Difference between expensive and cheaper recurves?

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  1. #1
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    Difference between expensive and cheaper recurves?

    Please pardon if this is a question that's been asked repeatedly, but I can't find anything. I have a Samick Sage recurve but was curious what the difference is with this vs the Olympic or competition recurves I've seen. I'm guessing a lot has to do with the materials used, but why is so-and-so better than whatchamacallit?

    I know, this is a fairly generic question but I'm just curious what makes one bow more accurate (better?) than another...

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  3. #2
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    I bought the SF Axiom and compared to expensive "expert" bows I can tell no difference. It shoots amazing and the limbs were $80 and the riser $90. So of course there is a difference but not as big as some people say.
    I REFUSE TO SHOOT ANYTHING BESIDES WIN&WIN.

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  5. #3
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    The sammicks are great beginner bows, they shoot well for the $$$. In all honesty what you will see with the more expensive bows is bells and whistles....Better wood choices, custom risers, etc....Also you have the option of getting an ILF setup where you can get limbs from many different sources.

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  7. #4
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    accuraccy is mostly the shooter not the bow. A expert shooting a samick sage could do very well. Some people like fancy an pretty bows. But for most people a low to med cost bow is all you will need. An some people like to try out different bows you see a lot of expensive for sale. Also usally longer an heavier weight bows not poundage are easier to shoot.

  8. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by BowmanJay View Post
    The sammicks are great beginner bows, they shoot well for the $$$. In all honesty what you will see with the more expensive bows is bells and whistles....Better wood choices, custom risers, etc....Also you have the option of getting an ILF setup where you can get limbs from many different sources.
    I agree with this.

    I'm a confirmed custom recurve junkie and having owned many, there can be differences in cast and vibration, aside from the aesthetic value of the premier bows. I have had and still have a bow that is the "holy grail" to some and it really is not that great a performer compared to my other bows. I keep it mainly because it's a classic.

    From a flat out performance standpoint I don't think you have to spend a lot to get a lot. Look at how many great reviews you read on the Sage or Hoyt Excel. Kegan puts out a bow that outperforms just about anything in it's class from what I've read, and at a very reasonable cost.

    When you look at the expensive bows, it's mostly frosting. I will say that my prettiest bows are also my best performing bows in terms of speed and lack of vibration. Only you can decide if you like a lot of frosting. I know I do...

  9. #6
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    Re: Difference between expensive and cheaper recurves?

    Nothing but name brands. I shoot a black widow, just because I want to. I shoot it very well, but I have also shot some samick bows just as well.



    Sent from my LS670 using Tapatalk 2

  10. #7
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    I guess it comes down to what I can afford, but it must feel natural in my hand, how I shoot it, and then looks, I've had to wipe my eyes, & put many bows back on the rack after looking at the price. But when I win the lotto, & throw away my crying towel, all them custom bow makers will be working some long hours for sure, LOL

  11. #8
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    Re: Difference between expensive and cheaper recurves?

    Let me add this.....

    (BTW, I plan on starting a thread called "I have the perfect bow" later when I have time. Make sure to check it out"

    But, what I want to tell you now is this. Get a bow that you are a little attracted to, and that you know performs decently(cast, vibration, etc)

    Then, put everything you got into it. I have learned over the last several years that when I commit to ONE bow, shoot it exclusively and learn how the bow likes to be shot, I can shoot darn good with anything.

    Get what you can afford, then quit shopping, browsing classifieds, and reading any threads that compare bows or that would tell you something issue better.

    Form, consistency, and confidence will outshoot any bow!

    Sent from my LS670 using Tapatalk 2

  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by vulcan12 View Post
    Let me add this.....

    (BTW, I plan on starting a thread called "I have the perfect bow" later when I have time. Make sure to check it out"

    But, what I want to tell you now is this. Get a bow that you are a little attracted to, and that you know performs decently(cast, vibration, etc)

    Then, put everything you got into it. I have learned over the last several years that when I commit to ONE bow, shoot it exclusively and learn how the bow likes to be shot, I can shoot darn good with anything.

    Get what you can afford, then quit shopping, browsing classifieds, and reading any threads that compare bows or that would tell you something issue better.

    Form, consistency, and confidence will outshoot any bow!

    Sent from my LS670 using Tapatalk 2
    Well said. I went through the "I want one of everything!" until I found the one that works the best for me....and it was less than $250 delivered. A couple of hi-dollar bows were sent packing when I finally realized that cost isn't the tell-all and rack decoration doesn't put any meat in the freezer.
    "If you find yourself in a fair fight....your tactics suck!"

  13. #10
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    The Sage will shoot better than most of us archers ever will. I've been down the expensive bow route...not knockin expensive bows if that's what one prefers but I've found that the Sage shoots better than a lot of custom wood riser bows I've owned..and I've owned a lot of em.

  14. #11
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    Sweet!

    So basically it comes down to skill and, if you choose to go that route, accessories? I was thinking, once I started to get better with the bare bow, I'd get a set of sights and maybe a stabilizer, but that's a ways down the road.

    Everything I've read about the Sage says that it's a great bow so I'm excited. I'd hate to have to keep buying new bows, I'd rather spend my money on good accessories that could, if I need to, move those to another bow if/when I grow out of this one.

    Seems that might not be a problem. Works great for me!!

  15. #12
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    Difference between expensive and cheaper recurves?

    High dollar target bows will shoot with much less vibration, and matched limbs will be more consistent for Brady Ellison, not so much for us

  16. #13
    The difference between expensive and so called cheap bows is just a status symbol in my opinion. I can shoot the cheapest bow you can find and hit the target just as well as I can with a 1200 dollar custom built beauty. That is right the custom bows are a looker while they still do not shoot any better than a 150 dollar bow. It is all in what you can afford and your desires. It does not upset me to scratch a 150 dollar bow but let me scratch a 1200 Cadillac and I would cry. Also if you got caught in the rain with a very expensive bow you would be having a panic attack to get to the truck and forget the hunt. Decide what you want in a bow and your use of the tool then decide what you can stand to loose if things turn sour as they sometimes do while hunting such as dropping the bow, rain storm, snow storm etc. make your choice and don't look back or second guess your choice. I hunt with a board bow , cane arrows with flint tips all made by me and I have about 30 bucks tied up in it and enjoy it as much as the fellow shooting a black widow or big jim bow. It is all in what you perceive as enjoyment, as that is what all of us are chasing and disguise it as hunting. My set up will take down a hog or deer the same as an expensive set up.

  17. #14
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    Check out Jimmy B's video of him shooting the samick long bow. He sure makes those low dollar bows look good LOL. It is just a matter of what you want to spend. They will all look great in the right hands.
    <+><

  18. #15
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    The bows in the olympics are very long and heavy compared to the Sage. (Samick has made lots of olympic winners too.)

    As people have said, "it's the shooter, not the bow", but different bows are better at different things. So there's lots of choices out there.

    A precision machined aluminum riser with various stainless steel threaded inserts weighing 3 or 4 pounds with a 30" stabilizer rod will not help you shooting at carp in two feet of water. And a thirty-year old $50 cragslist bow with a few scuffs but shoots great (AND floats!) will not be much good at targets 70 meters away.

    Shoot 'em all, I say. I wish I could stick with one sometimes, but which one?

  19. #16
    I find a huge difference between inexpensive and expensive bows, though not always what may be expected (or hoped for). There can be a sublime elegance in the work of an expert bowyer that presents great pleasure to the archer - though not necessarily for specific practical, quantifiable reasons. We interact with our equipment physically and mentally and form a bond with our tools. I enjoy all my bows, but some have an essence that is indescribably wondrous. And, unfortunately for my purse, steeper money has indeed bought some magnificent-feeling shooters. The loose of the beholder is the ultimate bottom line with any bow.

  20. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by ladyeclectic View Post
    Please pardon if this is a question that's been asked repeatedly, but I can't find anything. I have a Samick Sage recurve but was curious what the difference is with this vs the Olympic or competition recurves I've seen. I'm guessing a lot has to do with the materials used, but why is so-and-so better than whatchamacallit?

    I know, this is a fairly generic question but I'm just curious what makes one bow more accurate (better?) than another...
    There is a difference in tunability in an Olympic recurve and a Samick Sage, most Olympic recurves are usually also longer, commonly 66 - 70 inches depending on the riser size and limbs, which will affect how they feel on your fingers and draw.

    An Olympic ILF bow is also a very flexible platform as you can use many different brand limbs, sizes, quality and weight.

    Most ILF bows will also have more options for accessories, whether they be clicker plates, various stabilizer fittings, etc. Riser material and design should also make a difference in the feel or how snappy a bow feels.

    Like Arrowwood already mentioned though, it depends on how you're going to use it. I thought the bowfishing example vs shooting 70 meters was perfect.

    For myself, I've found the ILF platform hard to beat in flexibility.

  21. #18
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    would a cheap bow keep up with this:
    44.0# at 30" or 7.3 gpp, 7 5/8" brace height with 124 grain 18 strand string: 215.2fps from a 70"bow.
    Not only that they can drop arrows in targets to win tournaments, so fast is not always a miss...
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  22. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thin Man View Post
    I find a huge difference between inexpensive and expensive bows, though not always what may be expected (or hoped for). There can be a sublime elegance in the work of an expert bowyer that presents great pleasure to the archer - though not necessarily for specific practical, quantifiable reasons. We interact with our equipment physically and mentally and form a bond with our tools. I enjoy all my bows, but some have an essence that is indescribably wondrous. And, unfortunately for my purse, steeper money has indeed bought some magnificent-feeling shooters. The loose of the beholder is the ultimate bottom line with any bow.
    Yes! A metaphysical perspective on Archery Talk...I love it. Adornment is meaningless to some, an unadulterated pleasure for others.

    I really enjoy a beautiful custom bow, rifle, or shotgun that has been used and lovingly taken care of over the years, complete with all the little scars and reminders of places its been. No safe queens for me, like you said they're tools first.

  23. #20
    My experience is this....most of the accuracy humanly achievable is primarily the archer...BUT...equipment choices can definitely improve an archer's accuracy.

    There's a reason why there are different classes in competition for equipment choice.

    Some equipment choices can do more to help an archer's accuracy than others.

    I use to strictly shoot Black Widow bows off the shelf for hunting, competition and shooting demos...until David Sosa of DAS bows sent me a prototype of his bow to try out.

    At first I didn't think much of the DAS with it's metal riser and design. I wasn't the least bit drawn to these type of bows...UNTIL...I shot it. I immediately knew I had something special in my hands that I had never experienced before at that level.

    My Black Widow has found a spot in my closet while I know strictly shoot my DAS for everything. My scores increased by about 5%...which may not be much to some people but it opened my eyes.

    I personally believe it was a combination of things that helped improve my score such as using an elevated rest and cushion plunger, metal riser and Olympic grade limbs.

    So...Yes...equipment can make a difference but it can and will vary from person to person. The key is to find out what works best for your goals, personality and abilities as an archer.

    Ray

  24. #21
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    Often expensive vs inexpensive is measured in the production process, i.e. custom hand built vs mass produced assembly line. Sometimes the brand itself increases cost (Harley Davidson is a perfect example) In the end, Ray summs it up well in his last line above.

  25. #22
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    Just joined and truly enjoy reading all the suggestions, insights and whatnot.

    A bit of background, at the suggestion of the local shop, (proprietess is an ex-olympic coach), in late May and at her suggestion bought a Samick "Polaris" set-up with 35lb limbs, truth, I don't know my draw length at this time (i'm 5'6" male), I will ask. Later, Added an inexpensive sight and a kisser button, again, at her suggestion.

    As a rank beginner, I am enjoying this bow, using it in the local 20 yard league (18 meter), last two scores were 236 and 231 (yeah, I dropped 5 points) after starting at 200 in the first meet. That all being said, seems Samick's "Sage" riser is discussed frequently as a beginner bow (riser), how does it compare with the Polaris riser for a beginner? Any real difference performance wise, other than a few dollars cost? I guess I'm already hooked somewhat.

    Oh, and thank all of you for a very informative discussion group.

  26. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BLACK WOLF View Post
    At first I didn't think much of the DAS with it's metal riser and design. I wasn't the least bit drawn to these type of bows...UNTIL...I shot it. I immediately knew I had something special in my hands that I had never experienced before at that level.
    Like Ray, I was a die-hard Widow shooter. Wanted to try something different so I sold the Widow's and got into a Shafer Silvertip kick. Great shooting bows but still wanted to try something else. So I got into vintage bows and really liked that(still do,BTW).

    But earlier this year I picked up an ILF bow...TT Pinnacle riser w/recurve limbs and knew the possibilities right away. So after 8 months I now have 4 ILF risers and 4 sets of limbs. My latest is a TT Titan riser with Kaya carbon foam limbs. This bow shoots lights out!!! It's the most accurate shooting bow I've ever owned, or shot for that matter.

    I still string up the old Grizzly or an old Shakespeare and enjoy shooting them and if the right Widow came up, I'd probably jump on it. But right now, when I feel like shooting I usually string up one of my ILF bows

  27. #24
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    Dano, that's good shooting, you're off to a great start.

    The Polaris has different length possibilities, white limbs, and lower weights (13 - 40#). The Sage has limb weights 25-60#, 62" length only, and black limbs.

    You could generalize that the Sage is more of a hunting bow and the Polaris is geared toward target shooting, but I doubt there's much difference in performance.

  28. #25
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    Cool...I won't worry about upgrading at this point with the Polaris. Arrowwood, thanks for the (to me) relief to know that i will be able to compete for some time to come.

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