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Thread: Aluminum vs Carbon arrows

  1. #1
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    Aluminum vs Carbon arrows

    What's your opinion of Aluminum compared to Carbon arrows. Faster, stronger, easier to work with?
    Thanks, Framemaker



  2. #2

    Re: Aluminum vs Carbon arrows

    Yup

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by framemaker View Post
    What's your opinion of Aluminum compared to Carbon arrows. Faster, stronger, easier to work with?
    Thanks, Framemaker

    That's pretty much it.

    Aluminum arrows was all we had back in the day. I'd like to have all the money I wasted on them.

    Every time you miss the target, bent arrow.

    Shoot a deer, bent arrow.

    If you shoot groups, it can bend your arrows.

    They will actually bend from just repeated shooting.

    Heck, they even bend from just lowering your bow down from a stand on a rope if your quiver is attached to your bow.

    When I made the switch to carbon arrows, I haven't looked back.

    As long as you flex a carbon arrow every time before you shoot, there is no problems.

    They don't bend. They are either broke or their not.

    Skeet.
    I cut my arrows twice and they're still too short.

    You cannot hit what you cannot see.

  4. #4
    Aluminum arrows
    Great tolerances and consistent spine
    Aluminum arrows have some of the best spec’s out there. The spine is more consistent than most carbon arrows at any price. The weight differs less per shat, etc.
    More choices (at least for now)
    You really could custom tune your setup better with aluminum arrows. The spine availability was much better than carbons. IMHO carbons are a”dumbed” down marketing tool. You went from a system that gave many choices to a system that has .400, .300, etc and is used over a much broader range. The bad news is you don’t have as many choices now….the good news is pro-shops and manufactures don’t have to make so many different arrows……which is nice for them. It really torques me to see .340/2315….it’s a sign for what’s in the future……less selection.
    Easier to build, cut, re-fletch
    If you build your own arrows you can cut them with a pipe cutter or any arrow saw. When re-fletching arrows they don’t nick like a carbon and you don’t have to use a wrap etc to get the vanes off.
    Easier to tune after being built i.e. heating and rotating inserts, etc
    If you “tune” each arrow….and you should…with the hot melt you can rotate the nock which can aid in broad head tuning. Some people use hot melt in carbons for this reason but they can come out….and using epoxy works well its permanent.
    Can change arrow length easier
    I buy new bows a lot. So if I can use the same arrows it saves me money. With aluminum I can just heat the insert and take it out and cut the arrows and reinstall the insert if they are too long. As you know even with the same draw length certain bow will take a shorter arrow. Too long, oh well but at least I have some options.
    Great Penetration
    Because aluminums are heavier than “most” carbons you get better penetration. Many folks “think” little carbons penetrate better because they sink into foam better because of the small diameter. But on a broad head tipped arrow it’s all about weight….if you don’t understand that you really need to do more research and I don’t want to get derailed here. No BS here a carbon of the same weight will penetrate as well…..possibly better if the spine is stiffer. But again most people that shoot carbons tend to shoot much lighter arrows.
    Pull from targets MUCH easier
    I mainly hunt these days so I shoot a lot of 3D targets. The aluminums pull so much eaiser than carbon. No soaps, slick stuff, pulling aids, etc and nothing to “stink” up my hunting arrows.

    Safety
    Aluminum arrows don’t crack and hide issues that can be dangerous. I don’t have to “bend” or inspect my arrows after each shot. Many carbon shooters do not do it either and well….that’s their choice. But either way checking them or not has its drawbacks. If an aluminum arrow bends slightly it will still shoot and won’t cause a safety issue…..if its bent bad enough to cause a safety issues it will be very visible.
    Versatile
    I still like to small game hunt and stump shoot. I can use older aluminum arrows for this. If they aren’t perfectly straight they will fly well enough and you can straighten them over and over with a jig. When they hit hard surfaces like rocks, trees, whatever, they don’t get cracks in them that are dangerous like a carbon. Plus since they are cheaper and can be straightened I can afford to use the arrows in this fashion. Carbons are either too expensive or too dangerous for this IMO. Great arrow for Judo tips.

    Better for game
    When you leave an arrow in an animal it can break. If an aluminum arrow breaks you pull out the broken piece and continue skinning the animal. If a carbon breaks you either cut around the break to make sure you don’t eat any carbon fibers or toss the shoulder etc…..either way it’s a hassle or a waste of meat.

    Price
    The cheapest arrow with the best spec’s you can find. Period.

