on a good path.
    Same for me. I love the challenge barebow brings, but I also really like my compounds. I enjoy both for different reasons.

  3. #28
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    I'm at the point now where I really feel it in my bones that I won't shoot a compound anymore. If I get where I can't shoot a recurve bow then I'll hang it up and do nothing but my art and make knives.....
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  4. #29
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    Great video Black Wolf. Incredible shooting, really cool to watch...

  5. #30
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    After watching the video Ray posted on here it reminded me of the Romans and their hired archers. They considered the archer a barbarian and they stuck with the foot soldier with sword and shield. They encountered the Parthians and these supposedly barbarians rode their horse backwards and fired their bows back at the advancing Roman soldiers. This cowardly act, which proved to be very effective convinced the Romans to hire their own archers. That they did and it was a long time before they accepted the fact that the archer was a major force to contend with in the act of war........Having said that, the Roman foot soldier was something NOT to take lightly. The phalanx was a veery effective means of warfare!
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  6. #31
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    It is amazing how archery played such a big part in military history. Always interesting to read about the different style of bows each army used, Romans, Turks, Assyrians, Asians, Native Americans...though the Native Americans did adopt the use of firearms very early on.
    I do think they all would have loved to had the opportunity to use a glass laminated bow though... since they were for whatever improvements that would give them an edge.
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  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curve1 View Post
    It is amazing how archery played such a big part in military history. Always interesting to read about the different style of bows each army used, Romans, Turks, Assyrians, Asians, Native Americans...though the Native Americans did adopt the use of firearms very early on.
    I do think they all would have loved to had the opportunity to use a glass laminated bow though... since they were for whatever improvements that would give them an edge.
    You know the saying....If Geronimo had a modern recurve we would be speaking Apache! these new bows are soooooo good and the whole thing about the early shooters like the Romans, Asians and the Nomadic tribes was the archer behind the bow. They got to be experts with whatever they had. the Indians loved the Osage Orange or what we down in Texas called the HORSE APPLE trees. Their bows were rather crude by our standards but they conquered them and were good with them.
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  8. #33
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    Yes, I think you hit the nail on the head. It's the archer that puts the arrow where he wants it to go. That's assuming there's nothin wrong with the bow of course.

    I contend that for a nation to try to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.

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  9. #34
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    If I was better with my recurve them my compound I'd be one horrid shot with a compound. Lol

  10. #35
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    OFF TOPIC - In the video above, the tuning of the bow seems to be nock low at :56 sec. Fun to see a tuning problem in slow motion.
    Last edited by oxnam; April 9th, 2012 at 04:06 PM.
    Introduction to Aerial Archery - DVD - Start shooting flying targets and birds with your bow!

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by oxnam View Post
    OFF TOPIC - In the video above, the tuning of the bow seems to be nock low at :56 sec. Fun to see a tuning problem in slow motion.
    He's shooting off his hand and with no nock locator on his string - hand placement and nock placement are both variable. His tune with regard to nock location is probably more feel than anything else.

  12. #37
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    It is like throwing a ball but what I think what happens (just my oppinion) is the eyes see the arc of the arrow they transmit the picture to your subcon. brain that little computer between my ears and I mean little never forgets what that picture looks like. just like throwing a ball my subconsious brain tells my body how hard and high to throw the ball to hit the spot. same as how high or low to aim to shoot an arrow. Remember this how I shoot instinctive. when I switch back and forth between recurve and compound I have to shoot a few arrows to get the picture and then right on target.
    Gary
    Quote Originally Posted by WindWalker View Post
    It is just like throwing a ball....if the target or the deer field's the catch.

  13. #38
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    Curious - when did the definition of instinctive change?
    For a long time it simply meant shooting without sights on the bow - still does to a lot of the archery community worldwide.

  14. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveB View Post
    Curious - when did the definition of instinctive change?
    For a long time it simply meant shooting without sights on the bow - still does to a lot of the archery community worldwide.
    Probably when there was a realization that there needed to be a distinction between the other barebow aiming techniques and an archer actually aiming Instinctively as the word applies to a specific aiming technique now.

    Ray

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveB View Post
    Curious - when did the definition of instinctive change?
    For a long time it simply meant shooting without sights on the bow - still does to a lot of the archery community worldwide.
    Thats the way I've always looked at it but I come from the old school! Thats how it was back in the old days, if you didn't use a sight, you had to shoot instinctively, no other way even if you used gaps or spots it was instinctive shooting. Its all different now.......
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  16. #41
    I call it barebow without sights and and such. Keeps it simple. Now, if they specifically ask what aiming technique ill say split-vision, gap-stinctive(thanks black wolf). Im from the school that no matter how hard you try there is no "true" instinctive shooting, but that is just me personally. Call it what you will and lets have a fun shoot.

  17. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by BLACK WOLF View Post
    Probably when there was a realization that there needed to be a distinction between the other barebow aiming techniques and an archer actually aiming Instinctively as the word applies to a specific aiming technique now.

    Ray
    Why not come up with a new term rather then try to redefine one that had been, and continues to be, used in a different context?

  18. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveB View Post
    Why not come up with a new term rather then try to redefine one that had been, and continues to be, used in a different context?
    I don't know why...but a similar question can than be asked. Why not come to terms that the word Instinctive has been being used for quite a while now to describe a specific aiming technique and there are books and videos out already teaching it?

    I really don't see the need to come up with a new term to describe Instinctive Aiming...when there already is a term/word that describes shooting a bow without sights. It's called Barebow.

    Ray

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by BLACK WOLF View Post
    I don't know why...but a similar question can than be asked. Why not come to terms that the word Instinctive has been being used for quite a while now to describe a specific aiming technique and there are books and videos out already teaching it?

    I really don't see the need to come up with a new term to describe Instinctive Aiming...when there already is a term/word that describes shooting a bow without sights. It's called Barebow.

    Ray
    More than likely what has happened, over the years, these different classes at tournaments caused some debate over what is and what isn't and they had to come up with new names for them. Back in the 50s and 60s there just wasn't that many classes, maybe two......with or without a sight and that was it. Now we have all these tech terms to sort out and classify so that the debates and arguments are put aside.....My lands, look what we go thru here, just on the attributes of instinctive shooting......
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  20. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by rembrandt View Post
    More than likely what has happened, over the years, these different classes at tournaments caused some debate over what is and what isn't and they had to come up with new names for them. Back in the 50s and 60s there just wasn't that many classes, maybe two......with or without a sight and that was it.
    I think you nailed it. That helps explain a big reason why the term has changed over the years.

    It's human nature to want to win and being able to understand techniques that may have advantages or disadvantages can be an asset.

    Whatever reason it was...Instinctive Aiming does deserve it's own name/term as do the other barebow aiming techniques. If for no other reason...it should be used only for educational purposes to try and teach or explain how to use it and what it's general advantages and disadvantages are under specific shooting circumstances.

    Ray

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by BLACK WOLF View Post
    I think you nailed it. That helps explain a big reason why the term has changed over the years.

    It's human nature to want to win and being able to understand techniques that may have advantages or disadvantages can be an asset.

    Whatever reason it was...Instinctive Aiming does deserve it's own name/term as do the other barebow aiming techniques. If for no other reason...it should be used only for educational purposes to try and teach or explain how to use it and what it's general advantages and disadvantages are under specific shooting circumstances.

    Ray
    I think you nailed it too. I can't add anything to that! Well said! Its kinda hard to type with a Chihuahua in my lap who wants to be loved all the time. Her name is Tikky. She is a Cobby Chihuahua and her legs are about 3 inches long. I love the little people! We have 4 of them.!
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  22. #47
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    one of the reasons i started shooting stickbow was because i would get target panic with the compound and figured i would try to simplify things , it has helped and i dont have target panic with stickbows but the amount of focus is as much or greater then with the wheel bow.
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  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by airwolf View Post
    one of the reasons i started shooting stickbow was because i would get target panic with the compound and figured i would try to simplify things , it has helped and i dont have target panic with stickbows but the amount of focus is as much or greater then with the wheel bow.
    I think its even more so. If you let your concentration go to a part of your form or any distraction, your score will suffer. I think more so than with a compound cause you have other things working for you like a peep and a sight that gives you the exact distance you need, that is if you know the distance or its posted....
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