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Thread: Single cam or Dual cam bow?

  1. #1
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    Question Single cam or Dual cam bow?

    Which you you all prefer? What are some advantages of a single cam bow over a dual cam bow? and what are some advantages of a dual cam bow over a single cam?



  2. #2
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    Single cam bows are generally slightly slower, they eat through the serving on the buss cable regularly and don't have the solid wall. binary cams have the solid wall and strings usually last without getting eaten up and they give you max speed offerings. Single cams have the wins at the national level in 3d and indoor that binary cams simply don't have. At the asa speed limit you can get either single or binary cams up to speed limit by choosing the correct arrow weight pretty easily.

    I shoot a bowtech specialist and have never owned a matthews target bow but i know that they are sweet and proven. I trust my specialist but would love to shoot a hoyt and matthews target bow to see how they compare.

  3. #3
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    Single cam or Dual cam bow?

    For a dummy like me I prefer a single I know how to tune it and if the cam has a draw stop there's no more solid wall out there . 2 cams are cool but just takes longer to tune ( for me)

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    There really aren't any advantages of a single over a dual/hybrid. Not since the invention of modern harnessing materials and string making techniques.

    But the dual/hybrid cams are faster, have firmer walls, have better nock travel at all cam start/stop positions and can be more fine tuned to the archer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by POOREBOY View Post
    For a dummy like me I prefer a single I know how to tune it and if the cam has a draw stop there's no more solid wall out there . 2 cams are cool but just takes longer to tune ( for me)
    I agree. Single cams are smoother and quieter while producing decent speeds.
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  6. #6
    I have always preferred Dual, Binary, or Cam & a Half's over Single cams. To each their own

    Dan

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buster of Xs View Post
    There really aren't any advantages of a single over a dual/hybrid. Not since the invention of modern harnessing materials and string making techniques.

    But the dual/hybrid cams are faster, have firmer walls, have better nock travel at all cam start/stop positions and can be more fine tuned to the archer.
    Yep!

  8. #8
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    I love my cam and a half. But the bowtech binary cam's are very nice.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Padgett View Post
    Single cam bows are generally slightly slower, they eat through the serving on the buss cable regularly and don't have the solid wall. binary cams have the solid wall
    .
    To this point I have only had single cams and not one has had an issue with the serving nor do the walls seem soft, less issue with timing, not having to synch the cams is a plus. Otherwise I agree.
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  10. #10
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    Can someone explain the difference between binary and a hybrid?
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  11. #11
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    It just seems to me that the single cams will tend to take less maintinence. I'm all about less tuning and maintinence. I don't want to spend all kinds of time tuning.

  12. #12
    That's what they want you to think

    Dan


    Quote Originally Posted by bloodtrailz View Post
    It just seems to me that the single cams will tend to take less maintinence. I'm all about less tuning and maintinence. I don't want to spend all kinds of time tuning.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bloodtrailz View Post
    It just seems to me that the single cams will tend to take less maintinence. I'm all about less tuning and maintinence. I don't want to spend all kinds of time tuning.
    The others styles require very little tuning after initial set up. String materials and procedures are so good now it really helps. That is another reason I prefer other cam systems. I don't like the REALLY long string on a single cam.

  14. #14
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    Rather than type again, check this thread out.....this has been hashed out many many times...

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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ****** View Post
    I have always preferred Dual, Binary, or Cam & a Half's over Single cams. To each their own

    Dan
    exactly ! if the single cam or hybrid cam was far superrior it would have shown up by now seems they both have there fan base and both are selling well . in the grand scheme of things they all work same and work well so get what ya like and like what ya get!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buster of Xs View Post
    There really aren't any advantages of a single over a dual/hybrid. Not since the invention of modern harnessing materials and string making techniques.

    But the dual/hybrid cams are faster, have firmer walls, have better nock travel at all cam start/stop positions and can be more fine tuned to the archer.

    Agreed



    Quote Originally Posted by SARASR View Post
    To this point I have only had single cams and not one has had an issue with the serving nor do the walls seem soft, less issue with timing, not having to synch the cams is a plus. Otherwise I agree.
    Since you've only had single cams you don't know the difference in the back walls or if the "timing issues" exist. I have dual cam bows that have had many, many thousands of shots put through them without a single timing issue or the peep rotating even 10 degrees.

    Single cam bows ONLY theoretical advantage is that at a given draw weight they feel smoother. The catch is that they are also generally slower so if you set a dual cam bow and single cam bow to produce the same arrow speed there is much less difference in the draw cycle if any. The dual cam may be set at a lower draw weight BUT it puts the arrow down range at the same speed as a higher draw weight single cam bow, i.e. the dual cam is generally more efficient hence less draw weight is necessary to match the single cam bow.

    I do not know if it still hold true but 6'ish years ago I couldn't find a single cam bow with a 26" draw that could come close to the Martin dual Nitrous cam bows I was shooting at the time. The Prestige from Mathews was the first single cam bow that I found had good performance with a short draw.
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  17. #17
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    So what you all are saying is that it comes down to speed? more speed off a dual cam? do you think one is more accurate than the other? I do realize I'm spliiting hairs there but...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by bloodtrailz View Post
    So what you all are saying is that it comes down to speed? more speed off a dual cam? do you think one is more accurate than the other? I do realize I'm spliiting hairs there but...
    The twin cam shoot through cable systems overall has the least variables to contend with. The archers ability to execute consistent shots is FAR more important than the cam system! The primary selling point of the single cam was the timing of the cam or cams. On a single cam bow the cables and string can elongate and the average archer won't be much effected or notice. For peak performance however the archer knowing how to "tune" his single cam bow was very important. With current string/cable materials and the building methods the advantage of the single cam even for the average archer is not measurable. The inherent inefficiency of the single cam compared to twin cams however still exist.

    There is a reason Mathews began producing dual cam bows after touting the single cam as the greatest for so many years.............. It does not hold water any more. For some of us it never did.
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    Know when to walk away and know when to run.
    You never count your money when you're sittin' at the table."
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  19. #19
    to me its single cam all the way, its just not worth the extra 5fps your gonna get with dual cams.Also some binaries are real finicky to tune and very touchy on what arrow flies good. Steering a fixed wing head is another story i dont want to get into.
    Ive owned alot of both brands and i will say the binaries are solid on the back end and more shock free,but definitely not smoother on the draw(same i think).
    No one brought this point up as well!!!!!!!
    -when you tie in or serve a drop away rest on the downward buss cable with a binary cam system you will have to twist/untwist your cables to get them back in time,sometimes this can go on for days till you get just where you want it.The single cams are more forgiving to a drop away rest being tied into the buss cable,but still requires a twist or so as well.
    -Could be just me! but im assuming thats why you see alot of binary cam bows with a limbdriven rest of some sort or a lizard tongue style rest.you can put just about any rest on a single cam be shooting accurate in no time.
    Guess it all comes down to what you were introduced to and feel in love with as well how much speed is a factor to you.JMO

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by doemadness@luck View Post
    to me its single cam all the way, its just not worth the extra 5fps your gonna get with dual cams.Also some binaries are real finicky to tune and very touchy on what arrow flies good. Steering a fixed wing head is another story i dont want to get into.
    Ive owned alot of both brands and i will say the binaries are solid on the back end and more shock free,but definitely not smoother on the draw(same i think).
    No one brought this point up as well!!!!!!!
    -when you tie in or serve a drop away rest on the downward buss cable with a binary cam system you will have to twist/untwist your cables to get them back in time,sometimes this can go on for days till you get just where you want it.The single cams are more forgiving to a drop away rest being tied into the buss cable,but still requires a twist or so as well.
    -Could be just me! but im assuming thats why you see alot of binary cam bows with a limbdriven rest of some sort or a lizard tongue style rest.you can put just about any rest on a single cam be shooting accurate in no time.
    Guess it all comes down to what you were introduced to and feel in love with as well how much speed is a factor to you.JMO
    Don't know where to really start. This is all opposite of my experience. Glad we have choices. Just as an FYI I had owned 6 Mathews bows from 98 until 2005. That is when I purchased my last Solo Cam. They do nothing better IMHO. Sure they can shoot well that is proven. But they do nothing better than other cam styles.

  21. #21
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    give me a dual cam anyday..

  22. #22
    X2!!

    Dan


    Quote Originally Posted by Beentown View Post
    Don't know where to really start. This is all opposite of my experience. Glad we have choices. Just as an FYI I had owned 6 Mathews bows from 98 until 2005. That is when I purchased my last Solo Cam. They do nothing better IMHO. Sure they can shoot well that is proven. But they do nothing better than other cam styles.

  23. #23
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    This was probably gonna end up a 50/50 thread eh? you all are right, I guess it just comes down to what you prefer because if you prefer a two cam system than you will probably not care about tuning it and if your a single cam dude, than you won't care about losing speed. To each their own. Well I was just curious what everyones opinion was and why? thanks for all the input guys.

  24. #24
    Single cams became popular when their speeds caught up to the older 2 cam bows. The older 2 cam bows were hard to keep in sync above 65% let off. Single cams had 80% let off. So when the single cam speed matched the 2 cam speed with higher let off, people made the move to single cam bows. Single cams were the main choice for several years and every company was making them. Then hoyt started developing the cam 1/2 in 2003 and it instantly gained popularity. Hoyt didn't invent the cam 1/2 but they nade it popular. Pse got on the cam 1/2 trend and push the performance even higher. THen bowtech developed the binary and it has gained a lot of popularity and there are a lot of companies producing some type of binary.

    The single cam gained it's popularity due to some advantages over the older 2 cam bows. But just as single cams gained popularity, other cam systems have gained popularity due to advantages over single cams. The main advantage the cam 1/2 have over the single cam is performance. When other cam systems started gaining performance increases over the single cam, people started making the move to cam 1/2 and binary bows.

    A cam 1/2 system works like a single cam system with the added advantage of a top cam. This gives better tunability and better performance. It also gives a better draw cycle at high performance levels.

    The binary cam is a modified older 2 cam system. It is wired differently which allows it to be fully slaved which allows for higher let off and reduces syncing errors. It also gives it the best draw cycle (force draw curve) of any cam system at high preformance levels. Binary cams produce good nock travel and are the easiest cam system to tune. Due to being symetrical, the valley can be adjusted from small to large without tuning problems. The draw lengths changes don't effect the nock travel.

    All 3 cam systems are great. It really comes down to personal feel. I like the binary cams the best, I grew up in the older 2 cam bow and am partial to 2 cam designs. I think the simplicity of 2 symetrical cam are easy to understand. Binary cams are easy to tune and have a better valley. Since they are fully slaved, syncing issues are non existent. The force draw curve is more symetrical. I think the binary is the best design.

    How well a person can shoot a particular bow or cam system is what determines what is best for them.

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