    Toughness
    Aluminum arrows are tougher than people think. The reason folks “think” they are not is simple. As bow speed became an obsession with archers and companies gladly filled that trough to increase sales aluminum arrows had to get lighter to compete with the trend. So they went to thin walled fatter arrows to gain spine while decreasing weight. The end results were faster arrows BUT they were very easy to bend. These were the XX12 & XX13 series arrows. The XX14’s are “in between” in toughness but the XX15, 16, 17’s are tougher than folks think. The XX19’s are just under rebar….lol. I routinely shoot through game wash the blood off my arrow and change the blades. A quick spin test and verification shot and it’s back in my quiver.

    Conclusion
    Aluminum arrows do have many benefits over carbon. Myths that they bend easy and carbons are either straight or broke while wrong certainly help to add to the confusion. Many folks that bash aluminum have never even probably shot one but continue to parrot the myths as fact. When you really get down to it….it’s all about speed……and always has been. With a carbon you can now shoot an arrow that is spined correctly and light enough to damage or blow up your bow. With aluminum you could do that so I guess that sealed its fate for many archers. But if you want a great versatile arrow and can live with a bow that does everything but drop jaws at the local pro-shop chronograph……..you might be surprised what a aluminum can really offer given the chance.
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  5. #5
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    Very well put,Deadquiet,

  6. #6
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    You nailed it!

  7. #7

    Aluminum vs Carbon arrows

    I use alloys for spots. Full length 2613s with 260 grain pro points. Nothing flies as accurate or is as easy to pull from the target. Carbons are much faster though. Better for 3d ad field.
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  8. #8
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    you can't fix a broken carbon but if you bend your aluminum arrow, you can bend it back quite easily...though it will take a little practice
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  9. #9
    I've shot both and have thought about going back to aluminum, but then I remember all the bent arrows I've had to throw away and I decide to stick with carbon. I did shoot ACC's for a couple of years and think they are the best of both worlds, and have thought about going back to those.

  10. #10
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    Dead quiet, rite on the money, well said. I like my acc's but I also still shoot my xx78's.
    Shoot Straight.

  11. #11
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    Aluminum vs Carbon ---- i like Aluminum for spots and i use carbon for deer carbon penetrates better than aluminium because it flexes when hits something hard in turn you loose penatration , carbon don't flex when it hits bone and has smaller diameter less friction

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by deadquiet View Post
    Aluminum arrows
    Great tolerances and consistent spine
    Aluminum arrows have some of the best spec’s out there. The spine is more consistent than most carbon arrows at any price. The weight differs less per shat, etc.

    That only depends on what grade of carbon arrow you get. All of the upper priced carbon arrows has very tight tolerances.

    IMHO carbons are a”dumbed” down marketing tool. You went from a system that gave many choices to a system that has .400, .300, etc and is used over a much broader range. The bad news is you don’t have as many choices now.

    We still have lots of choices with carbons. Lots of people are fooled by the numbering process. Lets take a Radial X-Weave 300.... It's not a 300 spine at all. It's actually a .359 spine.

    Can change arrow length easier
    I buy new bows a lot. So if I can use the same arrows it saves me money. With aluminum I can just heat the insert and take it out and cut the arrows and reinstall the insert if they are too long. As you know even with the same draw length certain bow will take a shorter arrow. Too long, oh well but at least I have some options.
    Great Penetration

    I've been using the same carbon arrow lengths on a bunch of different bows, some with a lower DW, and they still were very accurate.

    Carbon arrows will out shoot most anyone
    .


    I mainly hunt these days so I shoot a lot of 3D targets. The aluminums pull so much eaiser than carbon. No soaps, slick stuff, pulling aids, etc and nothing to “stink” up my hunting arrows.


    Yep, and it's also easier to bend an aluminum arrow if they are not pulled out of the target straight.

    Aluminum arrows don’t crack and hide issues that can be dangerous. I don’t have to “bend” or inspect my arrows after each shot. Many carbon shooters do not do it either and well….that’s their choice. But either way checking them or not has its drawbacks. If an aluminum arrow bends slightly it will still shoot and won’t cause a safety issue…..if its bent bad enough to cause a safety issues it will be very visible.

    Wow, it takes all of about 3 seconds to flex a carbon arrow.

    Versatile
    I still like to small game hunt and stump shoot. I can use older aluminum arrows for this. If they aren’t perfectly straight they will fly well enough and you can straighten them over and over with a jig. When they hit hard surfaces like rocks, trees, whatever, they don’t get cracks in them that are dangerous like a carbon. Plus since they are cheaper and can be straightened I can afford to use the arrows in this fashion. Carbons are either too expensive or too dangerous for this IMO. Great arrow for Judo tips.

    Nope, aluminum arrows don't get cracks in them. But if you want to stump shoot, or miss and hit anything hard, you may as well kiss that arrow good bye.

    Better for game
    When you leave an arrow in an animal it can break. If an aluminum arrow breaks you pull out the broken piece and continue skinning the animal. If a carbon breaks you either cut around the break to make sure you don’t eat any carbon fibers or toss the shoulder etc…..either way it’s a hassle or a waste of meat.

    I've never, in all my years with carbons, and with all the critters I've killed, lost any meat due to carbon fibers. Every time an arrow goes through a critter, the meat is blood shot anyway. So cutting a little away is just part of it.


    Price
    The cheapest arrow with the best spec’s you can find. Period.

    You get what you pay for in arrows.

    Toughness
    Aluminum arrows are tougher than people think. The reason folks “think” they are not is simple. As bow speed became an obsession with archers and companies gladly filled that trough to increase sales aluminum arrows had to get lighter to compete with the trend. So they went to thin walled fatter arrows to gain spine while decreasing weight. The end results were faster arrows BUT they were very easy to bend. These were the XX12 & XX13 series arrows. The XX14’s are “in between” in toughness but the XX15, 16, 17’s are tougher than folks think. The XX19’s are just under rebar….lol. I routinely shoot through game wash the blood off my arrow and change the blades. A quick spin test and verification shot and it’s back in my quiver.

    Conclusion
    Aluminum arrows do have many benefits over carbon. Myths that they bend easy and carbons are either straight or broke while wrong certainly help to add to the confusion. Many folks that bash aluminum have never even probably shot one but continue to parrot the myths as fact. When you really get down to it….it’s all about speed……and always has been. With a carbon you can now shoot an arrow that is spined correctly and light enough to damage or blow up your bow. With aluminum you could do that so I guess that sealed its fate for many archers. But if you want a great versatile arrow and can live with a bow that does everything but drop jaws at the local pro-shop chronograph……..you might be surprised what a aluminum can really offer given the chance.
    As I have said, I shot aluminum arrows for years and years. I cannot see one real life benefit of using them over a good carbon arrow.

    IMO your one that's really reaching. If you or anyone else thinks for one second that an aluminum arrow is as durable as a carbon arrow, then your sadly mistaken and refuse to believe the facts. Much like a feather compared to a plastic vane. I've used them all [carbons, aluminum, feathers, plastic]and I do keep an open mind and tell it like it really is, not how I would like it to be.
    I cut my arrows twice and they're still too short.

    You cannot hit what you cannot see.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Skeeter 58 View Post
    As I have said, I shot aluminum arrows for years and years. I cannot see one real life benefit of using them over a good carbon arrow.

    IMO your one that's really reaching. If you or anyone else thinks for one second that an aluminum arrow is as durable as a carbon arrow, then your sadly mistaken and refuse to believe the facts. Much like a feather compared to a plastic vane. I've used them all [carbons, aluminum, feathers, plastic]and I do keep an open mind and tell it like it really is, not how I would like it to be.
    Skeeter......like you have over 3 decades of shooting bows. I have shot carbon many times over that period. The "facts" are in hunting situations I have broken as many carbon arrows as I have aluminum....if not more. I admit IF you group shoot targets all the time or compete in 3D carbons hold up better. Carbons also hold up better than the thin walled aluminums that everyone switched to in order to gain speed.....like the XX12, & 13. Probably also your arrow of choice by you above statement.

    All I can tell you is I have pulled countless XX2315, & 2216's out of the dirt, washed off the blood and they were perfectly straight. I have practiced with aluminum on 3D courses messing around with friends and launched them through the woods.....and "sometimes" even those were still straight. Look I'm not saying they are as tough as the toughest carbons........but since you know carbon so well......not all carbons are equal either.......so lumping them together shows a little bias IMO.

    What I have seen with carbon in hunting situations is usually cracks at the tip around the insert or splintered and broken arrows in the deer when they are recovered. I can't tell you if they break on impact or break as a result of being in the deer as if flee but the end result is they do break as well.

    So you can SAY I’m reaching and act as if I trying to mislead or lie to folks but these are the things I have seen over the last 30 years of bowhunting weather you believe it or not. Granted carbons arrows are still making advances but IMO if you like a heavy hunting arrow the advantage over aluminum isn’t what you folks try to claim but over light hunting arrows….well that’s different.

    Since the trend now (and especially here on AT) is that folks jump right down to 5 grains to hunt with…..well then your statement does carry some weight. A 350 grain carbon arrow IS tougher than any lightweight aluminum will ever be and THAT’s why folks don’t use aluminum it slows their bows down too much.

    That however starts a whole other issue…..that I’m sure we won’t agree on either……lol.
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  14. #14
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    I like aluminums...just my personal preference. Shot carbons for awhile...but like the look of the big ol aluminums and the weight. I am not concerned about speed...so aluminums work great for me. Not to mention they hit like a mack truck.

  15. #15
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    I shot aluminum for decades and there is no way I will ever shoot them again, I wasn't a competitive shooter back then but the maintenance on a aluminum arrow is kind of like wife maintenance. It never stops. Carbon is simple, they stay the same until you break them and if you choose gold tip you don't break them very often.

  16. #16
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    I go ACC and have for 15 years, great balance and tough.
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  17. #17
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    I'm an alum fan--always have been. Shot a few carbons and didn't like the increased bow noise. Read too many threads and have seen too many pics of carbons through hands/fingers so I'll stick with the XX75s. As far as bending--that's why I have an arrow straightener--and I'm not a spot shooter or pure target archer so I've never noticed any appreciable decrease in accuracy from bent shafts. I have noticed the improved penetration and quieter bow from them however.

  18. #18
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    I shoot both...actually all 3. Aluminums for indoor. All carbon for 3-D and aluminum / carbon for Field and hunting. I agree with deadquiet about the advantages of aluminum generally, which is why the Field and hunting arrows have it in them. The only reason I shoot all carbons for 3-D is because the 12 walls of aluminums were not the greatest in the durability department.
    There's not much of a lesson to be learned the second time a calf kicks you in the balz.

  19. #19

    Re: Aluminum vs Carbon arrows

    I can go up in spine and add weight to the front of my gold tips to increase weight and break down the spine and make them just as slow and heavy as an aluminum arrow. They however will have a better foc and thinner shaft for better wind drift and increased penetration. They will also be every bit as quiet.

    Sure going ibo or 5 grains with aluminum or carbon with any bow will leave you with a weak or easily broken arrow.

    Ive also seen a guy shoot a carbon arrows with a 1" aluminium collar glued to the front of his arrow shoot a 1" steel plate at 30 yards and do it over and over. Id like to see any aluminum arrow do that more than once.

    I can shoot multiple arrows at the same dot in field shoots or 3d shoots and replace a nock once in a while. You cant do this with aluminum. You will end up replacing the whole arrow. I also dont have to have worry about someone bending my arrows pulling them out of the target.





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  20. #20
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    Carbon arrows came about due to a desire for more arrow speed. That continues to sell most carbon arrows today although we are seeing more and more heavy carbons being marketed to hunters. I suspect that the vast majority of guys buying carbons do so because they view them as the "normal' arrow but can't tell you why. Much the same as why plastic vanes are so popular.
    Aluminums come in a couple of grades. The cheaper arrows have a softer alloy which is not as durable as the XX78/SuperSlams/X7s. I have found aluminum easier to broadhead tune. They also come in a much broader selection so far as spine and weight. However, the aluminum will always weight more than a carbon of the same spine. Sometimes that is a good thing depending upon your application.
    Given the benefits of both, I am surprised more shooters are not using the FMJs or ACCs.
    There is no perfect arrow. All have limitations. All of them break and bend. If you do a further topic search on here you will find posts were some will sing the praises of a certain arrow while others will tell you of its many faults.
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  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by deadquiet View Post
    Aluminum arrows
    Great tolerances and consistent spine
    Aluminum arrows have some of the best spec’s out there. The spine is more consistent than most carbon arrows at any price. The weight differs less per shat, etc.
    More choices (at least for now)
    You really could custom tune your setup better with aluminum arrows. The spine availability was much better than carbons. IMHO carbons are a”dumbed” down marketing tool. You went from a system that gave many choices to a system that has .400, .300, etc and is used over a much broader range. The bad news is you don’t have as many choices now….the good news is pro-shops and manufactures don’t have to make so many different arrows……which is nice for them. It really torques me to see .340/2315….it’s a sign for what’s in the future……less selection.
    Easier to build, cut, re-fletch
    If you build your own arrows you can cut them with a pipe cutter or any arrow saw. When re-fletching arrows they don’t nick like a carbon and you don’t have to use a wrap etc to get the vanes off.
    Easier to tune after being built i.e. heating and rotating inserts, etc
    If you “tune” each arrow….and you should…with the hot melt you can rotate the nock which can aid in broad head tuning. Some people use hot melt in carbons for this reason but they can come out….and using epoxy works well its permanent.
    Can change arrow length easier
    I buy new bows a lot. So if I can use the same arrows it saves me money. With aluminum I can just heat the insert and take it out and cut the arrows and reinstall the insert if they are too long. As you know even with the same draw length certain bow will take a shorter arrow. Too long, oh well but at least I have some options.
    Great Penetration
    Because aluminums are heavier than “most” carbons you get better penetration. Many folks “think” little carbons penetrate better because they sink into foam better because of the small diameter. But on a broad head tipped arrow it’s all about weight….if you don’t understand that you really need to do more research and I don’t want to get derailed here. No BS here a carbon of the same weight will penetrate as well…..possibly better if the spine is stiffer. But again most people that shoot carbons tend to shoot much lighter arrows.
    Pull from targets MUCH easier
    I mainly hunt these days so I shoot a lot of 3D targets. The aluminums pull so much eaiser than carbon. No soaps, slick stuff, pulling aids, etc and nothing to “stink” up my hunting arrows.

    Safety
    Aluminum arrows don’t crack and hide issues that can be dangerous. I don’t have to “bend” or inspect my arrows after each shot. Many carbon shooters do not do it either and well….that’s their choice. But either way checking them or not has its drawbacks. If an aluminum arrow bends slightly it will still shoot and won’t cause a safety issue…..if its bent bad enough to cause a safety issues it will be very visible.
    Versatile
    I still like to small game hunt and stump shoot. I can use older aluminum arrows for this. If they aren’t perfectly straight they will fly well enough and you can straighten them over and over with a jig. When they hit hard surfaces like rocks, trees, whatever, they don’t get cracks in them that are dangerous like a carbon. Plus since they are cheaper and can be straightened I can afford to use the arrows in this fashion. Carbons are either too expensive or too dangerous for this IMO. Great arrow for Judo tips.

    Better for game
    When you leave an arrow in an animal it can break. If an aluminum arrow breaks you pull out the broken piece and continue skinning the animal. If a carbon breaks you either cut around the break to make sure you don’t eat any carbon fibers or toss the shoulder etc…..either way it’s a hassle or a waste of meat.

    Price
    The cheapest arrow with the best spec’s you can find. Period.

    Toughness
    Aluminum arrows are tougher than people think. The reason folks “think” they are not is simple. As bow speed became an obsession with archers and companies gladly filled that trough to increase sales aluminum arrows had to get lighter to compete with the trend. So they went to thin walled fatter arrows to gain spine while decreasing weight. The end results were faster arrows BUT they were very easy to bend. These were the XX12 & XX13 series arrows. The XX14’s are “in between” in toughness but the XX15, 16, 17’s are tougher than folks think. The XX19’s are just under rebar….lol. I routinely shoot through game wash the blood off my arrow and change the blades. A quick spin test and verification shot and it’s back in my quiver.

    Conclusion
    Aluminum arrows do have many benefits over carbon. Myths that they bend easy and carbons are either straight or broke while wrong certainly help to add to the confusion. Many folks that bash aluminum have never even probably shot one but continue to parrot the myths as fact. When you really get down to it….it’s all about speed……and always has been. With a carbon you can now shoot an arrow that is spined correctly and light enough to damage or blow up your bow. With aluminum you could do that so I guess that sealed its fate for many archers. But if you want a great versatile arrow and can live with a bow that does everything but drop jaws at the local pro-shop chronograph……..you might be surprised what a aluminum can really offer given the chance.
    I have to say, this guy knows his arrows!!!!! I couldn't have said it any better, it is kinda like who cares about all the benefits, if some guy needs speed the really light ones aren't the answer. But since I am a hunter, I have the finest arrows in the world = XX78 I have strayed to the plastic world and will never make that mistake again! I think the two top professional hunters in the world, Dwight Schul and Chuck Adams, have and always will use Easton Aluminum Arrows, and so do I! The finest arrow made with no equal = XX78 Super Slam's Over thirty years of bowhunting and 50 chasing game, I have tried carbon and proven they are not as good for hunting, the bigger the game the better aluminum get's, for target archers except 3-D, most shoot aluminum also, but pin point accuracy is all the worry about. good writ Deadquiet! well put!
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by deadquiet View Post
    Skeeter......like you have over 3 decades of shooting bows. I have shot carbon many times over that period. The "facts" are in hunting situations I have broken as many carbon arrows as I have aluminum....if not more. I admit IF you group shoot targets all the time or compete in 3D carbons hold up better. Carbons also hold up better than the thin walled aluminums that everyone switched to in order to gain speed.....like the XX12, & 13. Probably also your arrow of choice by you above statement.

