Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Tips on Field Dressing Oryx

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    FatFort, NM
    Posts
    57

    Tips on Field Dressing Oryx

    I'm heading out on my first attempt at bagging an oryx next month. Has anyone among us harvested one and field dressed it? I've dealt with antelope and deer before, but never an oryx. From what I've read, their biology is a little different, so I'm asking before I get in the field and encounter any problems. I appreciate any tips/reassurances.

    God Bless Wyoming and Keep It Wild


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Long Island,NY
    Posts
    1,703
    Just play dumb and let your guide do it all.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    FatFort, NM
    Posts
    57
    So nobody here has ever dressed out an oryx?

    ArcherySnob, that one sentence made your username make perfect sense.
    God Bless Wyoming and Keep It Wild

  4. #4
    Guessing since they a fairly large like Elk you need the same type utensils to do the job. Knife, hack saw, small hand ax & pack frame, game bag/cloth for quarters if your on your own.If you have a guide, i'm sure he'll know the routine & if not, you went with the wrong guide. Good Luck..
    Always Thankful

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    FatFort, NM
    Posts
    57
    Thanks, dude, I appreciate the input!

    I'm all set for tools and all, but not going guided. I know where they're at (it's just under 2 hours from my house) and I know how I'm going about it; just thinking of contingencies. I'm sure I could deal with something should it come up, but I'd rather go in knowing if there are any gotchas from someone who's done it before.
    God Bless Wyoming and Keep It Wild

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    271

    Tips on Field Dressing Oryx

    Google it

  7. #7
    I've done a few. If you can handle an elk you can handle an Oryx. They are actually a little smaller than an elk. At the end of they day they are a ruminant animal just like a deer or elk. Take your time, if you have gutted even a whitetail things will look familiar. The intestines are at the back then the stomachs, then the diaphragm, then lungs and heart. Having some help holding legs is always nice so bring a buddy or two. Just like with elk get that esophagus out or you will lose the neck meat and potential the cape. Good luck and put up some pictures when you get back. pm me if you run in to trouble, I have a brother in Cruces that has done a few as well.

  8. #8
    Carry a knife sharpener and use it often! I found my NM Orix to be tougher on cutlery than any native North American critter I've dealt with.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    6,330
    Not being a smart **, but how much different can it be? Get the belly open and empty it out. I've never done it, but common sense tells me it can't be that much different. Good luck on your hunt

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    6,749
    I've never done it, but I think they have all the same organs on the inside that you need to get on the outside as any other mammal.
    My other bow is a Marlin 1895G 45-70 Gov't open sights
    Quote Originally Posted by ohiobooners View Post
    In all seriousness I do hope ppl understand that a deer is not worth losing your dignity over.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    FatFort, NM
    Posts
    57
    Thanks for the help and advice. Again, I'm not just asking for giggles, I'm just a meticulous planner when it comes to hunting - I want to have as much knowledge and as much control over variables as I can before I step foot into the field. Oryx are different critters: don't need to drink water, have huge stomachs, vital area pretty well covered by the front shoulder. There are significant differences and had I just treated this hunt like any other deer or elk outing then I really wouldn't have to worry much about gutting anything. So, I'm getting as knowledgable as I can about it before I'm in the field and find out that I should have probably brought more rope to keep the legs apart (Thank you, lsb!), because I never had the need to do that with a muley or an antelope. I'm also now going to pack a sharpener that I wouldn't have before BTM suggested it.
    God Bless Wyoming and Keep It Wild

  12. #12
    Don't know anything about field dressing them, but we hunted them when we went to South Africa in June. The guide told us in order to make a heart shot, we needed to aim about an inch above the elbow if the oryx is standing broadside. I'm guessing the oryx you are hunting is similar? Our guide said if you aim like you would on a whitetail, you will get nothing but guts. Straight up from the leg was perfect shot placement. But I'm sure you knew that. Good luck on your hunt!
    Electric Pink Mathews Jewel 50lbs, 25"

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    6,330
    Quote Originally Posted by tsaxybabe View Post
    Don't know anything about field dressing them, but we hunted them when we went to South Africa in June. The guide told us in order to make a heart shot, we needed to aim about an inch above the elbow if the oryx is standing broadside. I'm guessing the oryx you are hunting is similar? Our guide said if you aim like you would on a whitetail, you will get nothing but guts. Straight up from the leg was perfect shot placement. But I'm sure you knew that. Good luck on your hunt!
    Is that to mean the guts on an Oryx is that far forward?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    IL
    Posts
    6,330
    I just looked up a shot placement pic for the Oryx - definitely further forward and quit a bit smaller in comparison. I would copy and paste the pic, but I'm not that smart...

  15. #15
    I have no idea, but sounds cool as heck. How hard was tag to get?
    sine labore nihil

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    FatFort, NM
    Posts
    57
    Yeah, the vital region actually favors a quartering away shot so that you avoid the scapula, but can be done on a straight broadside shot. Most down here hunt them with rifles because they act like goats - hiding in plain sight dependent upon superior eyesight. I'm hiking in early and setting up overnight up in the mountains. They perceive threat from below them and all but ignore what's above them, so I'm banking on pressure from below driving them to me. Tsaxybabe, thanks a lot for the relative alignment tip, it is much appreciated. I'm fairly certain that they're the same species, scimitar-horned, but from what I've read, there are 2-3 other species of oryx in Africa that are nearly extinct up north. They do really well here in NM and have pretty much driven out the deer population in White Sands, so NMG&F issues around 2,000 tags a year to try and keep them under control.

    I'm getting pretty pumped to head out - doing some scouting and water delivery this week. Skynight - There is a delineation between types of hunts for oryx you can do down here: Once-In-A-Lifetime, which seems self-explanatory, but isn't because you can draw for a different non-OIAL tag, too. I'm not sure how that part works, but I didn't get that type of tag. I really just lucked into it because I recently separated from the military, got a job down here and ran into a buddy of mine who drew the tag but is in the middle of surgeries. He was able to transfer the tag to me and get me set up with his plan, so I'm doubly lucky and owe him big time. For out-of-state tags, your best bet is to try and draw an outfitted hunt (NM only allocates 10% of the tags to out-of-state and, of that, 60% are set aside for outfitted hunts).

    Like I said prior, I'm still studying as much as possible so if anyone else has tips/techniques/strategy or any other "The More You Know" type input, I'm all ears!

    Thanks again, everyone, I appreciate the help!!
    God Bless Wyoming and Keep It Wild

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Illinois/New Mexico
    Posts
    11,998
    Do it without gutting it, like elk.

  18. #18
    Yep, their guts are very far forward compared to a whitetail! I have a book that shows shot placement in all African species and you don't have to worry too much about the shoulder blade because most African animals have weird (to us) bone structure, as well. What would be a shoulder hit on a whitetail is a good hit on most African plains game, oryx included. Check out this link, pretty much spot on with right above the elbow. Notice how far forward the shoulder bone is. It's trippy for sure, aiming there because we are so ingrained into avoiding a whitetail's shoulder! Was tough for me to overcome when I was hunting Africa. I had to really repeat "elbow elbow elbow" as I was aiming in order to keep myself from drifting back behind the shoulder like I'm so used to doing.

    I hope you are successful, I would love to see the hero shots! Oryx eluded us in Africa. I saw one once but he wouldn't come in. Tough animals to hunt because they don't need to drink often. My guide also said they are very tough and can run a long way if the shot just clips the back of the lungs so he was adamant I keep my aim point right above the leg.


    http://www.africahunting.com/firearm...placement.html
    Electric Pink Mathews Jewel 50lbs, 25"

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    FatFort, NM
    Posts
    57
    Tsaxybabe, Thanks!! What all did you hunt on your trip? I perused your photo album but didn't see any safari-type pics. I appreciate the thread link; I have the photo printed out to keep with me so I can try and avoid negative transfer of my trained-in aimpoint.
    God Bless Wyoming and Keep It Wild

  20. #20
    Here is a link to my photobucket album with some photos (a lot might be repeats, sorry).

    http://photobucket.com/hntngrlinafrica

    I ended up shooting zebra, eland, nyala, and waterbuck. My husband shot blue wildebeest, kudu, and impala. He also wanted a red hartebeest, blesbok, or warthog but it didn't work out. He kept having those animals come in, but then the dang cape buffalo would show up and run all the other animals out before he could get a shot! Those buffalo were sort of hilarious, actually. They were awesome to see the first couple times, then they got annoying fast! Once they are under your stand, no other animals are allowed to come in. And the buffalo stay as long as they want. Our guide even threw an orange to try and get them to leave, but they just ate it...

    Here is another link that shows several African animals (including another gemsbok pic). Some of them really show how weird their anatomy is! Those impala were tricky too. My husband shot his right in the crease (perfect for whitetail) and the impala only made it about 75 yards, but there was a distinct gut odor...

    http://www.stealthadventures.co.za/Shotplacements.aspx
    Electric Pink Mathews Jewel 50lbs, 25"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •