a href="http://www.lancasterarchery.com/archery-classic-register/#header">
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 27

Thread: Shooting "styles". Is there a "right" one?

  1. #1

    Shooting "styles". Is there a "right" one?

    Ive been getting back into the traditional and instinctive shooting game. I started in archery many moons ago as a whipper snapper shooting an old recurve (remember being a lot better at it than too ).

    Ive been shooting my longbow a lot more over the last year, and can admit its been a inconsistent, frustrating venture. One day im on fire, the next im all over the place.

    For the most part, my shooting has improved. But ive noticed that I use two different "styles" of shooting depending on distance.



    For the most part, ive been shooting I guess what they call "Hill style", that hunched over high shoulder style with a heavily canted bow. I hold my bow arm out, lift my bow arm shoulder so it touches my jaw bone while kind of scrunching down my head, and with three fingers under come to full draw, touch my thumb to the corner of my mouth and make my shot. I dont hold long, probably only 2-4 seconds on average. Ive been reading up on shooting styles, and I see many condemn this hunched up style of shooting.

    This has been working ok I guess, and ive noticed that out to 25 yards or so im consciously using a "gap" aiming style. But at farther distances my shooting style changes dramatically. At 30, 40 yards im shooting a much more vertical bow, my bow shoulder drops, my head comes "up", and my form is much closer to a more vertical, typical compound shooting form. I noticed today too, that im at least not consciously thinking about a "gap" when I aim at longer distances, so im guessing its a more true "instinctive" aiming method at farther distances.

    Now to my question. Is one form or style superior to others? Should I be training myself to stick to one "style" or just go with what ive been doing if it works?


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    F.U.
    Posts
    11,335
    Use the one that works the best. There is no single correct method unless your one of those people who is too easily brainwashed by clever marketing.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    LI. NY
    Posts
    15,353
    KG -

    If you're new or returning to the sport, you're probably best served by choosing one style (that works) and sticking with it. Once that's solid, then your plan for shooting will dictate how many variations you'll need (or want) and more importantly, how many you can make work.

    Regarding that hunched over "Hill style".
    12-11 Hill_2.jpg
    Is this the "Hill" you are talking about?

    As far as one style being "superior" to another, that might depend on who you talking to. Good form and solid mechanics are just that, how you adapt them is something else.

    Viper1 out.
    “Simple and innocent, however, as it (the bow) appears, and capable as it is of being a trusty friend and ally, a bow is at the same time a watchful enemy, ready to take advantage of the smallest slight.”

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by kill_goose View Post
    Is one form or style superior to others?
    When speaking in generalities...Yes...but it ultimately depends upon the individual. Some forms or styles of shooting a bow and arrow will have advantages over others under specific circumstances. Just research a specific goal and you can begin to see what and how those archers shoot to achieve those goals.

    Quote Originally Posted by kill_goose View Post
    Should I be training myself to stick to one "style" or just go with what ive been doing if it works?
    If it's truly working for you...than stick to it...but if you feel like there could be some improvement...research some different styles to see if they might have some advantages based on your goals.

    Ray

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    2,562
    I think there are two things to consider: which methods are most appropriate for the type of shooting you do, and which methods you enjoy to use the most. Barebow offers opportunity for creativity. It is not a bad idea to give a few approaches a try and see what resonates with you.
    Barebow Recurve

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Viper1 View Post
    KG -

    If you're new or returning to the sport, you're probably best served by choosing one style (that works) and sticking with it. Once that's solid, then your plan for shooting will dictate how many variations you'll need (or want) and more importantly, how many you can make work.

    Regarding that hunched over "Hill style".
    12-11 Hill_2.jpg
    Is this the "Hill" you are talking about?

    As far as one style being "superior" to another, that might depend on who you talking to. Good form and solid mechanics are just that, how you adapt them is something else.

    Viper1 out.
    Closer to this actually. But not as severe (I dont think).

    HowardHill.jpg



    But, the photo you posted is closer to what my form turns into as the distance to the target increases.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    BC, Canada and Whidbey Island, WA
    Posts
    5,186
    Notice how Hill's form doesn't actually change from the two pictures. He merely bends at the waist and knees, he maintains the same low shoulder and upright head for both.

