Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: What's the difference between a longbow, shortbow, recurve, and a reflex?

  1. #1

    What's the difference between a longbow, shortbow, recurve, and a reflex?

    Please forgive my stupidity.
    What's the difference between a longbow, a shortbow, a recurve, and a reflex?
    I don't want to start a war, I want to know the difference. Advantages, disadvantages, what it looks like, variants, etc.
    I made a conclusion: (although I am sure I am wrong)
    Longbows are "long bows," that are shaped like a D while not drawn/string not pulled, and provides better accuracy and velocity than shortbows.
    Shortbows are "short bows," that are also shaped like a D while not drawn, but are smaller (hence the name) and I think you can shoot faster.
    Longbows and shortbows can also be a recurve bow which has the ends turned so that the string also touches a part of the limb. Even though it can get damaged more easily, and is louder, they can hold more energy and fire arrows at higher velocity.
    Long bows and short bows not only can be recurves, but also reflex bows, which the center is like point inward toward the archer? (Kinda hard to say) and I THINK provide good grip.
    Lastly, any bow that is a recurve and/or a reflex is usually a compound bow which is a bow made of multiple materials to strengthen the bow.


    Thats my conclusion but I am sure I am wrong.



  2. #2

    Hello?

    Can anyone tell em.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    Posts
    207
    I assume Wikipedia would tell you the differences... (not trying to be a smart A)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    561
    Some of your conclusions are close, but not quite. Not knowing where you got your information I'll just clear it up.

    A longbow is basically 'not' a recurve. They can be 'D' shaped or reflex/deflex (semi-recurve). But, the string cannot touch the limb anywhere other than at the loop end where the string attaches. A recurve has very aggressive curve to the limbs and the string will touch the limb at some point on each.

    Longbows are quieter and usually lighter given the same length. A hybrid long bow (reflex deflex) will be faster than a D bow.
    Recurves are normally faster, but louder (string slapping the limb) and more than likely heavier.

    Neither a long bow or a recurve are compound bows (no cams) and could be made of basically any material (usually wood or metal).

    I've never heard of a 'short bow' being anything other than what it's name says (a relatively short bow). Therefore it could be any type (long bow, recurve, or a compound). The name implies alot of subjectivity.

    A simple google search would have answered your questions, but hope that helps.
    Ross Cardiac 70# @ 27"
    Don Dow Hybrid Long Bow 50# @ 28"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,276
    Quote Originally Posted by Altiman94 View Post
    Some of your conclusions are close, but not quite. Not knowing where you got your information I'll just clear it up.

    A longbow is basically 'not' a recurve. They can be 'D' shaped or reflex/deflex (semi-recurve). But, the string cannot touch the limb anywhere other than at the loop end where the string attaches. A recurve has very aggressive curve to the limbs and the string will touch the limb at some point on each.

    Longbows are quieter and usually lighter given the same length. A hybrid long bow (reflex deflex) will be faster than a D bow.
    Recurves are normally faster, but louder (string slapping the limb) and more than likely heavier.

    Neither a long bow or a recurve are compound bows (no cams) and could be made of basically any material (usually wood or metal).

    I've never heard of a 'short bow' being anything other than what it's name says (a relatively short bow). Therefore it could be any type (long bow, recurve, or a compound). The name implies alot of subjectivity.

    A simple google search would have answered your questions, but hope that helps.

    Yup! I would also mention that a longbow tends to be more forgiving because of their length. However, it's a little more difficult to find the right spined arrow for a longbow vs a recurve due to the archers paradox.
    Savage Model 11 - Nikon ProStaff 3X9X40 - 85 grain HSA Sierra HPBT
    Remington 870 Wingmaster 26" WadWizard Supreme Choke
    Mathews Helim - 64lbs - Hogg Father - G5 Archery Expert II

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •