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Thread: Back tension release technique.

  1. #1
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    Back tension release technique.

    I am new to BT, just bought a brand new Scott Long horn3. Tried it a couple of times in the shop(with some instructions from the pro-shop owner) who shoots the same... Love at first try.
    Now I am currently just praticing with a piece of rope that has my draw length until I get it right.
    A question to those who have experience, I am at full draw, elbow high clicker in position ready to release and as soon as I relax all my fingers, the release triggers off.
    Is that how it's suppose to work????
    For me it feels like a surprise release, but I simply want to make sure I am not developing a bad habit.
    Or should I keep my fingers tight and do the contraction of the back muscles, or the backward movement of the draw elbow...???
    A bit confused here...please help.



  2. #2
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    Relaxing the hand is required -- if you intentionally (or not) have tension in the hand, it will be hard to get the release to fire, regardless of how much you pull. You should have a relaxed hand and then as you apply the BT for rotation the release will fire. Some people shoot with just relaxing the hand only but this is not the norm. If it fires when you simply relax your hand, set it for a little more travel -- you want to relax and pull through the shot.

  3. #3
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    You do not want to have to relax the hand to make it go off. Your release arm should be completely relaxed, with only the fingers holding the release. You want the same pressure on each finger on the release. You simply want to have that final squeeze/pull/rotation of the shoulder/scapula to fire. You do not want to get in the habit of just relaxing pressure to fire. You want to maintain the same equal pull and pressure at all times.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobVos
    Relaxing the hand is required -- if you intentionally (or not) have tension in the hand, it will be hard to get the release to fire, regardless of how much you pull. You should have a relaxed hand and then as you apply the BT for rotation the release will fire. Some people shoot with just relaxing the hand only but this is not the norm. If it fires when you simply relax your hand, set it for a little more travel -- you want to relax and pull through the shot.
    Ok then, maybe I can relax my fingers a bit more before my draw, while still making sure that the release stays in my hand, prior to coming to full draw. Is that Ok ??
    Because I can make it work both ways, simply wanted to make sure I' doing the right thing.

  5. #5
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    Jeff Button (ChPro) covers this very well in the "Straight Talk from the Pros" video. You might want to check it out.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bcriner
    You do not want to have to relax the hand to make it go off. Your release arm should be completely relaxed, with only the fingers holding the release. You want the same pressure on each finger on the release. You simply want to have that final squeeze/pull/rotation of the shoulder/scapula to fire. You do not want to get in the habit of just relaxing pressure to fire. You want to maintain the same equal pull and pressure at all times.
    BCRINER, I get you!!! I've been experimenting a lot with my practice rope so far and I am discovering all kinds. Just making sure I use the right technique and not developing a bad habit.

  7. #7

    Probably get a number of different responses

    People will shoot a triggerless a few different ways for me, I pull through the shot without relaxing my hand or rotating it consciously. That's the way I learned how to do it and how I felt it should be shot. There's some who shoot that way and others who don't, or use some type of variation. My feelings are you need to find a technique that you won't be able to anticipate, which is why I use a pull through method. If you can relax your hand and are not able to anticipate when it will fire as you relax then there's no reason why it can't work. Personally I prefer a little more aggresive style of shooting in that I have to work through a shot as opposed to relaxing into it, this way I don't have to worry about the release going off too soon if I happen to relax a little during the shot or get a little fatigued. If I relax too much the shot's not going to go off, there's a fine line between shooting relaxed while making an aggressive shot. Good luck with the new release.
    We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit. -Aristotle

  8. #8

    Back tension technique

    I agree with Fletch I don't relax my release hand.I hold the release naturally and make a comfortable fist,draw with the thumb grab and anchor in,take my thumb off the grab and with a set hand position begin to apply back tension.
    I relax my bow hand,aim and push with the bow side of my back (between my shouler blades) and pull with the release side.Your back tension becomes the trigger and not your hand,I want a positive hook up to my back but not a death grip,just a solid even pressured repeatable grip on the release this gives you more controll and less to think about during your shot sequence.
    When the shot breaks continue to aim and push and pull through the shot this keeps the shot active thats what you want.

  9. #9
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    Here is my answer as it has worked wonders for me. Try practicing back tension without ever holding your bow. Simulate this feel with your bare hands.take your bow hand and make a grip like you would with a bow in hand. then take your release hand and position it as you were holding a release in which is accustomed to our natural style. practice drawing this combination without a bow and then when you are simulationg full draw practice squeezing your shoulder blades together while concentrating on a relaxed bow hand.You will notice your release hand rolls backwards as it will when actually holding a release and a bow.Practice this until you get the muscle memory down and realize what true back tension really is. It isnt working the release or working the release hand.Its having a completely relaxed bow hand,a comfortable release hand ,and this procedure of squeezing shoulder blades together. I learned true back tension by this practicing this technique. Hope this helps you. Helped me.


    you learn this and all you have to do is concentrate on that spot you wanna hit. And you will more times than not ..


    good luck

  10. #10
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    ok then this is exactly what I mean, different opinions and different ways of doing it. I am sure each one has value, up to me to choose which suits me best and the results will talk.
    Thaanks aall

