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Thread: Climbing to 17+ ft. w/2 Muddy Sticks!!!

  1. #76
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    In a tree 20 feet up
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    1,526
    http://youtu.be/hdjCNg1QTM4



    Here, this is the lightest and cheapest way to climb a tree.


  2. #77
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    "Granite State"
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlh42581 View Post
    Riddle me this... how on earth do you get the stick high enough to strap in to take advantage of the hanging steps. It has to be higher than your reach. Or is this only a prehung type of setup where youre getting up there and making this setup on the way down.
    Making it on the way UP, wherever I want!!!!!!!!

    It's easy to get the height and I'm only 5'10" tall. Just reach up as high as I can, and flip the rope up a bit before slipping it through the cam. (I have a linesman belt I pull somewhat snug around the tree just before placing the stick.) The Muddy quick cams w/rope make it simple to lock it in near the top of your reach. (and even loop it back through for safety as recommended) These 20" sticks are almost perfect in size & design. If I get the muddy rope both tight enough & flipped high enough around the back of the tree: I can actually get it too high to comfortably (and IMO safely) step on the first step of the aider.

    Note: These aiders are 4 step aiders, and are 5 feet in length. IMO, they are also the perfect size for this application. Do the math. Over 7' total for each. I'm 5"10 and can reach up about another foot and a half. (linesman belt fairly tight around the tree) Plus, the top step is about 6 inches above the cam on the stick.

    As I mentioned earlier: The stick part is the easy part. The hard part is the first "booster Stepp" used to get ~18 ft. instead of just ~15 ft. (And of course all the time I spent trying to figure this all out, which partially happened by accident after I was using 4 "Stepps" instead of the Muddy sticks.) ~ That turned out to be a REALLY BAD IDEA!!!!! But since I had all the "software components" I rethought my plans and used my Muddy sticks as a base/mount instead.
    --------------------------------
    "RoadTrips" Tree Saddle, Muddy Sticks & Petzl Aiders?..... "A Killer Combo!"
    My limbs are just fine.... Unlike the '02 TomKat that "detonated" (limbs failed twice) many years ago!

  3. #78
    why do this? why not just carry 4 sticks, they don't weight very much.
    2010 Hoyt Carbon Matrix, 2005 Hoyt Ultratec.

  4. #79
    Ive used the saddle and LW sticks for four years now. Packing those sticks on my back was always as brutal as carrying a climber in. Finally had the bright idea to put my bow on my back and carry the sticks in hand.

    SOO much better. I either bungee my four sticks in a tight 2x2 square, or carry two in each hand now.

    Another advantage as Ive added a webbing strap to my Eberlstock Slingshot pack to wrap the pack around the tree in front of me. The shoulder pad section drops down to become my knee pad, so no more knee pads to carry.


    Those ladders are cool looking though.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Target Tony View Post
    why do this? why not just carry 4 sticks, they don't weight very much.
    Another 5 pounds, double the bulk, slower to attach, less metal to "break", and the steps of a stick are noisier than the aiders. (And only one stick to carry up the tree during setup.) ~ Plus, 10 lbs. of sticks is too much weight (and too bulky) to hang from the front of my sling pack strap. (To keep a free arm for use with GPS etc.)
    --------------------------------
    "RoadTrips" Tree Saddle, Muddy Sticks & Petzl Aiders?..... "A Killer Combo!"
    My limbs are just fine.... Unlike the '02 TomKat that "detonated" (limbs failed twice) many years ago!

  6. #81
    so your packing a long ways back in to go hunting.. i thought so...was just wondering. i know for some of us that only have to go a 1/2 mile to our stands that we don't think about weight. i just set my stands up before the season and then keep my climber ready for being mobile. this however would work pretty good if you were hunting elk and wanted to hunt a tree stand over a wallow and its like 2.5 miles away and 2000 feet of elevation to climb.

    Thanks.
    2010 Hoyt Carbon Matrix, 2005 Hoyt Ultratec.

  7. #82
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Target Tony View Post
    so your packing a long ways back in to go hunting.. i thought so...was just wondering. i know for some of us that only have to go a 1/2 mile to our stands that we don't think about weight. i just set my stands up before the season and then keep my climber ready for being mobile. this however would work pretty good if you were hunting elk and wanted to hunt a tree stand over a wallow and its like 2.5 miles away and 2000 feet of elevation to climb.