    -Grant

  8. #8
    So is "proper" form for a traditional bow a low shoulder and upright head?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    BC, Canada and Whidbey Island, WA
    Posts
    5,186
    Can't get much better than Jimmy:
    http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=1665451

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    northern, Wisconsin
    Posts
    7,677
    Hill did not shoot all hunched over unless he had too - here is a video of him shooting:


  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by kill_goose View Post
    Ive been getting back into the traditional and instinctive shooting game. I started in archery many moons ago as a whipper snapper shooting an old recurve (remember being a lot better at it than too ).

    Ive been shooting my longbow a lot more over the last year, and can admit its been a inconsistent, frustrating venture. One day im on fire, the next im all over the place.

    For the most part, my shooting has improved. But ive noticed that I use two different "styles" of shooting depending on distance.

    For the most part, ive been shooting I guess what they call "Hill style", that hunched over high shoulder style with a heavily canted bow. I hold my bow arm out, lift my bow arm shoulder so it touches my jaw bone while kind of scrunching down my head, and with three fingers under come to full draw, touch my thumb to the corner of my mouth and make my shot. I dont hold long, probably only 2-4 seconds on average. Ive been reading up on shooting styles, and I see many condemn this hunched up style of shooting.

    This has been working ok I guess, and ive noticed that out to 25 yards or so im consciously using a "gap" aiming style. But at farther distances my shooting style changes dramatically. At 30, 40 yards im shooting a much more vertical bow, my bow shoulder drops, my head comes "up", and my form is much closer to a more vertical, typical compound shooting form. I noticed today too, that im at least not consciously thinking about a "gap" when I aim at longer distances, so im guessing its a more true "instinctive" aiming method at farther distances.

    Now to my question. Is one form or style superior to others? Should I be training myself to stick to one "style" or just go with what ive been doing if it works?
    Of course there is.... it is the one you are comfortable with and can repeatable comfortable accuracy... and where you have a proper anchor and use your natural musculature to draw and hold... and can have repeatable accuracy..... with comfort.... that is the proper form and style for you.

    I draw looking at my target center, then as I come to full anchor, I just take a gander down my arrow to the center of my target and about that time I'm releasing my arrow... Don't know what you call it.... but my arrow I think confirms my windage, my shot is based upon hours and years of shooting from 5 to 30 yards and 22 mostly right now in my shooting lane... soon to be moved to my 3 acres where I can get up to 100 yards or more if I need...


    Aloha...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    1,517
    I say that if you can shoot a bow consistently with the same form, then you are better off. I use a hybrid self taught mediocre form but it is consistent so I hit where I aim.

    I am blessed with a wife that shares my addictions
    All that expensive gear and still no X's

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Blacktail country
    Posts
    1,607
    whatever works best for you
    Despite what your momma told you,
    violence does solve problems

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    705
    Quote Originally Posted by grantmac View Post



    Any new archer should watch this one!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Talladega, Alabama
    Posts
    27,097
    Quote Originally Posted by Viper1 View Post
    KG -

    If you're new or returning to the sport, you're probably best served by choosing one style (that works) and sticking with it. Once that's solid, then your plan for shooting will dictate how many variations you'll need (or want) and more importantly, how many you can make work.

    Regarding that hunched over "Hill style".
    12-11 Hill_2.jpg
    Is this the "Hill" you are talking about?

    As far as one style being "superior" to another, that might depend on who you talking to. Good form and solid mechanics are just that, how you adapt them is something else.

    Viper1 out.
    Here is my form back then when he was doing his thing. How is my form? Just joshing.....I would think that if you can consistantly hit the bulls eye, that is the best form for you....thats just my assessment and it don't mean much!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Athens Archery Factory Staff Shooter
    Life is too short to live without a Sharps Quigley
    Broughton Art and knives com]
    DCA Staff Shooter
    Athens Afflixtion

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    pa
    Posts
    3,516
    Quote Originally Posted by sharpbroadhead View Post
    Hill did not shoot all hunched over unless he had too - here is a video of him shooting:

    good grief did he actually shoot apples off heads like that? damn talk about confidence in your abilities eh
    09' Diamond Iceman
    Samick Sage
    07' Parker Hornet
    Hoyt Excel

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Talladega, Alabama
    Posts
    27,097
    Howard Hill was a very good archer and I've seen some fantastic shots he made. I think he was a world champion for years......I saw him at the theater once shoot a running antelope in Africa at 100 yds going left to right. He had to lead that animal big time and nailed him......
    Athens Archery Factory Staff Shooter
    Life is too short to live without a Sharps Quigley
    Broughton Art and knives com]
    DCA Staff Shooter
    Athens Afflixtion

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    East central Minnesota
    Posts
    8,349
    We all have our own "style", but I'll bet if you looked at the best shooters you would find a lot in common between them. We are all build relatively the same way, so it's no surprise that there are solid fundamentals of shooting form that work for everybody. Small variations in the fundamentals to suit individual body type and temperament are what gives each of us our own "style".

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    East central Minnesota
    Posts
    8,349
    Quote Originally Posted by rembrandt View Post
    Howard Hill was a very good archer and I've seen some fantastic shots he made. I think he was a world champion for years......I saw him at the theater once shoot a running antelope in Africa at 100 yds going left to right. He had to lead that animal big time and nailed him......
    I don't care how good you are that's a lucky shot. Wonder how many antelope and arrows he went through to get it on film...

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by rembrandt View Post
    Here is my form back then when he was doing his thing. How is my form? Just joshing.....I would think that if you can consistantly hit the bulls eye, that is the best form for you....thats just my assessment and it don't mean much!
    That right there is how ive been shooting!


    I made a conscious effort to stand up straighter today. Cant say I shot any better but I immediately noticed I didnt fatigue as fast.

  21. #21
    What books does everyone recommend on this subject?

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Talladega, Alabama
    Posts
    27,097
    Viper's "Shooting the Stickbow" is one to consider.....Also, watch RangerB's video in the Sticky on top of this forum.....good examples on how to shoot correctly!
    Athens Archery Factory Staff Shooter
    Life is too short to live without a Sharps Quigley
    Broughton Art and knives com]
    DCA Staff Shooter
    Athens Afflixtion

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    East central Minnesota
    Posts
    8,349

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Spring, Texas
    Posts
    137
    Like Viper said, good form and solid mechanics....to me that's the "style" to work towards, the rest of it is a matter of what works best for you or what feels the best to you....IMHO
    Dakota Pro Hunter 47# @ 28
    Roland Jenkins DC Hunter Recurve 45# @ 28
    Omega Longbow 66", 47# @ 28
    Sarrels Sierra Longbow 64", 47# @ 28

  25. #25
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    884
    Quote Originally Posted by kill_goose View Post
    Ive been getting back into the traditional and instinctive shooting game. I started in archery many moons ago as a whipper snapper shooting an old recurve (remember being a lot better at it than too ).

    Ive been shooting my longbow a lot more over the last year, and can admit its been a inconsistent, frustrating venture. One day im on fire, the next im all over the place.

    For the most part, my shooting has improved. But ive noticed that I use two different "styles" of shooting depending on distance.

    For the most part, ive been shooting I guess what they call "Hill style", that hunched over high shoulder style with a heavily canted bow. I hold my bow arm out, lift my bow arm shoulder so it touches my jaw bone while kind of scrunching down my head, and with three fingers under come to full draw, touch my thumb to the corner of my mouth and make my shot. I dont hold long, probably only 2-4 seconds on average. Ive been reading up on shooting styles, and I see many condemn this hunched up style of shooting.

    This has been working ok I guess, and ive noticed that out to 25 yards or so im consciously using a "gap" aiming style. But at farther distances my shooting style changes dramatically. At 30, 40 yards im shooting a much more vertical bow, my bow shoulder drops, my head comes "up", and my form is much closer to a more vertical, typical compound shooting form. I noticed today too, that im at least not consciously thinking about a "gap" when I aim at longer distances, so im guessing its a more true "instinctive" aiming method at farther distances.

    Now to my question. Is one form or style superior to others? Should I be training myself to stick to one "style" or just go with what ive been doing if it works?
    Being around both field and target archery since the mid 1970's I can tell you that although there are certain recommended physical rules of archery that have been a proven time and time again, it all comes down to being able to reproduce your shooting consistently. I once knew this older guy when I was a kid who had a dead (finger shooter) release, but because he did it consistent;y he normally out shot 95% of the shooters in his day.


    Bob Furman
    Phoenix, AZ

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •