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Thread: Why I love my Mathews Heli-m! To help others wade through the Mathews bashers.

  1. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by ChappyHOYT View Post
    Negative comment=bash in my book. Don't bash me calling a comment a bash.
    Then perhaps you should have qualified your thread title by including "nothing but positive comments accepted".



  2. #27
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    I would like to try it out. Still dont like the looks but hey if it shoots good thats all the really matters.
    Hunt/target: Bowtech Insanity, MBG accent w/ vengeance head and dovetail, limb driver, Paradigm carbon hammer and QD, Black eagle
    trad: Hunterbows 3 piece hybrid longbow, bear kodiak
    paradigm archery field staff

  3. #28
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    Don't listen to the haters! Most of them haven't even shot one. I owned a Tactical and regret selling it. Smooth as butter and shoots lights out. Unfortunately my Carbon Element and Insanity are just as nice and just couldn't afford to keep all three. Hopefully I can pick up another in the near future.
    Hoyt Carbon Spyder 30 Xtra 65/28
    Axcel Armortech HD Vision Pro
    Hoyt QAD HDX
    6.5 Fuse Carbon Blade
    Easton daTorch 330 w/Muzzy Trocar heads

  4. #29
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    These threads are always funny. It's like someone feels the need to justify their decision and convince everyone else it's the best decision anyone could possibly make. I've done it as well and I'm sure I'll do it again. Anyway, at the risk of busting up the "love fest" (and being called a basher) I'll just offer some comments.

    First off, I'm happy you are so thrilled with this bow. That's a great place to be and having a high degree of confidence in your bow is really important and should pay dividends both on the range and in the field.

    I used to shoot Mathews but it's been a number of years since I moved away from them and frankly it's because I just haven't been impressed with their offerings as compared to some of the other options out there. Like many, I'm not any more impressed with the HeliM than their other recent offerings however I have to let you know that I haven't shot the HeliM (although I've handled it) so I have no basis upon which to form a specific and supportable position on this bow. I say all of this in full disclosure before making the following comments on your areas of focus (which some here believe to be the basis of a "great review" - which is sort of laughable - it's subjective opinions only, as are the ones I'm about to share).

    1. SMMMOOOOOTTTHHHH. I suspect most wouldn't argue that the bow is smooth. Even Mathews haters can't argue with the fact that Mathews has long had the "smooth" draw thing figured out. That said, I'm shocked how much variability in opinion you get in this area. My conclusion, however, is that your body adjusts to whatever draw cycle your bow has and when you switch to another you often don't find it as smooth (at least initially). As an example, I used to shoot a Hoyt AM32 as my primary hunting bow. Last year I switched to the Bowtech Invasion. I recently dusted off the AM32 with the intent of using for turkey season (it's a black riser and I want to used diff arrows). I HATED the draw cycle and valley compared to the Invasion (even though it used to be just fine for me) but after shooting it for a while I've re-conditioned my body to the AM32 for the purposes of turkey hunting.
    2. Accurate. Technically, no bow is more "accurate" than another. We could get any modern bow shooting just as accurate as your HeliM out of a machine. Accuracy comes primarily from tune and personal fit and while you might be able to shoot the HeliM very accurately compared to certain other bows, many other folks would be just the opposite. At the end of the day, I hope it does fit you really well and that you are able to tune it well.
    3. Quiet. So you are saying that Mathews has gone backwards in this area given that you don't perceive it to be as quiet as previous models? Interesting. I assume you didn't test with a decibal meter though. Frankly, there are very few modern bows that aren't plenty quiet enough to serve the purpose (and they are WAY better than models I shot 10 and 20 years ago - but we somehow managed to kill plenty of deer with those bows). If you want a truly quiet bow, start shooting a longbow.
    4. No vibe or feedback. Your comment is said all the time but there simply is no such thing as a bow with no vibe or feedback. It's physically impossible. Likely what you meant to say is that you find the vibe and feeback to be so minimal that it's not terribly noticeable. Again, not surprising with a modern parallel limb bow. Very few have much vibration that would or should be bothersome. As for feedback, many actually would find it a negative that they get no perceptable "feedback". Most target archers will tell you how important "feedback" actually is to their ability to consistently shoot accurately and make improvements over time.
    5. Easy to tune, Not sure what you mean by this as I have no idea what your ability to truly tune a bow is (your comments regarding binaries might cause one to question this). My opinion is that 99% of the guys/gals out there that own bows don't really know how to tune a bow and they are shooting improperly tuned bows as a result. My personal opinion is that the solo cam is an inferior cam system (but I won't get into that here). What I will say is that I do agree that a single cam is easier for the average person to get an acceptable tune out of. But I think they can actually be harder to micro-tune than a hybrid or the overdrive binary - both of which I've had plenty of tuning experience with as well. I will say these other cam systems are more involved and probably more challenging for the average guy to tune. It's probably one reason the solo cam will continue to be a popular option for much of the mass market that isn't obsessed with tuning like I am.
    6. Holds awesome. This is hugely personal. I used to shoot top heavy models like the early Bowtechs and the Mathews bows and while I shot them accurately, I hated the feel of them. Give me a more balanced bow (prefer it to rock back a bit with nothing on it) so that I can get some weight (B-Stinger) out front to optimize hold vs. a bow that's aleady top heavy and wants to nosedive once you get sight and good stab on it. That said, when I held the HeliM I actually thought it was better balanced than many of the Mathews models they've put out in recent years (still not to my liking though).
    7. The grip. Again, very personal. Mathews grips have sucked for years. They have moved in the right direction but many still don't like the latest version - I don't think they've solved the problem yet. I think grip is hugely important but I rarely let it decide a bow purchase because you can almost always fix it with aftermarket grips or variations of manufacturer options. When I shot Mathews I pulled the grips and used aftermarket options. With my Hoyt's I shoot one side plate only (so off the riser with just the thumb side plate). The Invasion grip is perfect as it comes.
    8. The weight. And again, everyone has a different opinion here. I think there is such this as too light and too heavy for each person. You have to find what weight fits you best but I will say that going too light will hurt stability and forget about trying to shoot in the wind. I do generally agree that a little lighter on the base bow is better so that you can add weight where you want to in order to optimize balance. Is the HeliM too light? Probably for some but it all comes down to setup and personal taste.

    In the end, my point is only to reinforce that a bow is a very personal thing and you need to find what fits you best. People shouldn't be making a decision about what is or isn't a good bow based either on your opinions ("review") or based on the comments of Mathews bashers. Go figure it out yourself.

    Happy shooting and I hope you have much success with your HeliM (although Mathews might not be happy to hear that you like it sooooo much that you'll shoot it for many years - I'm sure they'd prefer to sell you a new one next year! )
    "Every man dies, not every man really lives."
    PSE * Xpedition * CBE/Spot Hogg * Stan Shootoff * Hamskea Versa Rest * B-Stinger * Swarovski Binoculars * Double Bull Archery Blinds * Stormy Hardwoods * John's Custom Archery (aka "Breathn")

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by BUSHfire View Post
    I love Elites and still do, anyways I couldnt wait to try a Answer I had to drive hours just to get my hands on one. So I get there and shot it like 10 times and was like eehhh yeah its nice but not what I was expecting after all the Hype!!! My friend on the other hand wanted to shot a Helium, and I was like na I owned 2 z7's and its just a stripped down lighted one. But since he had it out and I was there I flung a few out of it, and I was like WOW! then I shot it back to back Vs. the Answer, after that I had no interest in the answer was so ever. I dont own one yet but I think its at the top of my list. Set it up my way and shoot one for a while and see what I think. I wasnt a fan of the focus grips on my other Z7's (every one is different) but I hear the updated draw stop works wonders!
    Exactly, I shot both the Helim and Answer and loved them both. But for me then Answer came out on top. I really liked that bow.

  6. #31
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    Central IL
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    501
    Quote Originally Posted by Predator View Post
    These threads are always funny. It's like someone feels the need to justify their decision and convince everyone else it's the best decision anyone could possibly make. I've done it as well and I'm sure I'll do it again. Anyway, at the risk of busting up the "love fest" (and being called a basher) I'll just offer some comments.

    First off, I'm happy you are so thrilled with this bow. That's a great place to be and having a high degree of confidence in your bow is really important and should pay dividends both on the range and in the field.

    I used to shoot Mathews but it's been a number of years since I moved away from them and frankly it's because I just haven't been impressed with their offerings as compared to some of the other options out there. Like many, I'm not any more impressed with the HeliM than their other recent offerings however I have to let you know that I haven't shot the HeliM (although I've handled it) so I have no basis upon which to form a specific and supportable position on this bow. I say all of this in full disclosure before making the following comments on your areas of focus (which some here believe to be the basis of a "great review" - which is sort of laughable - it's subjective opinions only, as are the ones I'm about to share).

    1. SMMMOOOOOTTTHHHH. I suspect most wouldn't argue that the bow is smooth. Even Mathews haters can't argue with the fact that Mathews has long had the "smooth" draw thing figured out. That said, I'm shocked how much variability in opinion you get in this area. My conclusion, however, is that your body adjusts to whatever draw cycle your bow has and when you switch to another you often don't find it as smooth (at least initially). As an example, I used to shoot a Hoyt AM32 as my primary hunting bow. Last year I switched to the Bowtech Invasion. I recently dusted off the AM32 with the intent of using for turkey season (it's a black riser and I want to used diff arrows). I HATED the draw cycle and valley compared to the Invasion (even though it used to be just fine for me) but after shooting it for a while I've re-conditioned my body to the AM32 for the purposes of turkey hunting.
    2. Accurate. Technically, no bow is more "accurate" than another. We could get any modern bow shooting just as accurate as your HeliM out of a machine. Accuracy comes primarily from tune and personal fit and while you might be able to shoot the HeliM very accurately compared to certain other bows, many other folks would be just the opposite. At the end of the day, I hope it does fit you really well and that you are able to tune it well.
    3. Quiet. So you are saying that Mathews has gone backwards in this area given that you don't perceive it to be as quiet as previous models? Interesting. I assume you didn't test with a decibal meter though. Frankly, there are very few modern bows that aren't plenty quiet enough to serve the purpose (and they are WAY better than models I shot 10 and 20 years ago - but we somehow managed to kill plenty of deer with those bows). If you want a truly quiet bow, start shooting a longbow.
    4. No vibe or feedback. Your comment is said all the time but there simply is no such thing as a bow with no vibe or feedback. It's physically impossible. Likely what you meant to say is that you find the vibe and feeback to be so minimal that it's not terribly noticeable. Again, not surprising with a modern parallel limb bow. Very few have much vibration that would or should be bothersome. As for feedback, many actually would find it a negative that they get no perceptable "feedback". Most target archers will tell you how important "feedback" actually is to their ability to consistently shoot accurately and make improvements over time.
    5. Easy to tune, Not sure what you mean by this as I have no idea what your ability to truly tune a bow is (your comments regarding binaries might cause one to question this). My opinion is that 99% of the guys/gals out there that own bows don't really know how to tune a bow and they are shooting improperly tuned bows as a result. My personal opinion is that the solo cam is an inferior cam system (but I won't get into that here). What I will say is that I do agree that a single cam is easier for the average person to get an acceptable tune out of. But I think they can actually be harder to micro-tune than a hybrid or the overdrive binary - both of which I've had plenty of tuning experience with as well. I will say these other cam systems are more involved and probably more challenging for the average guy to tune. It's probably one reason the solo cam will continue to be a popular option for much of the mass market that isn't obsessed with tuning like I am.
    6. Holds awesome. This is hugely personal. I used to shoot top heavy models like the early Bowtechs and the Mathews bows and while I shot them accurately, I hated the feel of them. Give me a more balanced bow (prefer it to rock back a bit with nothing on it) so that I can get some weight (B-Stinger) out front to optimize hold vs. a bow that's aleady top heavy and wants to nosedive once you get sight and good stab on it. That said, when I held the HeliM I actually thought it was better balanced than many of the Mathews models they've put out in recent years (still not to my liking though).
    7. The grip. Again, very personal. Mathews grips have sucked for years. They have moved in the right direction but many still don't like the latest version - I don't think they've solved the problem yet. I think grip is hugely important but I rarely let it decide a bow purchase because you can almost always fix it with aftermarket grips or variations of manufacturer options. When I shot Mathews I pulled the grips and used aftermarket options. With my Hoyt's I shoot one side plate only (so off the riser with just the thumb side plate). The Invasion grip is perfect as it comes.
    8. The weight. And again, everyone has a different opinion here. I think there is such this as too light and too heavy for each person. You have to find what weight fits you best but I will say that going too light will hurt stability and forget about trying to shoot in the wind. I do generally agree that a little lighter on the base bow is better so that you can add weight where you want to in order to optimize balance. Is the HeliM too light? Probably for some but it all comes down to setup and personal taste.

    In the end, my point is only to reinforce that a bow is a very personal thing and you need to find what fits you best. People shouldn't be making a decision about what is or isn't a good bow based either on your opinions ("review") or based on the comments of Mathews bashers. Go figure it out yourself.

    Happy shooting and I hope you have much success with your HeliM (although Mathews might not be happy to hear that you like it sooooo much that you'll shoot it for many years - I'm sure they'd prefer to sell you a new one next year! )

    Wow. A lot to say for someone not bashing????

  7. #32
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    Nov 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Predator View Post
    In the end, my point is only to reinforce that a bow is a very personal thing and you need to find what fits you best. People shouldn't be making a decision about what is or isn't a good bow based either on your opinions ("review") or based on the comments of Mathews bashers. Go figure it out yourself.


    Oh i did make my own decision & decided it was a good bow for ME, so yes i figured it out for myself lol.






    Quote Originally Posted by Predator View Post
    Happy shooting and I hope you have much success with your HeliM (although Mathews might not be happy to hear that you like it sooooo much that you'll shoot it for many years - I'm sure they'd prefer to sell you a new one next year! )


    But I'll probably get another Heli-M or try a 2013 Mathews whatever. Happy Shooting!

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by frankchugga View Post
    Then perhaps you should have qualified your thread title by including "nothing but positive comments accepted".
    Or maybe just no comments from Franky McPherson, Matt's love child.

    I hope that someday we will be able to put away our fears and prejudices and just laugh at people.

    2013 Elite Answer Max-1 "Max", 29" 60lbs GT Velocity Pros, Limb Driver, Spot Hogg Real Deal Sight, Rocket Hammer Heads(turks), Slicks(Deer)

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Predator View Post
    These threads are always funny. It's like someone feels the need to justify their decision and convince everyone else it's the best decision anyone could possibly make. I've done it as well and I'm sure I'll do it again. Anyway, at the risk of busting up the "love fest" (and being called a basher) I'll just offer some comments.

    First off, I'm happy you are so thrilled with this bow. That's a great place to be and having a high degree of confidence in your bow is really important and should pay dividends both on the range and in the field.

    I used to shoot Mathews but it's been a number of years since I moved away from them and frankly it's because I just haven't been impressed with their offerings as compared to some of the other options out there. Like many, I'm not any more impressed with the HeliM than their other recent offerings however I have to let you know that I haven't shot the HeliM (although I've handled it) so I have no basis upon which to form a specific and supportable position on this bow. I say all of this in full disclosure before making the following comments on your areas of focus (which some here believe to be the basis of a "great review" - which is sort of laughable - it's subjective opinions only, as are the ones I'm about to share).