    Thanks.
    Exactly, and I have a free hand to navigate etc. But even if you're only moving 1/2 mile in and around regularly, the miles & weight adds up. (Besides, who wants to sweat any more than necessary when in the field?) I've got my "regular stands" with Flex-E Ladders permanently on the trees, but after so many years of use, they have become almost boring. I'm tired of waiting for the deer to come to me. Now I want to "go to them." ~ Besides, this is faster than any method of setup & climb I have ever used.

    You can't effectively use climbers here in the AM. ~ Even when quiet, most trees result in too much noise from the bark etc...
    (There are no 250 lb. squirrels around here @ 5am.)

    One thing I also don't have to worry about anymore is walking through brush with a climber.....
    (Always made me "cringe", regardless of whether it was me or someone else.)
    --------------------------------
    "RoadTrips" Tree Saddle, Muddy Sticks & Petzl Aiders?..... "A Killer Combo!"
    My limbs are just fine.... Unlike the '02 TomKat that "detonated" (limbs failed twice) many years ago!

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ozark, AR
    Posts
    216
    The main reason why I want to try this is not having to worry about hauling three sticks up the tree at once. Also what to do with them on the way down in the dark. I just feel that 4 sticks is clumsy and a pain carrying in and strapping back together in the dark.

  9. #84
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    springville p
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    22
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=If1nxAPM28U

    This guys method worked best for me. I made the ropes 6 inches shorter then him due to my shorter legs but I get up about 28 feet with 3 muddy sticks and four ropes. I just started using it and was surprised how fast it was. I keep myself tied to the tree with my rope an prussic knot that I use to hunt with in my saddle so I am always connected to the tree the whole way up. I have heard and found for myself that getting over about 25 feet gets your scent over the deer as well as out of their peripheral vision.

  10. #85
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    springville p
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    22
    I am new to this site but some of the info shared on here is great and have given me a lot of good ideas. Great source for any bowhunter. I started using a guidos web and saddle this year and will never go back. I actually sold my climber. I use the saddle on shorter sits and the web on all day sits. The rut is getting fired up here in northeast PA and I am starting to see the big ones moving in the middle of the day so all day sits usually pay off now.

  11. #86
    If youre gonna do this because of carrying the sticks up the tree then make yourself two little hangers out of 550 para and attach them to the waist belt of the harness. Up in one trip.

    Believe me, I know the suck of going 1+ miles all up hill with a stand and four sticks. The other thing that keeps sticks quiet is raptor straps. I use one to hold the sticks together and make a handle all in one. The buckle sucks.

    I agree, carrying them in hand helps.

  12. #87
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    Starkville, Mississippi, United States
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    Tagged for when pictures get posted!
    Foot on DA head Turkey Calls
    Owner at Foot on DA Head Calls

  13. #88
    Ttt
    BowJax Shooting Staff
    TNT Revolution

  14. #89
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    In.
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    5,646
    4 LW sticks get me easily to 20 ft...... higher if I use the old Deer Me rope steps for the first two or 3 steps, then I start the sticks or I can do the opposite and end with the rope on's.....
    Liberalism is a mental disorder

  15. #90
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    "Granite State"
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    OK everyone.....

    Here's the photo of me with all my gear heading out for Exploratory hunting with 17+ft climbing capabilities (~5 lbs.) "on-board." (Had a friend shoot photo for me. Wish it was a bit closer.)

    Both sticks are under left shoulder/arm (attached to front side of sling, which offsets the weight of the pack & hang balanced.)
    Frequently I keep my harness packed in sling pack, but I'm wearing it in here. Both aiders and all other gear (including harness main line & ratchet strap w/pegs aka platform) in backpack.
    Booster step is "quick attached" to rear of pack. (Jim Stepp Stepp) Note: I had forgotten to flip my linesman belt over shoulder for photo.

    One other benefit: I've got a free right hand for GPS navigation/drag etc.... IMHO (for me at least) this is the PERFECT setup for "exploratory hunting." (Subsequent climbs are lightening fast!)

    PS: Doesn't look like it in photo, but the sticks were almost perfectly balanced under arm. The one thing about this I also like is setup speed & stick packing speed. (The two sticks pack so quickly and easily opposing one another, using the Muddy straps to wrap around and lock them tight together.)

    StandAndAll.jpg

    The think hanging from my pack at the back/bottom is a Doyle's hoist. When setting up the stand for the first time, I attach my bow to my pack with the Doyle's hoist & attach the pack to me with "para-chord" and climb. Once setup in the tree I pull up the pack as the Doyle's hoist un-spools. After hanging my pack, I pull up the bow & hunt. (One trip up and down the tree per hunt.)

