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Thread: Arrow Trajectory From a Tree Stand

  1. #1
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    Arrow Trajectory From a Tree Stand

    When shooting from an elevated position I noticed that as a target gets closer there is a point where my point of aim no longer coincides with the spot where the arrow hits. A certain amount of "hold under" is necessary. Is there a way to calculate how far out that point is?



    Thanks


  2. #2
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    Bend at the waist...your poi should be the same at ground level as it is out of the stand. Biggest issue with many archers is shooting high when in the stand. This is due to the change in anchor because "we" tend to simply lower our bow arm to line up with the target. Draw level...bend at the waist...
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  3. #3
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    Yes, I do this for 3d shooting. Go out and shoot from 9 yds and shoot all the way back to 20 yds and pay attention to what happens, for me I shoot dead on perfect at 9 and 10 yds and then as I go back one yd at a time I end up about a half inch high at 16 yds and then the arrow starts back down until I am perfect at 20 yds again. So basically I am dead on at 9yds and 20 yds with the same 20yd pin.

    What you really need to do is study what happens on even closer shots because on a straight down shot at a deer many guys make a bad shot there and have no idea how to aim on that one.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wenty View Post
    Bend at the waist...your poi should be the same at ground level as it is out of the stand. Biggest issue with many archers is shooting high when in the stand. This is due to the change in anchor because "we" tend to simply lower our bow arm to line up with the target. Draw level...bend at the waist...
    Yep, this will solve the problem.
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  5. #5
    I have a Angle Range Compensator (ARC) rangefinder. It helps with things like this. I have noticed though, and this is why I always say to verify and test - test - test, before you trust it in a hunting scenario you had better test it out. My rangefinder says that at 45 yards at about a 30 degree downhill shot that I should shoot 3 yards short. Well, When I shoot for exactly 45 yards I am about three yards short. Exactly opposite of what the rangefinder says. A long time ago I remember that the rule of thumb was to add distance when shooting downhill and remove distance when shooting uphill.
    The bottom line is that you should make sure that YOU know where the bow hits in different situations. If you did some complex math, taking taking into account the distance between peep and nock point, velocity, angle of shot, and our good friend, gravity you could build a chart.

    Frankly, I would get in my stand and range my target(s) and find out where you need to aim or how much to add/remove from the distance. This will give you the confidence that you need in a hunting situation.

  6. #6
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    The closer to vertical you are aiming (up or down) the less the arrow is going to drop along the flight. Gravity is still affecting it, but gravity is always pulling down. If you aim straight up it will slow the arrow down but the arrow is still going to go in a straight line. If you aim straight down, then gravity is speeding it up but the arrow is still travelling in a straight line.

  7. #7
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    1. Others have nailed it and that is bend at the waist and dont drop your bow arm.

    Disclaimer.....This is assuming the first pin is sighted in for 20 yards.

    2. Somewhere between 7-10 yards depending on the speed of the bow your 20 yard pin is going to be below your aiming point. You need to find out what distance that is by doing the following...... OP put a target at 1 yard level with your shoulders Draw and shoot your 20 yard pin at a small 1/2" target. You will be low every time. Pull your arrow and repeat this at all distances up to 10 yards to see what happens. Somewhere between 7-10 yards you will hit perfectly on that spot you are aiming at. The reason you put the target level with your shoulder area is so you dont drop your bow arm.

    Padgett gave a description of what happens between 9 and 20 on his bow and that is shooting high which is to be expected above that 7-10 yard mark.

    The arrow crosses the sight pin at two points in it's trajectory. For most modern bows the first point is going to be somewhere in that 7-10 yard mark and the second time will be for the distance the pin is sighted in for. At all other points that path will be below the pin (inside of the 7-10 yard point) or above the sight pin 7-10 yard mark again but up to the point the pin is sighted in for.

    As an example on a target at 3 yards I have to shoot the gap between my 30 and 40 yard pins to hit the bullseye. The shorter the ATA of the bow and longer the Archer's DL the more this will be affected due to the string angle at full draw. My current bow is 33.5 ATA. My old Invasion was a 31 ATA bow and on it I had to shoot the gap between my 40 and 50 yard pin due to the higher string angle.
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