    1. SMMMOOOOOTTTHHHH. I suspect most wouldn't argue that the bow is smooth. Even Mathews haters can't argue with the fact that Mathews has long had the "smooth" draw thing figured out. That said, I'm shocked how much variability in opinion you get in this area. My conclusion, however, is that your body adjusts to whatever draw cycle your bow has and when you switch to another you often don't find it as smooth (at least initially). As an example, I used to shoot a Hoyt AM32 as my primary hunting bow. Last year I switched to the Bowtech Invasion. I recently dusted off the AM32 with the intent of using for turkey season (it's a black riser and I want to used diff arrows). I HATED the draw cycle and valley compared to the Invasion (even though it used to be just fine for me) but after shooting it for a while I've re-conditioned my body to the AM32 for the purposes of turkey hunting.
    2. Accurate. Technically, no bow is more "accurate" than another. We could get any modern bow shooting just as accurate as your HeliM out of a machine. Accuracy comes primarily from tune and personal fit and while you might be able to shoot the HeliM very accurately compared to certain other bows, many other folks would be just the opposite. At the end of the day, I hope it does fit you really well and that you are able to tune it well.
    3. Quiet. So you are saying that Mathews has gone backwards in this area given that you don't perceive it to be as quiet as previous models? Interesting. I assume you didn't test with a decibal meter though. Frankly, there are very few modern bows that aren't plenty quiet enough to serve the purpose (and they are WAY better than models I shot 10 and 20 years ago - but we somehow managed to kill plenty of deer with those bows). If you want a truly quiet bow, start shooting a longbow.
    4. No vibe or feedback. Your comment is said all the time but there simply is no such thing as a bow with no vibe or feedback. It's physically impossible. Likely what you meant to say is that you find the vibe and feeback to be so minimal that it's not terribly noticeable. Again, not surprising with a modern parallel limb bow. Very few have much vibration that would or should be bothersome. As for feedback, many actually would find it a negative that they get no perceptable "feedback". Most target archers will tell you how important "feedback" actually is to their ability to consistently shoot accurately and make improvements over time.
    5. Easy to tune, Not sure what you mean by this as I have no idea what your ability to truly tune a bow is (your comments regarding binaries might cause one to question this). My opinion is that 99% of the guys/gals out there that own bows don't really know how to tune a bow and they are shooting improperly tuned bows as a result. My personal opinion is that the solo cam is an inferior cam system (but I won't get into that here). What I will say is that I do agree that a single cam is easier for the average person to get an acceptable tune out of. But I think they can actually be harder to micro-tune than a hybrid or the overdrive binary - both of which I've had plenty of tuning experience with as well. I will say these other cam systems are more involved and probably more challenging for the average guy to tune. It's probably one reason the solo cam will continue to be a popular option for much of the mass market that isn't obsessed with tuning like I am.
    6. Holds awesome. This is hugely personal. I used to shoot top heavy models like the early Bowtechs and the Mathews bows and while I shot them accurately, I hated the feel of them. Give me a more balanced bow (prefer it to rock back a bit with nothing on it) so that I can get some weight (B-Stinger) out front to optimize hold vs. a bow that's aleady top heavy and wants to nosedive once you get sight and good stab on it. That said, when I held the HeliM I actually thought it was better balanced than many of the Mathews models they've put out in recent years (still not to my liking though).
    7. The grip. Again, very personal. Mathews grips have sucked for years. They have moved in the right direction but many still don't like the latest version - I don't think they've solved the problem yet. I think grip is hugely important but I rarely let it decide a bow purchase because you can almost always fix it with aftermarket grips or variations of manufacturer options. When I shot Mathews I pulled the grips and used aftermarket options. With my Hoyt's I shoot one side plate only (so off the riser with just the thumb side plate). The Invasion grip is perfect as it comes.
    8. The weight. And again, everyone has a different opinion here. I think there is such this as too light and too heavy for each person. You have to find what weight fits you best but I will say that going too light will hurt stability and forget about trying to shoot in the wind. I do generally agree that a little lighter on the base bow is better so that you can add weight where you want to in order to optimize balance. Is the HeliM too light? Probably for some but it all comes down to setup and personal taste.

    In the end, my point is only to reinforce that a bow is a very personal thing and you need to find what fits you best. People shouldn't be making a decision about what is or isn't a good bow based either on your opinions ("review") or based on the comments of Mathews bashers. Go figure it out yourself.

    Happy shooting and I hope you have much success with your HeliM (although Mathews might not be happy to hear that you like it sooooo much that you'll shoot it for many years - I'm sure they'd prefer to sell you a new one next year! )
    I'm not going to read through all that, but show me where I, the OP, called it a review. It's just why I like it and why it fits me. Nothing more, nothing less. Sorry you read into it more than there was. I like many bows, and I'm sure this won't be the last one that gets me giddy. FYI, shot an invasion again and really enjoyed it. I just don't get why Mathews brings so much hate to this sight. You just don't see that around here in shops, or on the course, or anywhere for that matter.

    I hope that someday we will be able to put away our fears and prejudices and just laugh at people.

    2013 Elite Answer Max-1 "Max", 29" 60lbs GT Velocity Pros, Limb Driver, Spot Hogg Real Deal Sight, Rocket Hammer Heads(turks), Slicks(Deer)

  10. #35
    I owned a Heli-M for a few months at first i really liked it but the more i shot it the more i disliked it. I hated the grip so i changed it to a Focus grip and i liked that even less. The bow does shoot very well i could group really good with it but i just could not make myself like it. I ended up shooting a Hoyt Carbon Element and loved the way that it felt and shoot so i sold the Heli-m for that.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by frankchugga View Post
    Then perhaps you should have qualified your thread title by including "nothing but positive comments accepted".

    Actually what would be nice is IF the OP of a thread had the option to clean-up/remove negative posts like this one, in his/her own thread.

  12. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Predator View Post
    These threads are always funny. It's like someone feels the need to justify their decision and convince everyone else it's the best decision anyone could possibly make. I've done it as well and I'm sure I'll do it again. Anyway, at the risk of busting up the "love fest" (and being called a basher) I'll just offer some comments.

    First off, I'm happy you are so thrilled with this bow. That's a great place to be and having a high degree of confidence in your bow is really important and should pay dividends both on the range and in the field.

    I used to shoot Mathews but it's been a number of years since I moved away from them and frankly it's because I just haven't been impressed with their offerings as compared to some of the other options out there. Like many, I'm not any more impressed with the HeliM than their other recent offerings however I have to let you know that I haven't shot the HeliM (although I've handled it) so I have no basis upon which to form a specific and supportable position on this bow. I say all of this in full disclosure before making the following comments on your areas of focus (which some here believe to be the basis of a "great review" - which is sort of laughable - it's subjective opinions only, as are the ones I'm about to share).

    1. SMMMOOOOOTTTHHHH. I suspect most wouldn't argue that the bow is smooth. Even Mathews haters can't argue with the fact that Mathews has long had the "smooth" draw thing figured out. That said, I'm shocked how much variability in opinion you get in this area. My conclusion, however, is that your body adjusts to whatever draw cycle your bow has and when you switch to another you often don't find it as smooth (at least initially). As an example, I used to shoot a Hoyt AM32 as my primary hunting bow. Last year I switched to the Bowtech Invasion. I recently dusted off the AM32 with the intent of using for turkey season (it's a black riser and I want to used diff arrows). I HATED the draw cycle and valley compared to the Invasion (even though it used to be just fine for me) but after shooting it for a while I've re-conditioned my body to the AM32 for the purposes of turkey hunting.
    2. Accurate. Technically, no bow is more "accurate" than another. We could get any modern bow shooting just as accurate as your HeliM out of a machine. Accuracy comes primarily from tune and personal fit and while you might be able to shoot the HeliM very accurately compared to certain other bows, many other folks would be just the opposite. At the end of the day, I hope it does fit you really well and that you are able to tune it well.
    3. Quiet. So you are saying that Mathews has gone backwards in this area given that you don't perceive it to be as quiet as previous models? Interesting. I assume you didn't test with a decibal meter though. Frankly, there are very few modern bows that aren't plenty quiet enough to serve the purpose (and they are WAY better than models I shot 10 and 20 years ago - but we somehow managed to kill plenty of deer with those bows). If you want a truly quiet bow, start shooting a longbow.
    4. No vibe or feedback. Your comment is said all the time but there simply is no such thing as a bow with no vibe or feedback. It's physically impossible. Likely what you meant to say is that you find the vibe and feeback to be so minimal that it's not terribly noticeable. Again, not surprising with a modern parallel limb bow. Very few have much vibration that would or should be bothersome. As for feedback, many actually would find it a negative that they get no perceptable "feedback". Most target archers will tell you how important "feedback" actually is to their ability to consistently shoot accurately and make improvements over time.
    5. Easy to tune, Not sure what you mean by this as I have no idea what your ability to truly tune a bow is (your comments regarding binaries might cause one to question this). My opinion is that 99% of the guys/gals out there that own bows don't really know how to tune a bow and they are shooting improperly tuned bows as a result. My personal opinion is that the solo cam is an inferior cam system (but I won't get into that here). What I will say is that I do agree that a single cam is easier for the average person to get an acceptable tune out of. But I think they can actually be harder to micro-tune than a hybrid or the overdrive binary - both of which I've had plenty of tuning experience with as well. I will say these other cam systems are more involved and probably more challenging for the average guy to tune. It's probably one reason the solo cam will continue to be a popular option for much of the mass market that isn't obsessed with tuning like I am.
    6. Holds awesome. This is hugely personal. I used to shoot top heavy models like the early Bowtechs and the Mathews bows and while I shot them accurately, I hated the feel of them. Give me a more balanced bow (prefer it to rock back a bit with nothing on it) so that I can get some weight (B-Stinger) out front to optimize hold vs. a bow that's aleady top heavy and wants to nosedive once you get sight and good stab on it. That said, when I held the HeliM I actually thought it was better balanced than many of the Mathews models they've put out in recent years (still not to my liking though).
    7. The grip. Again, very personal. Mathews grips have sucked for years. They have moved in the right direction but many still don't like the latest version - I don't think they've solved the problem yet. I think grip is hugely important but I rarely let it decide a bow purchase because you can almost always fix it with aftermarket grips or variations of manufacturer options. When I shot Mathews I pulled the grips and used aftermarket options. With my Hoyt's I shoot one side plate only (so off the riser with just the thumb side plate). The Invasion grip is perfect as it comes.
    8. The weight. And again, everyone has a different opinion here. I think there is such this as too light and too heavy for each person. You have to find what weight fits you best but I will say that going too light will hurt stability and forget about trying to shoot in the wind. I do generally agree that a little lighter on the base bow is better so that you can add weight where you want to in order to optimize balance. Is the HeliM too light? Probably for some but it all comes down to setup and personal taste.

    In the end, my point is only to reinforce that a bow is a very personal thing and you need to find what fits you best. People shouldn't be making a decision about what is or isn't a good bow based either on your opinions ("review") or based on the comments of Mathews bashers. Go figure it out yourself.

    Happy shooting and I hope you have much success with your HeliM (although Mathews might not be happy to hear that you like it sooooo much that you'll shoot it for many years - I'm sure they'd prefer to sell you a new one next year! )
    Now all that is funny for someone that has admitted already he has not had much time behind the Helim. I will give you one thing it is a personal choice and will add there are lots of good bows out there today. The Helim just being one of them.
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  13. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Lurking in the Shadows..
    Posts
    14,825
    I Just shot my Z7 For 2 Days and not insulting it,Very nice Bow,But i will be trading it or Selling it,I Definitly prefer my Axe 6 over the Z7 anyday,The Axe 6 drives the same arrows at the same weight 2" Deeper into the Target,I Dolove the draw and everything about the Z7,Just not more then i love the Axe 6.But still a nice Bow,I Just want a Harder Hittin Bow like the Axe 6,Not Bashing Z7 Just from my experiences the Axe 6 hits a lot Harder.
    "I met him fifteen years ago. I was told there was nothing left. No reason,no,uh,conscience,no understanding and even the most rudimentary sense of life or death,of good or evil,right or wrong. I met this six year old child with this blank,pale,emotionless face,and the blackest eyes,the devil's eyes. I spent eight years trying to reach him and then another seven trying to keep him locked up because I realized that what was living behind that boy's eyes was purely and simply evil"...

  14. #39
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,736
    The funny thing about this is the general public just loves the Heli. We are selling 4 of them for every one of the other lines we carry - Hoyt, Elite, PSE. People unexposed to the BS on Archery Talk really like the Heli while many AT watchers come in with a little more initial negative perspective of the Heli. Frankly, it shoots great and feels very nice, but I don't have one. I still like my Apex 7, Monster, and Z7 Magnum.

  15. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Springfield, OR
    Posts
    12,533
    Quote Originally Posted by ChappyHOYT View Post
    Negative comment=bash in my book. Don't bash me calling a comment a bash.
    Can we bash you for using the words "love" and "bow" in the same sentence ? JK

    Nice review I need to shoot one of those especially after your review sounds like I'd "like" it
    Hoyt RKT Matrix
    It's just a bow.. Shoot it
    Gut Piles Make Me Happy™

  16. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Predator View Post
    These threads are always funny. It's like someone feels the need to justify their decision and convince everyone else it's the best decision anyone could possibly make. I've done it as well and I'm sure I'll do it again. Anyway, at the risk of busting up the "love fest" (and being called a basher) I'll just offer some comments.

    First off, I'm happy you are so thrilled with this bow. That's a great place to be and having a high degree of confidence in your bow is really important and should pay dividends both on the range and in the field.

    I used to shoot Mathews but it's been a number of years since I moved away from them and frankly it's because I just haven't been impressed with their offerings as compared to some of the other options out there. Like many, I'm not any Omore impressed with the HeliM than their other recent offerings however I have to let you know that I haven't shot the HeliM (although I've handled it) so I have no basis upon which to form a specific and supportable position on this bow. I say all of this in full disclosure before making the following comments on your areas of focus (which some here believe to be the basis of a "great review" - which is sort of laughable - it's subjective opinions only, as are the ones I'm about to share).

    1. SMMMOOOOOTTTHHHH. I suspect most wouldn't argue that the bow is smooth. Even Mathews haters can't argue with the fact that Mathews has long had the "smooth" draw thing figured out. That said, I'm shocked how much variability in opinion you get in this area. My conclusion, however, is that your body adjusts to whatever draw cycle your bow has and when you switch to another you often don't find it as smooth (at least initially). As an example, I used to shoot a Hoyt AM32 as my primary hunting bow. Last year I switched to the Bowtech Invasion. I recently dusted off the AM32 with the intent of using for turkey season (it's a black riser and I want to used diff arrows). I HATED the draw cycle and valley compared to the Invasion (even though it used to be just fine for me) but after shooting it for a while I've re-conditioned my body to the AM32 for the purposes of turkey hunting.
    2. Accurate. Technically, no bow is more "accurate" than another. We could get any modern bow shooting just as accurate as your HeliM out of a machine. Accuracy comes primarily from tune and personal fit and while you might be able to shoot the HeliM very accurately compared to certain other bows, many other folks would be just the opposite. At the end of the day, I hope it does fit you really well and that you are able to tune it well.
    3. Quiet. So you are saying that Mathews has gone backwards in this area given that you don't perceive it to be as quiet as previous models? Interesting. I assume you didn't test with a decibal meter though. Frankly, there are very few modern bows that aren't plenty quiet enough to serve the purpose (and they are WAY better than models I shot 10 and 20 years ago - but we somehow managed to kill plenty of deer with those bows). If you want a truly quiet bow, start shooting a longbow.
    4. No vibe or feedback. Your comment is said all the time but there simply is no such thing as a bow with no vibe or feedback. It's physically impossible. Likely what you meant to say is that you find the vibe and feeback to be so minimal that it's not terribly noticeable. Again, not surprising with a modern parallel limb bow. Very few have much vibration that would or should be bothersome. As for feedback, many actually would find it a negative that they get no perceptable "feedback". Most target archers will tell you how important "feedback" actually is to their ability to consistently shoot accurately and make improvements over time.
    5. Easy to tune, Not sure what you mean by this as I have no idea what your ability to truly tune a bow is (your comments regarding binaries might cause one to question this). My opinion is that 99% of the guys/gals out there that own bows don't really know how to tune a bow and they are shooting improperly tuned bows as a result. My personal opinion is that the solo cam is an inferior cam system (but I won't get into that here). What I will say is that I do agree that a single cam is easier for the average person to get an acceptable tune out of. But I think they can actually be harder to micro-tune than a hybrid or the overdrive binary - both of which I've had plenty of tuning experience with as well. I will say these other cam systems are more involved and probably more challenging for the average guy to tune. It's probably one reason the solo cam will continue to be a popular option for much of the mass market that isn't obsessed with tuning like I am.
    6. Holds awesome. This is hugely personal. I used to shoot top heavy models like the early Bowtechs and the Mathews bows and while I shot them accurately, I hated the feel of them. Give me a more balanced bow (prefer it to rock back a bit with nothing on it) so that I can get some weight (B-Stinger) out front to optimize hold vs. a bow that's aleady top heavy and wants to nosedive once you get sight and good stab on it. That said, when I held the HeliM I actually thought it was better balanced than many of the Mathews models they've put out in recent years (still not to my liking though).
    7. The grip. Again, very personal. Mathews grips have sucked for years. They have moved in the right direction but many still don't like the latest version - I don't think they've solved the problem yet. I think grip is hugely important but I rarely let it decide a bow purchase because you can almost always fix it with aftermarket grips or variations of manufacturer options. When I shot Mathews I pulled the grips and used aftermarket options. With my Hoyt's I shoot one side plate only (so off the riser with just the thumb side plate). The Invasion grip is perfect as it comes.
    8. The weight. And again, everyone has a different opinion here. I think there is such this as too light and too heavy for each person. You have to find what weight fits you best but I will say that going too light will hurt stability and forget about trying to shoot in the wind. I do generally agree that a little lighter on the base bow is better so that you can add weight where you want to in order to optimize balance. Is the HeliM too light? Probably for some but it all comes down to setup and personal taste.

    In the end, my point is only to reinforce that a bow is a very personal thing and you need to find what fits you best. People shouldn't be making a decision about what is or isn't a good bow based either on your opinions ("review") or based on the comments of Mathews bashers. Go figure it out yourself.

    Happy shooting and I hope you have much success with your HeliM (although Mathews might not be happy to hear that you like it sooooo much that you'll shoot it for many years - I'm sure they'd prefer to sell you a new one next year! )
    C'mon man
    Got an all black one coming with solid black strings and cables.60lbs
    2 much foam in my yard 2 get anything done.

  17. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Owensboro, KY
    Posts
    276
    Quote Originally Posted by Predator View Post
    These threads are always funny. It's like someone feels the need to justify their decision and convince everyone else it's the best decision anyone could possibly make. I've done it as well and I'm sure I'll do it again. Anyway, at the risk of busting up the "love fest" (and being called a basher) I'll just offer some comments.

    First off, I'm happy you are so thrilled with this bow. That's a great place to be and having a high degree of confidence in your bow is really important and should pay dividends both on the range and in the field.

    I used to shoot Mathews but it's been a number of years since I moved away from them and frankly it's because I just haven't been impressed with their offerings as compared to some of the other options out there. Like many, I'm not any more impressed with the HeliM than their other recent offerings however I have to let you know that I haven't shot the HeliM (although I've handled it) so I have no basis upon which to form a specific and supportable position on this bow. I say all of this in full disclosure before making the following comments on your areas of focus (which some here believe to be the basis of a "great review" - which is sort of laughable - it's subjective opinions only, as are the ones I'm about to share).

    1. SMMMOOOOOTTTHHHH. I suspect most wouldn't argue that the bow is smooth. Even Mathews haters can't argue with the fact that Mathews has long had the "smooth" draw thing figured out. That said, I'm shocked how much variability in opinion you get in this area. My conclusion, however, is that your body adjusts to whatever draw cycle your bow has and when you switch to another you often don't find it as smooth (at least initially). As an example, I used to shoot a Hoyt AM32 as my primary hunting bow. Last year I switched to the Bowtech Invasion. I recently dusted off the AM32 with the intent of using for turkey season (it's a black riser and I want to used diff arrows). I HATED the draw cycle and valley compared to the Invasion (even though it used to be just fine for me) but after shooting it for a while I've re-conditioned my body to the AM32 for the purposes of turkey hunting.
    2. Accurate. Technically, no bow is more "accurate" than another. We could get any modern bow shooting just as accurate as your HeliM out of a machine. Accuracy comes primarily from tune and personal fit and while you might be able to shoot the HeliM very accurately compared to certain other bows, many other folks would be just the opposite. At the end of the day, I hope it does fit you really well and that you are able to tune it well.
    3. Quiet. So you are saying that Mathews has gone backwards in this area given that you don't perceive it to be as quiet as previous models? Interesting. I assume you didn't test with a decibal meter though. Frankly, there are very few modern bows that aren't plenty quiet enough to serve the purpose (and they are WAY better than models I shot 10 and 20 years ago - but we somehow managed to kill plenty of deer with those bows). If you want a truly quiet bow, start shooting a longbow.
    4. No vibe or feedback. Your comment is said all the time but there simply is no such thing as a bow with no vibe or feedback. It's physically impossible. Likely what you meant to say is that you find the vibe and feeback to be so minimal that it's not terribly noticeable. Again, not surprising with a modern parallel limb bow. Very few have much vibration that would or should be bothersome. As for feedback, many actually would find it a negative that they get no perceptable "feedback". Most target archers will tell you how important "feedback" actually is to their ability to consistently shoot accurately and make improvements over time.
    5. Easy to tune, Not sure what you mean by this as I have no idea what your ability to truly tune a bow is (your comments regarding binaries might cause one to question this). My opinion is that 99% of the guys/gals out there that own bows don't really know how to tune a bow and they are shooting improperly tuned bows as a result. My personal opinion is that the solo cam is an inferior cam system (but I won't get into that here). What I will say is that I do agree that a single cam is easier for the average person to get an acceptable tune out of. But I think they can actually be harder to micro-tune than a hybrid or the overdrive binary - both of which I've had plenty of tuning experience with as well. I will say these other cam systems are more involved and probably more challenging for the average guy to tune. It's probably one reason the solo cam will continue to be a popular option for much of the mass market that isn't obsessed with tuning like I am.
    6. Holds awesome. This is hugely personal. I used to shoot top heavy models like the early Bowtechs and the Mathews bows and while I shot them accurately, I hated the feel of them. Give me a more balanced bow (prefer it to rock back a bit with nothing on it) so that I can get some weight (B-Stinger) out front to optimize hold vs. a bow that's aleady top heavy and wants to nosedive once you get sight and good stab on it. That said, when I held the HeliM I actually thought it was better balanced than many of the Mathews models they've put out in recent years (still not to my liking though).
    7. The grip. Again, very personal. Mathews grips have sucked for years. They have moved in the right direction but many still don't like the latest version - I don't think they've solved the problem yet. I think grip is hugely important but I rarely let it decide a bow purchase because you can almost always fix it with aftermarket grips or variations of manufacturer options. When I shot Mathews I pulled the grips and used aftermarket options. With my Hoyt's I shoot one side plate only (so off the riser with just the thumb side plate). The Invasion grip is perfect as it comes.
    8. The weight. And again, everyone has a different opinion here. I think there is such this as too light and too heavy for each person. You have to find what weight fits you best but I will say that going too light will hurt stability and forget about trying to shoot in the wind. I do generally agree that a little lighter on the base bow is better so that you can add weight where you want to in order to optimize balance. Is the HeliM too light? Probably for some but it all comes down to setup and personal taste.

    In the end, my point is only to reinforce that a bow is a very personal thing and you need to find what fits you best. People shouldn't be making a decision about what is or isn't a good bow based either on your opinions ("review") or based on the comments of Mathews bashers. Go figure it out yourself.

    Happy shooting and I hope you have much success with your HeliM (although Mathews might not be happy to hear that you like it sooooo much that you'll shoot it for many years - I'm sure they'd prefer to sell you a new one next year! )
    Some people just suck the fun out of everything
    Mathews ChillX
    Easton A/C/C
    QAD & Bodoodle
    Sure-Loc Lethal Weapon
    Fuse Carbon Connection

  18. #43
    The word "bash" should be banned from this site. Threads like this go absolutely nowhere.

  19. #44
    I have shot the helium alot now and it an awesome little bow.it feels alot lighter than my carbon element and I shoot the helium better.
    ONE PIN IS ALL YOU NEED, IF you have warp speed. Founder of Team OVERKILL.Shooting super warp speed bows built by Breathn .............................. ....Heavy draw weight ,franken head shooting deer slayer........................ ...Moderation is for cowards ."............................ .....................Team 4. IN 4 THE WIN

  20. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    N. Ca/ N, Co
    Posts
    105
    [QUOTE=SEIowaArcher;1063885247]I shot one last weekend, great little bow, and by far the lightest feeling bow I've ever shot. If I ever draw a tag for elk out in the mountains I'll definitely be outfitting myself with a Helim. I'd probably take the plunge now if they made a 35" or 36" ATA version.[/QUOTE

    Yea I would like to see the Heli-m in a 35" ATA.

  21. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    McAlester, Oklahoma
    Posts
    1,272
    I can honestly say I'm no huge fan of Mathews and that is solely because of their grip. Yes I know I can buy a focus grip but if I'm gonna drop 700-1000 on a bare now I don't believe I should have to pay the extra 50 for a grip yeah the tacticals come with the focus grip but that's already figured into the price when it's ordered. As for the heli-m I thought it shot great but the physical weight of the bow was a big factor for me it felt like a toy in my hands it was so light and I could see that being an issue in heavy wind or at long distance. I may be way off base here I've never shot it past 20yds. Not trying to bash just giving my honest opinion on the bow but congratulations to the op for finding a bow he loves I know I sure wish I could

  22. #47
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    660
    I really like my Helim too.... No, I don't think its the best Mathews very made.... BUT it's a good one.. IMO !!!!!!
    2014 Chill R #2 , QAD HDX, MBG Ambush, 5" Axion, Easton Injexion, Rage Hypodermic
    2013 Chill, QAD HDX, MBG Ambush , 5" Axion, Easton Injexion, Rage Hypodermic

  23. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    SW IA.
    Posts
    354
    Quote Originally Posted by deadquiet View Post
    Can't get past the riser.............
    The latest Mathews risers remind me of the Limbsaver bow....


  24. #49
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    5,109
    Thanks for starting a Mathews support group.

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