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Thread: Tuning question on Anarch HC.

  1. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    New Brunswick Canada
    Posts
    106
    Ok. I struggled with that shorter draw length. I find that in order to get the string back to my face I need to bend my bow arm more. I also come to another conclusion. Without holding a bow I naturally stand leaning a bit that same direction. A number of factors are at work here. First, nobody's back is perfectly straight, we all have one leg longer than the other. Albeit these variations are usually slight. To further complicate things I have a lifetime of wrecks. Bicycle wrecks, snowmobile, motor cycle, horse, falling from roof of the house, all of these wrecks have taken their toll on my back. It's actually a wonder I'm still walking. So no small wonder I'm a little off kilter.
    All that to say I have put 1/2" back into draw length. Now at 27-1/2" DL. At 70" wingspan that calculates to 28” DL using the wingspan over 2.5 formula. I'm going to try this DL for a while. I find so far though that I tire out sooner with this shorter DL.

    The suggested adjustments to nock height and arrow rest height have made a big difference. Bare shafts are flying straight and landing the same as fletched arrows. My limb bolts are back to being even. I'm a little confused by this though as having the arrow so un-square from the bow string goes against what I read from Nuts and Bolts.

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Bloomfield, IN
    Posts
    11
    I just orered a new Anarchy HC and it should arrive tomorrow, so I find this thread very interesting. There is obviously a lot of factors to consider when setting up a bow and I'm learning a lot. Good luck WhiskeyZuluFox, I'm anxious to know how this turns out for you.
    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~ Benjamin Franklin

  3. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    7,139
    Quote Originally Posted by ZuluWhiskeyFox View Post
    Ok. I struggled with that shorter draw length. I find that in order to get the string back to my face I need to bend my bow arm more. I also come to another conclusion. Without holding a bow I naturally stand leaning a bit that same direction. A number of factors are at work here. First, nobody's back is perfectly straight, we all have one leg longer than the other. Albeit these variations are usually slight. To further complicate things I have a lifetime of wrecks. Bicycle wrecks, snowmobile, motor cycle, horse, falling from roof of the house, all of these wrecks have taken their toll on my back. It's actually a wonder I'm still walking. So no small wonder I'm a little off kilter.
    All that to say I have put 1/2" back into draw length. Now at 27-1/2" DL. At 70" wingspan that calculates to 28” DL using the wingspan over 2.5 formula. I'm going to try this DL for a while. I find so far though that I tire out sooner with this shorter DL.

    The suggested adjustments to nock height and arrow rest height have made a big difference. Bare shafts are flying straight and landing the same as fletched arrows. My limb bolts are back to being even. I'm a little confused by this though as having the arrow so un-square from the bow string goes against what I read from Nuts and Bolts.
    If you have old injuries and need to modify the classic "T" form to shoot comfortably, by all means do so. The "T" position is just a neutral position that most people have the most success in. Some people, most notably a world champ by the name of Reo Wilde, find that a little different form is best for them. It's all about getting comfortable and shooting your best. Whatever that takes, do it. That said, if you look at a fella like Reo, he may lean back a little but he has all the same "artifacts" that you want in a well aligned form. He has his release forearm in line with the arrow, the front edge of the arrow nock lands under his eye and his release forearm is parallel or a little "elbow high" of parallel with his arrow (you don't want elbow low).

    The wingspan method isn't very accurate for a lot of people. That's partly because it takes into account the length of your hand and fingers which have nothing to do with your DL. It's more accurate to stand with your back against the wall, hold your left arm out to the side and measure from the center of your sternum to the crease where you wrist and hand meet. That's typically pretty close.

    Nuts&Bolts PDF is a great document. It gets a person familiar with the basics. That's pretty much where it ends. Setting the nock height at 90deg works only some bows and is only a starting point even for those bows. Bows with dual cams like the OverDrive Binary cams that come on Bowtechs bows is one example and some binary cams like what's on Elite and their clones is another. Those bows sometimes do tune best with the arrow at 90deg to the string. A hybrid and single cam system with very rarely tune nock level. Because of this, experience tells us that 1/8" high is a good starting point for these bows.
    Bear Anarchy HC
    Bear Anarchy
    60th Anniversary Bear Kodiak Magnum 40#

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    New Brunswick Canada
    Posts
    106


    This was shot from 50 meters. Something's not right.

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    7,139
    Right and left looks good. How do you see your sights? Do you have a good peep diameter to sight diameter so that you can line up the circle within a circle? At 50 meters, if you don't have the sight housing centered in your peep the same every time, you can "walk" the POI up and down pretty easily.

    You could also need to do a creep tune. Creep tuning is designed to get your arrows to land on the same horizontal plane even if you pull more or less into the wall each shot. It's done by adjustments to the cables to find the sweet spot for your cam timing.

    To creep tune, do this.

    Put a piece of masking tape on your target parallel to the ground and at shoulder height. Step back to wherever your first pin is zeroed and fire 3-5 normal shots at that horizontal line. If you make a bad shot or punch the trigger, throw those shots out. We want to see where your good shots are landing. Now fire 3-5 shots at the line but this time pull a little harder into the back wall. 2-3lbs of added pressure should be good and remember to take just the good shots. If you need to shoot more than 5 shots go ahead. Just get a good sense of where the good shots are landing.

    If the harder pulled shots hit higher than the normal shots, add a twist to your control cable and reshoot in the same way you just did. If they hit lower, add a twist to your buss cable.

    If you find that 1 whole twist on either cable is too much, use the yoke legs and take 1 or add 1 full twist to each. This will keep your cam lean but will make a smaller adjustment than 1 full twist in the bottom of the buss.

    When you find the sweet spot, your normal and hard shots will hit on the same plane.
    Bear Anarchy HC
    Bear Anarchy
    60th Anniversary Bear Kodiak Magnum 40#

  6. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    New Brunswick Canada
    Posts
    106
    I think you're on to something on both. I could use a smaller dia scope. I try to place level in the bottom of peep the same every time. I'll spend some time with that creep tuning.



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