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Thread: Tuning X10's/ACE's

  1. #1

    Tuning X10's/ACE's

    There seems to be a misconception around that tuning barrelled shafts is tricky, hard, convoluted etc.- after receiving a set of these arrows and doing a tune on them I decided to post this thread to show that it really is quite simple.

    You'll need:
    Shafts
    Breakoff points
    Low temp hot melt (Bohning cool flex or Easton)
    Nocks or nocks and pins (I used pins and Beiter pin-outs)
    Vanes/wings and glue

    First of all, install pins (if applicable) with hot melt. Cool them down, pick of the hardened hot melt with your finger nails, and install the nocks. You can fletch 9 or so shafts at this point if you wish. From here on leave the back end alone, don't cut it unless as a last resort.

    Now, cut your arrows so they will be too soft- not excessively, just so you know they will come up too soft. An Easton chart will do for this. This is just a starting point. Glue in 4-6 points with the low temp hot melt, half fletched, half bareshafts.

    Set tiller and nocking point to whatever, eg +1/8" and 1/4"

    Then using the tuning method recommended by James Park:
    Start with plunger stiff (no movement) and exact centreshot
    Shoot bareshafts and fletched shafts. Correct nocking point if needed.
    If bareshafts are left, arrows are too stiff- increase draw weight.
    If bareshafts are very soft- back to the arrow saw, or reduce weight. Cut small sections eg. 1/8-1/4" until your fletched and bareshafts are grouping together in the gold at 18m. Fine tune with draw weight.
    Set sight
    Now set your plunger to "something nice" (about 500 grams at 3mm displacement) and move it slightly outside of centreshot



    *With barrelled shafts they should be slightly closer to centreshot than parallel shafts should be*

    Now, without moving the sight, adjust the plungers position until the arrows group back in the middle. If arrows hit left, move plunger right and vice versa. Leave plunger at about 500g and save it for fine tuning later.

    Shooting at 18m, check that all your arrows are grouping in the 10 on a 40 face (or whatever your shooting ability allows, you're looking for fliers). Any arrows that aren't grouping as well, index nocks to bring them back to the group. If this doesn't fix it then check nock, pin, fletchings etc. Unless you're an olympian and sorting through dozens of arrows for a good set, you should be able to get every arrow in the dozen grouping pretty well.

    Powder/lipstick test for clearance

    Shoot or go on to fine tuning at longer distances

    Not really any harder to tune than other arrows. Avoid cutting the back, unless you're running out of arrow length and need to stiffen the arrow right up. Cutting from the back generally stiffens twice as much as cutting from the front.


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    479
    Quote Originally Posted by Bean Burrito View Post
    Shooting at 18m, check that all your arrows are grouping in the 10 on a 40 face (or whatever your shooting ability allows, you're looking for fliers). Any arrows that aren't grouping as well, index nocks to bring them back to the group. If this doesn't fix it then check nock, pin, fletchings etc. Unless you're an olympian and sorting through dozens of arrows for a good set, you should be able to get every arrow in the dozen grouping pretty well.
    checking for fliers at 18 meters is a bit useless i think, you should at least do 50 meters preferable bare shafted. My fliers tend to go in the blue-black at 50 meters bare, while fetched they would still hit the yellow.
    I'm a guy, just so you know

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by julle View Post
    checking for fliers at 18 meters is a bit useless i think, you should at least do 50 meters preferable bare shafted. My fliers tend to go in the blue-black at 50 meters bare, while fetched they would still hit the yellow.
    Here fliers means arrows with contact- usually fixable with nock rotation. Definitely observable at 18m for a good shooter. As I said you can then go onto fine tuning afterwards, where you would weed out/fix arrows like that.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    838
    Quote Originally Posted by Bean Burrito View Post
    There seems to be a misconception around that tuning barrelled shafts is tricky, hard, convoluted etc.- after receiving a set of these arrows and doing a tune on them I decided to post this thread to show that it really is quite simple.

    You'll need:
    Shafts
    Breakoff points
    Low temp hot melt (Bohning cool flex or Easton)
    Nocks or nocks and pins (I used pins and Beiter pin-outs)
    Vanes/wings and glue

    First of all, install pins (if applicable) with hot melt. Cool them down, pick of the hardened hot melt with your finger nails, and install the nocks. You can fletch 9 or so shafts at this point if you wish. From here on leave the back end alone, don't cut it unless as a last resort.

    Now, cut your arrows so they will be too soft- not excessively, just so you know they will come up too soft. An Easton chart will do for this. This is just a starting point. Glue in 4-6 points with the low temp hot melt, half fletched, half bareshafts.

    Set tiller and nocking point to whatever, eg +1/8" and 1/4"

    Then using the tuning method recommended by James Park:
    Start with plunger stiff (no movement) and exact centreshot
    Shoot bareshafts and fletched shafts. Correct nocking point if needed.
    If bareshafts are left, arrows are too stiff- increase draw weight.
    If bareshafts are very soft- back to the arrow saw, or reduce weight. Cut small sections eg. 1/8-1/4" until your fletched and bareshafts are grouping together in the gold at 18m. Fine tune with draw weight.
    Set sight
    Now set your plunger to "something nice" (about 500 grams at 3mm displacement) and move it slightly outside of centreshot

    *With barrelled shafts they should be slightly closer to centreshot than parallel shafts should be*

    Now, without moving the sight, adjust the plungers position until the arrows group back in the middle. If arrows hit left, move plunger right and vice versa. Leave plunger at about 500g and save it for fine tuning later.

    Shooting at 18m, check that all your arrows are grouping in the 10 on a 40 face (or whatever your shooting ability allows, you're looking for fliers). Any arrows that aren't grouping as well, index nocks to bring them back to the group. If this doesn't fix it then check nock, pin, fletchings etc. Unless you're an olympian and sorting through dozens of arrows for a good set, you should be able to get every arrow in the dozen grouping pretty well.

    Powder/lipstick test for clearance

    Shoot or go on to fine tuning at longer distances

    Not really any harder to tune than other arrows. Avoid cutting the back, unless you're running out of arrow length and need to stiffen the arrow right up. Cutting from the back generally stiffens twice as much as cutting from the front.

    referring to the Bold text, am I shooting both bare shaft and Fletched shaft?
    Bob Furman
    Phoenix, AZ

    If it was Easy, everybody would be doing it!!!

  5. #5
    Hi,

    It doesn't really matter, both if you want. There will be little difference in POI.

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