  11. #11

    Different Circumstances call for different methods

    Having more than one way to manipulate a BT release keeps
    your options open during pressure events. You are just learning
    the BT. Take advantage of your muscles not being set to
    one movement and learn at least 3 methods to set it off.
    The traditional push pull involves a lot of muscle movement and
    during a long shoot muscle control will change slightly.
    Relaxing the hand and raising the release elbow up and back is the
    other most common way to properly execute the BT. It requires
    less muscle on the shot and is ideal to use after you've become
    tired or let down once or twice and still not made the shot. Release
    goes through its cycle quicker with this method.
    The fastest way to set off a BT and still obtain a subconcious release
    is to allow the release to roll around your index finger as your other
    fingers relax. This causes a fast rotation around the pivot point(index
    finger) this method is also an easy way to get over that trouble target
    that you can't execute your push pull technique on.
    Another benifit of implementing multiple techniques is it slows the minds
    attempts at learning the release. This helps with keeping anitcipation
    at bay.
    By the way Scott Longhorn 3 finger is the best BT I've shot in 22 years
    of archery. Stick with it.

    Perfectsite

  12. #12
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    Back tension is the key words. You want to pull with your back muscle. Be careful to learn to use the muscle on the release shoulder only. If you pull with one arm and push with the other your follow through will start to create some uncontrolled shots that go to the left if you are a right handed shooter. This is from the front arm pushing the bow away. If you keep your rear elbow high it is easy to preload the muscle needed to do this. Rolling your hand or relaxing your hand will only allow you to anticipate the shot. This becomes the equivilant of punching the trigger. Remember to focus on the spot, and I mean the spot only. If you watch the pin instead of the spot, bad things happen. Your subconscience will put the pin where it needs to be. Good luck.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by perfectsite
    Having more than one way to manipulate a BT release keeps
    your options open during pressure events. You are just learning
    the BT. Take advantage of your muscles not being set to
    one movement and learn at least 3 methods to set it off.
    The traditional push pull involves a lot of muscle movement and
    during a long shoot muscle control will change slightly.
    Relaxing the hand and raising the release elbow up and back is the
    other most common way to properly execute the BT. It requires
    less muscle on the shot and is ideal to use after you've become
    tired or let down once or twice and still not made the shot. Release
    goes through its cycle quicker with this method.
    The fastest way to set off a BT and still obtain a subconcious release
    is to allow the release to roll around your index finger as your other
    fingers relax. This causes a fast rotation around the pivot point(index
    finger) this method is also an easy way to get over that trouble target
    that you can't execute your push pull technique on.
    Another benifit of implementing multiple techniques is it slows the minds
    attempts at learning the release. This helps with keeping anitcipation
    at bay.
    By the way Scott Longhorn 3 finger is the best BT I've shot in 22 years
    of archery. Stick with it.

    Perfectsite
    I couldn't have described it any better! Great post

  14. #14
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    What works for me is: drawing elbow up and slowly backwards, bringing the whole shoulder/upper arm unit with it. This works when I'm shooting compound with a back tension release, and also when I'm finger-shooting recurve and longbow.

    Don't go over-thinking it on the shooting line. Thinking about the drawing elbow is simple and reliable.

  15. #15
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    Back tension release technique

    I am learning so much thru this post, it definitely confirms a lot of details I have been experiencing so far, simply by practicing with my prictice cord for the last 2 weeks.
    Now again the scott longhorn3 is an excellent release, fell in love with it at first try, great technology... But being a designer/tool-mold maker/ I always have the urge of "Tweaking" any mechanical invention that falls into my hand.
    My personal view, since I believe that no humans are made equal, I feel that the thumb post is way too far forward to my taste, I feel like I have to over extend my thumb to reach the post and that results in a rather large "rotation" or "motion" around my "pivoting" index finger.
    Sooooo... I intend to make a personalised or "custom" handle that would "fit" my hand. My fingers and hand is rather small as compared to others, then I also believe that Scott had no other options but to design a release that would fit the "general" shooters hand.
    I will move back the post, I will post up a picture once I and done with the manufacturing.

  16. #16
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    Check out copper john/stanislawski or zenith. They make releases for small and medium hands. Pretty smart fellers........

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bcriner
    You do not want to have to relax the hand to make it go off. Your release arm should be completely relaxed, with only the fingers holding the release. You want the same pressure on each finger on the release. You simply want to have that final squeeze/pull/rotation of the shoulder/scapula to fire. You do not want to get in the habit of just relaxing pressure to fire. You want to maintain the same equal pull and pressure at all times.
    I'm with bcriner on this one. I'm no expert and I've been using a BT release for just over a year now. When I start to get lazy and just relax my hand or slip my grip on the release is when I get in trouble. I start getting right flyers because my follow through is different than when I push/pull by applying proper BT. I found this out after my last shoot. On the last few targets on a hot day my impact was to the right of my aim point. I then went right to the practice bales and shot once at 40 yards. 3 in. right of the dot. I confirmed the same thing in my next practice session. If I stop pulling with my back and just relax the hand my point of impact drifts to the right. Important lesson learned.

    R/T

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