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Thread: Nocking point vs. arrow rest

  1. #1
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    Nocking point vs. arrow rest

    If you need to adjust your nocking point, is there anything wrong with adjusting the arrow rest instead?....assuming of course that you maintain good contact between the plunger and the center 1/3 of the arrow shaft?..

    It just seems alot easier than messing with my double tie-on nock point.

    Thanks
    -Dan in WA
    (and no, I'm not a bowhunter)

  2. #2
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    You've got it. It's really hard to move the arrow rest up and down while keeping the plunger centered on your shaft. I actually don't see a way where this can be done period with a normal plunger/rest combination...
    Eric C.
    FITA Recurve.
    USA Archery Intermediate Instructor
    I eat chocolate.

  3. #3
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    Well, I don't think it's impossible, but it is a very narrow window of adjustibility.
    So it sounds like besides the plugger centering, theoretically, lowering the arrow rest height is the same as raising the nocking point and vice versa?
    -Dan in WA
    (and no, I'm not a bowhunter)

  4. #4
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    It may also depend on the arrow shaft diameters, so what may be possible on one setup may really not be worth trying on the other.

    Theoretically, I don't actually think it's the same either, since you're moving the arrow closer to the pivot point/center of the bow. Versus moving strictly on string would not be moving this distance. Does it make a large difference within this adjustability range, I don't know.

    If you're tuning though, what I do is I rough out my nocking point with a piece of masking tape first, after It's been confirmed, you can then tie on your full nock point. The slightly different weight on string may make a slight difference, but I've never seen it significant enough to take more than one more adjustment afterwards to fix, most of the time, it's close enough.
    Eric C.
    FITA Recurve.
    USA Archery Intermediate Instructor
    I eat chocolate.

  5. #5
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    The Beiter rests are micro adjustable but not for wholesale movement of the nocking point. Most don't like them since they can sound like nails on a chalkboard as your arrow draws over them.
    The aim is useless without the way.
    www.denverarchery.com

  6. #6
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    DIV -

    In theory you are correct, in practice - not so much. There's really only one point were the arrow will be centered on the plunger, so moving it up or down will give you uneven ware on the plunger button. Also the only practical way of changing the rest height is with an adjustable rest. Peeling one off, cleaning the riser and affixing a new ain't fun either...

    During tuning just use masking tape as temporary nocking points until you are set. THEN attach your real nocking point or points.

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

  7. #7
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    if youve tied and burned (or even glued) your nock points you may be able to tighten a pair of small vice grips onto the nock with just the right amount of pressure and getting them to then twist up or down the string. if youre REALLY good you can get it to turn with normal pliers. when you get them into the new position they seem to stay in place pretty good if you dont move them all the time. im just good at tieing nocking points cause i fiddle with stuff so much
    GOOD FUN AND GOOD SHOOTING, Ryan.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Viper1 View Post
    DIV -

    In theory you are correct, in practice - not so much. There's really only one point were the arrow will be centered on the plunger, so moving it up or down will give you uneven ware on the plunger button. Also the only practical way of changing the rest height is with an adjustable rest. Peeling one off, cleaning the riser and affixing a new ain't fun either...

    During tuning just use masking tape as temporary nocking points until you are set. THEN attach your real nocking point or points.

    Viper1 out.
    Good point, and one more reason to get a Beiter. The button rotates freely within the barrel. By placing the arrow just slightly off-center, the arrow causes the button to rotate and it wears evenly. Several years and my plunger button is as flat as new. I doubt this feature is exclusive to Beiter, but something to be aware of. My first plunger wore into a "u" shape because it never changed orientation.


    "Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened." - Dr. Seuss

  9. #9
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    Thanks everyone
    Great comments from everyone. I like that masking tape idea as a temporary nock point.
    -Dan in WA
    (and no, I'm not a bowhunter)

  10. #10
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    A somewhat related question. Does using masking tape to set the nocking point and then crimping on a slightly heavier brass nocking point change the tune in a way that a mere mortal (or even somewhat less than mortal) archer would notice? Is this a good reason to lose the brass nocking point and learn how to do a tied nocking point?

  11. #11
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    Gene -

    Technically it would if the weight were different. In reality, I've never noticed a measurable change.

    I gotta tell ya, I've used everything from crimp-on, to tie-on to heat-shrink-on to anything else that's been used in the last 40 years. Never noticed a problem with any of them. These days, I just use the crimp-ons and don't give it a second thought.

    I'm sure there will be other opinions on this...

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

  12. #12
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    One simple alternative to avoid having to re-tie nocking points is a Beiter serving shifter. You move the entire centre serving a few strands at a time to the desired height and then compress each end of the serving to hold it in place. I've found this really simple to use and invaluable as a time saver when tuning.



    Ryan B. Surely putting glue, a substance that hardens, into your string, which is flexible, is going to wear out your string. Just a thought.

    Niall

  13. #13
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    Re glue on string: yes, youre right. I take great care to put only a small amount on the nock itself, nothing gets on the actual serving or string . The tightness of the nock holds it in place. The glue just keeps the thread/nock from fraying; kind of just a coating for the nock.

    GOOD FUN AND GOOD SHOOTING, Ryan.


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