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Thread: Indoor target shooting bow?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,771

    Indoor target shooting bow?

    I would like to get a better understanding as to what general features of a compound bow setup (not just manufacturer/model names) that are best suited for Indoor spot shooting. Although, I suspect examples of specific bows would be helpful so I can relate to the various and knowledgeable replies given.

    I'm new to compound bows, but have used recurves for hunting and some informal indoor shooting for many years.

    Some basic info upfront to help relate to my question... I currently own a PSE Vendetta DC with 50-60# limbs set at it's minimum. I've been shooting it since August and hunted with it this fall. I have slight shoulder strength problems, therefore the minimal poundage. I have already ordered a set of 40-50# limbs, with the intent of hunting in the upper 40's and indoor spot shooting in the lower 40's.

    But, I am contemplating the idea of getting another bow that would be setup exclusively for Indoor shooting. I thoroughly enjoy the smooth roll-over hump with the Drive hybrid cams on the Vendetta, but what about other factors that might assist in the most consistency where Indoor spot shooting is concerned? I understand the importance of shooting form/back tension and how it relates to consistency... the recurve was very challenging in that regard.

    Obviously, a higher brace height and longer axle-axle length is advantageous, but what else? Type of cam/tuning system? Solid wall "keeps you honest"? Arrow rest recommendations, limb driven/cable driven? Those kinds of things....

    thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    High and Dry
    Posts
    3,958
    The right person can make anything shoot. However, going by the success of professional compound target archers, the things you mentioned in adition to adjusability and reliability. Things like blade rests, rear stab mount bushings, shoot through risers/cables. I've found the tinkering aspect to be a part of the fun so I'd say find a good platform and get started with the basics. I prefer a solid wall with low let off (spiral X). Everything else is just shot execution.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Marshfield Missouri
    Posts
    9,588
    Go to the classifieds and just start looking, i am a bowtech shooter but when I look at the classifieds the hoyts just have a high resale value and it is hundreds more than many of the matthews apex or c4 bows if you look hard enough. Any hoyt pro comp or vantage elite would suit you fine and any matthews apex or c4 or prestige will suit you fine and the bowtech specialist. Pse also puts out some awesome target bows.

    To me you need to just look for a bow you can get for 450 to 550 dollars and hopefully it will have a rest and some arrows etc. If you can get a fully set up bow for 700 dollars that has stabs and rest and sight then jump on it if it is from a company I mentioned.

    I am a specialist shooter by bowtech but I am getting a matthews apex 8 to try out this winter and I am excited so hurry up and get one.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    4,619
    The first and most important thing to look for is bow fit. Usually this means adjustable draw length. My guess is that over 90% of archers don't know what their target DL should be.

    Next fit item is ATA & Brace - these work together so that you can achieve optimum target form. That is head upright and centered over your body mass. You want the string angle at full draw to be about 44 degrees from the vertical. Very few new bows do this since the biggest market for the manufacturers is the short hunting bows.

    Low draw weight is a plus - something in the 50# range, but a lot of great scores have been shot with bows drawing less than 40#. For indoor archery, you just need enough arrow speed to clear the ceiling. (and stick in the target). The lower draw weight allows you to shoot more arrows in practice.

    After that a bow with higher holding weight works well for some archers.

    And it helps to have plenty of holes to add stabilization.

    Then comes color. It's a proven fact that blue bows shoot better than any other color. Well, not really. Color makes no difference at all.

    Any bow that fits will work well for target archery. It's just hard to get most archers to understand the importance of fit.

    Hope this helps,
    Allen

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Masontown, PA
    Posts
    1,922
    That Vendetta will shoot just fine for starting out on indoor. Another option to try is just gathering a target sight, scope, long stabs and outfitting that Vendetta in the off season to see how you do. That's if you are wanting to try the Freestyle setup with the long stabs and scope.

    Just an idea to consider...

    If you have shoulder issues, cam selection on the Mathews/Hoyt dedicated target bows may cause you issues since they are 65% letoff leading to higher holding weight than you are used to with the vendetta. I have shoulder problems myself, and Hoyt's Spiral cams put a hurting on me, even turned down to 45lbs. You could search for a Hoyt with Cam 1/2 Plus cams, they draw like butter. Or the GTX cams. The PSE target bows have higher letoff also. The Supra's and Dominators have a very nice draw cycle. Depending on your DL, the Mathews C4's had 75%-80% letoff cams also. Indoor shooting can be a grind, mentally and physically. Being comfortable is a necessity. Pick one you can bang out 60 arrows on in a consistent fashion and not be worn out in the end.

    Blade rests are the most popular, but a lot of guys are doing well with drop- always also. Personal preference there.

    Proper form and mental game is where you will see the most improvements though...

    Quote Originally Posted by PineLander View Post
    I would like to get a better understanding as to what general features of a compound bow setup (not just manufacturer/model names) that are best suited for Indoor spot shooting. Although, I suspect examples of specific bows would be helpful so I can relate to the various and knowledgeable replies given.

    I'm new to compound bows, but have used recurves for hunting and some informal indoor shooting for many years.

    Some basic info upfront to help relate to my question... I currently own a PSE Vendetta DC with 50-60# limbs set at it's minimum. I've been shooting it since August and hunted with it this fall. I have slight shoulder strength problems, therefore the minimal poundage. I have already ordered a set of 40-50# limbs, with the intent of hunting in the upper 40's and indoor spot shooting in the lower 40's.

    But, I am contemplating the idea of getting another bow that would be setup exclusively for Indoor shooting. I thoroughly enjoy the smooth roll-over hump with the Drive hybrid cams on the Vendetta, but what about other factors that might assist in the most consistency where Indoor spot shooting is concerned? I understand the importance of shooting form/back tension and how it relates to consistency... the recurve was very challenging in that regard.

    Obviously, a higher brace height and longer axle-axle length is advantageous, but what else? Type of cam/tuning system? Solid wall "keeps you honest"? Arrow rest recommendations, limb driven/cable driven? Those kinds of things....

    thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    western Maine
    Posts
    4,327
    If you try a PSE Supra, the 2011 models are single-cam versions that have a very smooth draw cycle.

    I like them so much I just bought a second one.
    Kev <><
    2011 Black Supra 60# for target, 38" ATA
    2011 Black Supra 60# for hunting, 38" ATA
    "I have never let down and then wished that I hadn't."

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Muskogee,Ok.
    Posts
    73,546
    Indoor spot bow should be a draw weight very easy to draw 50/60 pounder.



    I think longer axle and longer brace heigth with the right arrow combination give an archer a forgiving set up that easy to shoot.

    All manufactuers have good bows and bow with a longer brace heigth.
    DB
    Archery is an addiction is for me. Vortex Binos, Trophy Taker Rest, Vapor Trail strings, OK-Archery DST 40, Eilte Z28 Bow, Carter/Scott releases, CBE sights, Goldtip arrows, B Stingers Stabilizers, Lancasters Archery, Slick Tricks, Vanetec Vanes, Elite Pulse


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