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Thread: Finger bow and release bow...what's the difference?

  1. #1
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    Finger bow and release bow...what's the difference?

    I've looked around and can't find a specific answer. Let me start out by saying that I'm a newbie again...out for about 15 years. I know that technology changes as to people. People when I was shooting did use releases but there wasn't a specific bow that was geared one way or another.

    Going by what I know, which may be limited, the only reason for release specific is that current bows may have shorter axial length and narrow cams...still doesn't mean they can't be shot with fingers, right?

    Is it the design of the bows or is it a trend thing...you have to shoot with a release to be accurate.



    If I had a release only bow and I had good form, would it make a difference?

    Just trying to learn more about technology/changing times...
    USA Level 2 Instructor
    2012 PSE Supra ME, 47#,ACC, Davis sight;2012 Dominator Pro 3D 55#; DS Advantage; ACC's
    Win-Win Inno Carbon Riser/Tropics 36#(38 tof), Redline arrows 690- DS Advantage-282grn@ 195fps
    2010 Hoyt Vantage Pro, XT 2000, Sprls, Sure Loc W BE 6X, ACC's 408g @ 259


  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Fury90flier View Post
    I've looked around and can't find a specific answer. Let me start out by saying that I'm a newbie again...out for about 15 years. I know that technology changes as to people. People when I was shooting did use releases but there wasn't a specific bow that was geared one way or another.

    Going by what I know, which may be limited, the only reason for release specific is that current bows may have shorter axial length and narrow cams...still doesn't mean they can't be shot with fingers, right?

    Is it the design of the bows or is it a trend thing...you have to shoot with a release to be accurate.

    If I had a release only bow and I had good form, would it make a difference?

    Just trying to learn more about technology/changing times...
    Has to do with string pinch on the fingers.

    So,
    a target recurve bow would be say 70-inches long, for someone in the 30-inch draw length range, assuming you shoot split finger (index finger ABOVE the nock).
    So,
    a target recurve bow would be say 68-inches long, for someone in the 28-inch-ish draw length range, assuming you shoot split finger (index finger ABOVE the nock).
    So,
    a target recurve bow would be say 66-inches long, for someone int he 26-inch/27-ish draw length range, assuming you shoot split finger (index finger ABOVE the nock).


    Soooooo,
    let's say you shoot 3 FINGERS UNDER.

    Well,
    then shooting a 62-inch long recurve bow is no problem,
    cuz there is NO NOCK PINCH, when you shoot 3 FINGERS under.


    So,
    now a TARGET compound bow Axle to Axle might be 40-inches,
    which is considered on the LONG side, for a compound bow.

    Then,
    you have hunting bows in the 32-36 inch range for Axle to Axle measurement.


    As you probably remember,
    when shooting FINGERS...

    as the length of the bow gets SHORTER and SHORTER,
    the string angle gets TIGHTER
    and
    the shorter the bow gets,
    the more TOUCHY the bow becomes for a FINGERS shooter,
    and the more FOCUS you need to minimize HIGH and LOW misses.
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Fury90flier View Post
    I've looked around and can't find a specific answer. Let me start out by saying that I'm a newbie again...out for about 15 years. I know that technology changes as to people. People when I was shooting did use releases but there wasn't a specific bow that was geared one way or another.

    Going by what I know, which may be limited, the only reason for release specific is that current bows may have shorter axial length and narrow cams...still doesn't mean they can't be shot with fingers, right?

    Is it the design of the bows or is it a trend thing...you have to shoot with a release to be accurate.

    If I had a release only bow and I had good form, would it make a difference?

    Just trying to learn more about technology/changing times...


    Sooo,
    if you have good form
    and you WANT to shoot a compound bow with FINGERS...

    I suggest 3 FINGERS under
    and
    something in the 40-inch ATA range or even LONGER (older compound bows).
    www.nutsandboltsarchery.com
    http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showth...=who+wants+dvd
    Send me an email for DVD = $25.00....

    alanlui@comcast.net

  4. #4
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    Ok, I see now.

