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Thread: What makes one bow more accurate than another?

  1. #1
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    What makes one bow more accurate than another?

    The inherent accuracy of a firearm, is dependant on the mechanical tolerances of the firearm components, as pertains to the barrel being in the same exact position during firing. When it comes to compound archery, what makes one bow inherantly more accurate than another. You cannot readily adjust the mechanical part of a firearm, to "tune" it and affect the accuracy. A bow, you can. What makes a competition bow, more accurate than a lower end (under $500) hunting bow, if both bows are perfectly tuned? Does the competition bow, simply have more "forgiveness" during the shot, to forgive shooter errors, built into the design of the bow? If a high end competition bow was mounted in a rest, and mechanically shot the same every time, and shoots in the same arrow hole every time, at 50 meters, can a lower end (under $500) hunting bow, be chucked into the same fixed rest, mechanically shot the same every time, and can it attain the same accuracy of the high end competition bow?



  2. #2
    try the test & see all things being equal except the price of the bow.. I'm guessing it's the nut behind the Bow that makes the biggest difference..
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by ahunter55 View Post
    try the test & see all things being equal except the price of the bow.. I'm guessing it's the nut behind the Bow that makes the biggest difference..
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  4. #4
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    I think it has less to do with the mechanics of the bow and more to do with shootability and forgiveness. If you put a hunting bow and target bow in a shooting machine I bet you would find little difference. Some bows are more accurate than other just because they are easier to shoot.

  5. #5
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    can't tune a fire arm? not true at all. A bolt action rifle for example, barrel can be tightened to the proper torque- kink of like a variable tuning fork, action squared and trued, ammunition tuned to shoot at the proper node, stock mated to the action properly... These modifications would be done to make tighter shot to shot consistency.

    Bows would be any different? The bow returning to the same at rest position would be. Or a bow being crating and absorbing the frequencies exactly the same from shot to shot would increase accuracy. In a shooters hands the bow that is more forgiving of the archers form/release would be of benefit.

    Since we don't shoot with mechanical shooters, forgiveness would be most important in my opinion and there would be a wide verity in that respect. Put all bows in a mechanical shooter and you'll probably find that all bows are capable of making one hole groups...some will do it at a faster speed.
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    The shooter.....

  7. #7
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    The hands the bow is put into

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    For me, it seems that the grip, a little longer ATA and being able to tweek the draw length are the factors that aid my accuracy. I've had many great bows, all would shoot well, but some I shot more accurately with. The factors listed seem to be the difference. Some bows would shoot as well out to 90 yards as I could shoot at 30 with others.

    I have been surprised by some "low end" bows that flat outshot, in feel and accuracy, some that had twice the price tag. I'm still a little confused.

    When you find the answer, be sure to post it.
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  9. #9
    Repeatability, and comfort...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahunter55 View Post
    try the test & see all things being equal except the price of the bow.. I'm guessing it's the nut behind the Bow that makes the biggest difference..
    Quote Originally Posted by Fury90flier View Post
    can't tune a fire arm? not true at all. A bolt action rifle for example, barrel can be tightened to the proper torque- kink of like a variable tuning fork, action squared and trued, ammunition tuned to shoot at the proper node, stock mated to the action properly... These modifications would be done to make tighter shot to shot consistency.
    I was going to say both of those...

  11. #11
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    The sticker on the limb that says HOYT is what makes one bow more accurate than another!

  12. #12
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    It has more to do with the indian then the bow. As long as the bow is tuned and shooting properly..
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  13. #13
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    Ya for sure the shooter and grip...

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by braxton1127 View Post
    Ya for sure the shooter and grip...
    Grip, grip, grip. And also the grip.

    The geometry of a bow statistically makes a difference. The accuracy of the machining and the limb quality and limb matching makes a difference. Limb pocket design and tolerance are important. Not cam type but the individual design of the cam makes a difference, some are more shooting friendly than others and some have better nock travel.

    A bow will shoot as good as the arrows. Good quality, proper spined and consistently matched arrows will be noticeable in bow accuracy.

  15. #15
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    Putting a $500 hunting bow that's 32" long and a $1200 target bow that's 40" long in Hooter Shooters will yield similar results. But not when you put them in the hands of a human being.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buster of Xs View Post
    Putting a $500 hunting bow that's 32" long and a $1200 target bow that's 40" long in Hooter Shooters will yield similar results. But not when you put them in the hands of a human being.
    Right ,but will the Hooter Shooter fits into the blind lol.
    Funny thing is the the speed difference between the short 30-33 bows is not that big compared to their 36-38 inch cousins.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fury90flier View Post
    can't tune a fire arm? not true at all. A bolt action rifle for example, barrel can be tightened to the proper torque- kink of like a variable tuning fork, action squared and trued, ammunition tuned to shoot at the proper node, stock mated to the action properly... These modifications would be done to make tighter shot to shot consistency.
    I stated that you can't readily tune a firearm, but I didn't mean to infer that they can't be tuned at all. Yes, I understand gunsmithing modifications, can make a firearm more accurate, but these are not readily done, as bow tuning can be done without permanent modifications to the bow, unlike firearms. I suppose it's comparing apples to exploding oranges, and it's not the same. The process of a complete blueprinting, truing, and accurizing of a sniper rifle, is not comparable to anything that is ever done to tune a bow. That's what I meant. That would be like, tuning the torsional flex of a bow riser to the thousanth of an inch, by measuring the riser under load, and precisely removing metal from the riser to adjust. It's just not done.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by drdanke View Post
    I stated that you can't readily tune a firearm, but I didn't mean to infer that they can't be tuned at all. Yes, I understand gunsmithing modifications, can make a firearm more accurate, but these are not readily done, as bow tuning can be done without permanent modifications to the bow, unlike firearms. I suppose it's comparing apples to exploding oranges, and it's not the same. The process of a complete blueprinting, truing, and accurizing of a sniper rifle, is not comparable to anything that is ever done to tune a bow. That's what I meant. That would be like, tuning the torsional flex of a bow riser to the thousanth of an inch, by measuring the riser under load, and precisely removing metal from the riser to adjust. It's just not done.
    With bows you just need a very, very stiff riser (look at Hoyt Elite series risers). And you need ample leverage against shooter induced torque (this is brace height and a slim, well fitting grip). Then you need some stability to prevent swaying and canting (axle to axle length comes into play here). And you need a proper fit to the shooter's size so they can catch more anchor/reference points (again, axle to axle here). Plus having the ability to fine tune the nock travel to suit the individual shooter is a big plus (and this can only be done with dual or hybrid cams).

    Add all of these things together and you get a bow that's just easier to shoot well.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Belicoso View Post
    Right ,but will the Hooter Shooter fits into the blind lol.
    Funny thing is the the speed difference between the short 30-33 bows is not that big compared to their 36-38 inch cousins.
    It's fairly easy to get a 37/38 inch bow to hit 330 and still have about 7" of brace height. No need to skimp at all for 20fps.
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  20. #20
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    The Archer...

  21. #21
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    Guys, I totally agree that it's the archer that gives the bow it's accuracy. But even with the same archer not all bows shoot as well or as consistently over the course of many arrows. There are design elements that allow a bow to interact with it's shooter better.
    Sent via my 1918 Bell hand crank phone

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Buster of Xs View Post
    Guys, I totally agree that it's the archer that gives the bow it's accuracy. But even with the same archer not all bows shoot as well or as consistently over the course of many arrows. There are design elements that allow a bow to interact with it's shooter better.
    I agree, saying the archer is a give me. It's the universal answer. Some bows are more user friendly and designed better than others. Many factors add up and can seen on the target.

  23. #23
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    The person behind the bow.

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by drdanke View Post
    The inherent accuracy of a firearm, is dependant on the mechanical tolerances of the firearm components, as pertains to the barrel being in the same exact position during firing. When it comes to compound archery, what makes one bow inherantly more accurate than another. You cannot readily adjust the mechanical part of a firearm, to "tune" it and affect the accuracy. A bow, you can. What makes a competition bow, more accurate than a lower end (under $500) hunting bow, if both bows are perfectly tuned? Does the competition bow, simply have more "forgiveness" during the shot, to forgive shooter errors, built into the design of the bow? If a high end competition bow was mounted in a rest, and mechanically shot the same every time, and shoots in the same arrow hole every time, at 50 meters, can a lower end (under $500) hunting bow, be chucked into the same fixed rest, mechanically shot the same every time, and can it attain the same accuracy of the high end competition bow?


    Let's say we are talking a target pistol.
    You can add weight under the barrel to make the target pistol MORE front heavy or LESS front heavy.

    Then,
    we can get into custom grips, so the pistol just POINTS better.

    Then, we get into the trigger and customize over-travel, customize trigger weight.

    These tiny tweaks make the off-the-shelf pistol, into a finely tuned machine for a particular shooter...what works BEST for this ONE shooter.


    Sooooooooooooooooooo,
    one bow has a 17-degree narrow grip area on the riser...
    other bow has a 23-degree medium wide grip with rounded over, rectangular grip area on the riser...
    another bow has a 17-degree wooden wrap around grip..no edges to speak of...just kinda round all over

    some of these grips will get along with some shooters, and make shooting accurately...shooting more consistently..easier.
    some of these grips will not get along with some shooters...too wide...too narrow...too vertical...not vertical enough.

    sight windows.
    Some bows have very SHORT side windows.
    Some bows have very LONG side windows.

    Depending on how you anchor,
    depending on your draw length
    the sight window may be too short for some longer draw shooters.

    Cam design.
    Some bows, by design, have ZERO or near ZERO valley.
    Some bows, by design, have a LONG, SMOOTH valley and a mushier back wall.

    Some shooters will say a cam design is too harsh.
    Some shooters will say the same cam design is just right.

    Some cam draw stop designs work well with a hinge release.
    Some cam draw stop designs may not work as well for a hinge release.


    Some rifles work well for prone PALMA class shooting...with iron sights at 800 yards.
    Some rifles are bench rest queens and weigh 60 lbs for the rifle only.
    Some rifles are designed for Biatholon shooting (high precision 22lr).

    Sooooooooooooo,
    some bows are designed for shooting at football fields (FITA long range shooting...out to 100 yards (90 meters)).

    Soooooooooooo,
    some bows work specifically for inside a blind or up in a tree stand.

    A 60 lb benchrest rifle, prone on a mat, shooting iron sights at 800 yards,
    would not work so well.

    A Palma rifle, with no modifications, would not work so well on a benchrest (no sled) even with the 45X scope.


    Each "tool" has a special application...that makes things just a little MORE CONVENIENT,
    easier to use, in that application/environment.
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