    It takes a little time to "pre-organize" a setup at the base of the tree, but it takes very little time to actually setup & get up to 17+ feet!

    FYI: On subsequent hunts, I usually keep my pack on my back and my bow attached to my hip while I climb up/down. I always take the lower aider home with me (and the loop that helps me step up to the 3 foot high Jim Stepp Stepp, even if I leave the rest of the setup in a tree overnight for a second hunt... Easy to do.
    --------------------------------
    "RoadTrips" Tree Saddle, Muddy Sticks & Petzl Aiders?..... "A Killer Combo!"
    My limbs are just fine.... Unlike the '02 TomKat that "detonated" (limbs failed twice) many years ago!

  16. #91
    Broken limbs, have you ever tried securing the bottom of the aider to the tree, to minimize the swing/instability you get when climbing on one? I would imagine something like a 1" nylon web would work.

  17. #92
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
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    Overhead
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    3,870
    Cool idea but I would rather carry 2 extra sticks. It's more sturdy and only adds +-5 lbs

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  18. #93
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Arkansas
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    104
    Link not working for me. Interested in seeing pics of setup. I do a lot of public land hunting and need to be mobile. If safe enough it is an interesting idea!

  19. #94
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    Arkansas
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    Ha. Didn't see the other pages on this thread. Sorry!
    Got the pics. Thanks.

  20. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by booone0 View Post
    Broken limbs, have you ever tried securing the bottom of the aider to the tree, to minimize the swing/instability you get when climbing on one? I would imagine something like a 1" nylon web would work.
    That could definitely add some stability, but the problem is: The goal (going up) is to get your boot 1/2 way in on the first rung. (Which not only properly sets up all the steps above, but also gives your boot much needed grip against the tree.) And the best way to do that is to move the aider well to the side while on the bottom rung. Same thing kind of applies going down. ~ You first have to get your toe in the top step (critical) for obvious safety reasons & to make the next one below an "easy target", away from the tree. Also, the aider's natural cantering side-to-side action (going down) makes the aiders easy (for me at least) go get my boots in boot placement for each successive step going down. (Kicks the alternate step to the side and it's easy to see and plant my toe/boot.)

    Ultimately, my thoughts on this suggestion are: Securing the bottom of the aider would cause more problems than it would solve. No matter what you do, you still have to pick the right tree for these aiders to work as expected. (Same thing goes for any tree you hunt out of with a harness, in order to get realistic "close to 360 shooting." ~ So this is not a huge issue IMO.)

    I'm not saying any of this is safe by any means! But with practice, I've become quite adept at doing this. Honestly, I've never had any significant issues or "close calls" from climbing this way.* Early to mid season when I'm not wearing my heavy boots, climbing this way seems "almost natural." (Especially with my new-found freedom to explore and go anywhere.) ~Actually I'm at the point where I almost prefer going up and down with the aiders this way early & mid season. ~ I still use my heavy boots late season and climb aiders, but I'm extra cautious. Particularly the colder it (I) get.

    On a related note, one of my buddies I occasionally hunt with has certainly taken notice. Every time we head in for new grounds, he constantly make reference as to "how light" I am able to hunt, and how he needs to "make some changes" next year. ~ He's 20 years younger than I am. He gets hot & becomes tired from carrying his bow & 30 lbs. worth of dead weight (climber and backpack) on his back as we head for "the middle of nowhere."

    *"Knock on wood."
    --------------------------------
    "RoadTrips" Tree Saddle, Muddy Sticks & Petzl Aiders?..... "A Killer Combo!"
    My limbs are just fine.... Unlike the '02 TomKat that "detonated" (limbs failed twice) many years ago!

  21. #96
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Columbia, MS 39429
    Posts
    1,499
    I like the idea, I have a single step extensor on my bottom stick just to get a couple extra feet. And I love the idea of lightening the load since I walk long distances to stand on public ground mostly. My only concern is the movement of the straps on the wind. Do they flap around in the wind or are they heavy enough to stay stationary?

  22. #97
    Tagged

  23. #98
    Tagged
    The trouble is, you think you have time. - Buddha.

  24. #99
    Thanks for the thoughts broken. Just throwing some ideas out there.

  25. #100
    tagged
    Originally Posted by amcmullen "It's the rut, awesome can happen ANY time!"
    2012 Hoyt Carbon Element
    2007 my first Pope and Young buck
    Virginia Bowhunter's Association member

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