    Regarding nock pinch, I typically use 2 one above and one below. This seems to eliminate or significantly reduce knock pinch. I don't know if this would have much effect on today's bows.
    USA Level 2 Instructor
    2012 PSE Supra ME, 47#,ACC, Davis sight;2012 Dominator Pro 3D 55#; DS Advantage; ACC's
    Win-Win Inno Carbon Riser/Tropics 36#(38 tof), Redline arrows 690- DS Advantage-282grn@ 195fps
    2010 Hoyt Vantage Pro, XT 2000, Sprls, Sure Loc W BE 6X, ACC's 408g @ 259

  5. #5
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    Also the amount of let off can affect a finger shooter as higher let off bows are a little harder to get a clean release with lighter poundages. I always prefered 40 - 50% while shooting fingers, especially indoor target. My favorite bow, (an old Continental from about 1994) 42" ATA 9 1/2" BH has some old parallel wheels made by Pearson Archery.
    It's getting harder to find good compound bows for a finger shooter and an older bow may be the answer.
    The short bows are harder to shoot whether you shoot 3 under or split finger. Just too much finger pinch.

    Good Luck
    RIVERSIDE ARCHERY & RANGE
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  6. #6
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    i draw with three and drop the index finger off at full draw to minimize contact with the string. other things to consider are draw length, cam size and the limb flexes at full draw, all of the above will have an effect on the angle of the string and should be considered when purchasing a bow for finger shooting. I also second that a higher holding weight can help as well though i have shot 80% bows quite well as far as hunting accuracy goes.

  7. #7
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    Ok, sounds like it's a combination of bow design and personal preference. I can't say that I'll never use a release, just probably won't. But who knows, right. I may one day find the right combination that works for me.
    USA Level 2 Instructor
    2012 PSE Supra ME, 47#,ACC, Davis sight;2012 Dominator Pro 3D 55#; DS Advantage; ACC's
    Win-Win Inno Carbon Riser/Tropics 36#(38 tof), Redline arrows 690- DS Advantage-282grn@ 195fps
    2010 Hoyt Vantage Pro, XT 2000, Sprls, Sure Loc W BE 6X, ACC's 408g @ 259

  8. #8
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    Finger bow and release bow...what's the difference?

    You seemed to have missed the point. Shorter axle to axle bows produce more finger pinch, not nock pinch. And there are many 40" range bows available. I wouldn't go for anything less than 37" ata. Best thing to do is try a bow to see how the finger pinch may or may not be there. And then maybe the right shorter bow just might work for you.
    I shot a older Pearson compound, 38", like you, but drew with three and dropped off the bottom finger (one above, one below). I got along with it to the disbelief of the original owner.
    And once I went with a mechanical release I never went back to fingers....Just so dang more accurate and consistant.
    Pearson MarXman, Limb Driver, Muddy Virtue HT3s, Bohning vanes, Sure Loc Challenger,
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  9. #9
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    When I was referring to nock pinch, I'm referring to fingers pressing into the arrow. Adding an extra nock to the string helps to keep the fingers off the arrow. But you probably get that.

    Now that I'm thinking a bit more clearly, I can see where the sharper angle of the string could be uncomfortable.

    As to more accurate...I think that's subjective. I've tried releases and they just don't agree with me. I've done the finger release, wrist support release (lack of a better term) finger fired, thumb fired and they werent comfortable and my groups opened up. Some would say practice and get used to it. I say, If I apply the same logic and practice on my release technique my groups would shrink too.

    For me it's just a disconnected feeling and the delay in firing is just too great. With the release I have to pull the trigger too time consuming, with finger release I just relax.

    Since I'm getting back into the sport, I may try the releases again and may have a different opinion...who knows. That's a great thing about this hobby/sport...everyone can have their own way that works for them and have just as much fun as the next guy.

    thanks for the info...definitely something to consider when choosing my next bow.
    USA Level 2 Instructor
    2012 PSE Supra ME, 47#,ACC, Davis sight;2012 Dominator Pro 3D 55#; DS Advantage; ACC's
    Win-Win Inno Carbon Riser/Tropics 36#(38 tof), Redline arrows 690- DS Advantage-282grn@ 195fps
    2010 Hoyt Vantage Pro, XT 2000, Sprls, Sure Loc W BE 6X, ACC's 408g @ 259

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