    All I can tell you is I have pulled countless XX2315, & 2216's out of the dirt, washed off the blood and they were perfectly straight. I have practiced with aluminum on 3D courses messing around with friends and launched them through the woods.....and "sometimes" even those were still straight. Look I'm not saying they are as tough as the toughest carbons........but since you know carbon so well......not all carbons are equal either.......so lumping them together shows a little bias IMO.

    What I have seen with carbon in hunting situations is usually cracks at the tip around the insert or splintered and broken arrows in the deer when they are recovered. I can't tell you if they break on impact or break as a result of being in the deer as if flee but the end result is they do break as well.

    So you can SAY I’m reaching and act as if I trying to mislead or lie to folks but these are the things I have seen over the last 30 years of bowhunting weather you believe it or not. Granted carbons arrows are still making advances but IMO if you like a heavy hunting arrow the advantage over aluminum isn’t what you folks try to claim but over light hunting arrows….well that’s different.

    Since the trend now (and especially here on AT) is that folks jump right down to 5 grains to hunt with…..well then your statement does carry some weight. A 350 grain carbon arrow IS tougher than any lightweight aluminum will ever be and THAT’s why folks don’t use aluminum it slows their bows down too much.

    That however starts a whole other issue…..that I’m sure we won’t agree on either……lol.
    I will not disagree with you on some of that. But the fact remains that an aluminum arrow still bends. Even the heavier alloy arrows I used to shoot.

    Lets take this for one example. My very last allow arrows I shot, they were shot into a 18/1 bock target. The target was setting up on top of something [don't remember what now] and there were several arrows in the target. When I shot one more, the target fell forward right on the nocks. Well when I hurriedly ran up there and pulled the arrows, I had just ruined a couple of them as they were bent to badly to bend back.

    I had the same thing happen a couple of times with carbons and all I had to do was pull the arrows out, clean out the dirt from the nocks, and ready to shoot them many times over.

    Speed........I'm no speed freak but I do like my arrows to weigh ~412 grains for my 60# bows. That seems to be a good trade off for me and my style of shooting/hunting.

    So in order to maintain what I'm looking for, an allow arrow would have to be pretty light walled.....bend even easier yet.

    But it's all about what one likes. As for me, it's all carbon.

    Skeet.
    I cut my arrows twice and they're still too short.

    You cannot hit what you cannot see.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    23
    Not one word about wooden shafts? What did the indians use?

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    ADAMS,PIKE COUNTY ILL.
    Posts
    280
    Quote Originally Posted by wildcatter109 View Post
    I have to say, this guy knows his arrows!!!!! I couldn't have said it any better, it is kinda like who cares about all the benefits, if some guy needs speed the really light ones aren't the answer. But since I am a hunter, I have the finest arrows in the world = XX78 I have strayed to the plastic world and will never make that mistake again! I think the two top professional hunters in the world, Dwight Schul and Chuck Adams, have and always will use Easton Aluminum Arrows, and so do I! The finest arrow made with no equal = XX78 Super Slam's Over thirty years of bowhunting and 50 chasing game, I have tried carbon and proven they are not as good for hunting, the bigger the game the better aluminum get's, for target archers except 3-D, most shoot aluminum also, but pin point accuracy is all the worry about. good writ Deadquiet! well put!


    I totally agree with deadquiet & wildcatter109. I have shot many carbons in my time,but it all goes back to what one considers dependable,in each persons situation. Thats why i will always hunt with my years proven XX78. If carbon arrows are so great,why are there arrows made with a aluminum core?A properly tuned bow is key along with shot placement.A arrow of aluminum or carbon,is then a personal choice.

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    6,060

    Aluminum vs Carbon arrows

    I have thought about going back to aluminum, but decided to go hybrid. I think the ACC blends the best of both worlds with the aluminum core, and consistency, but adds durability to the mix. Not to mention I can still build a heavy arrow. I also prefer a smaller diameter arrow.


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