a href="http://www.lancasterarchery.com/archery-classic-register/#header">
Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: How do you get rid of gamey taste?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Kankakee,Il
    Posts
    380

    How do you get rid of gamey taste?

    I like the taste of deer, but, it's too "gamey" for my wife. She loves deer sausage(I assume cause it's not all deer meat), but, last time I tried to make a stew, she said it was too gamey.



    Is there a way to marinate it to take some of that out? Should I use part beef and part venison for stew? Half and half if I wanna make a chili?

    Thanks in advance for your help!!!
    '04 Hoyt Ultra Sport @ 62#/244 fps
    Drop Tine Whisker Bisquit
    HHA OL-5500 Optimizer
    SIMS Modular Stabilizer
    SIMS Alphashox
    SIMS LimbSavers
    Beman ICS Hunter 400 arrows w/ 100gr Crossfire Broadheads


  2. #2
    You're looking to far into the process. Are you processing your meat yourself? If so, you're probably not removing enough of the silver skin, or the membrane that covers the muscles. If you are taking it to a processor, its almost gauranteed he's not, and he's probably aging your meat too much. Get your deer hung up fast, get him quartered up and processed quickly. I also soak mine in ice and salt water for few hours before I start to debone, cut, process and package the meat.

  3. #3
    Try soaking it in milk overnight (if you don't want to use lots of milk, you can add some water to top it off, too). I don't know why this works, but it does. In addition, some cuts of meat are gamier than others IMO. And like the other guy said, get rid of as much of that silvery skin as possible.

    What you said about the sausage (not being 100% venison) is probably right, too. I have the local processor put 20% beef tallow (more for the juiciness than anything else) in my ground venison and you can't tell the difference from (lean) ground beef at all, other than it sticks together better.

  4. #4

    Getting rid of Gamey taste

    Quote Originally Posted by Stormstaff
    I like the taste of deer, but, it's too "gamey" for my wife. She loves deer sausage(I assume cause it's not all deer meat), but, last time I tried to make a stew, she said it was too gamey.

    Is there a way to marinate it to take some of that out? Should I use part beef and part venison for stew? Half and half if I wanna make a chili?

    Thanks in advance for your help!!!
    As I learned in cooking school, when cooking with venison or moose, use carrots. Carrots will remove the gamey taste from the meat. When cooking a roast, try putting the carrots next to or as close to the meat as possible. When making stew, I'll add 2-3 extra carrots. With chili, and meatloaf, spaghetti sauce, lasagna, I mix the wild meat with beef, usually 40% wild to 60% beef. However, now that the family likes the taste of wild meat, I'll put more wild meat in than beef. Remember that since wild meat is lean, you need to add some hamburger or your lasagna and meatloaf will turn out VERY dry. Hope this helps!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Southeast Missouri
    Posts
    860
    I process my own and the key to good taste is, like others have stated, remove all the membrane, fat, and blood from the meat. After de-boning and removing the membrane, I soak it in a deep sink with iced salt water. I then rinse and add a little vinegar to the water and wash it again. I then rinse all of the meat clean and package it.

    When my wife and I got together, she and her daughter both said that they didn't like deer meat. After having some that I processed, they couldn't get enough. We've gone through 5 deer this past year, as she uses it for everything that calls for beef. She uses it ground in spaghetti, sloppy joes, etc., and she likes to put roasts in the crockpot while at work to cook slowly. When she returns home, she either adds barbecue sauce for sandwiches, onion soup mix to serve as an entree, or gravy to serve with potatoes. When my step-daughter and my son are present, I may have to fry a whole backstrap to get any for myself, as it keeps disappearing off the plate as I cook it.
    When the last deer disappears from the morning mist,
    When the last elk vanishes from the hills,
    When the last buffalo falls on the plains,
    I will hunt mice; for I am a hunter and I must have my freedom.
    - Chief Joseph, Nez Perce Tribe

  6. #6
    i do my deer steaks on the grill and brush butter and garlic on them as they cook, the butter really seems to take the wild taste out, if the kids dont see the package they never know the differance, even have been able to fool a couple guys on it to. if cooking indoors, i use butter in the skillet.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,300
    We butcher our own and I can honestly say I've never noticed any gamey taste. Everyone loves just about every dish I make with it. The key is to make sure to treat it properly after dressing through packaging. Cool the meat quickly, and, if you don't already butcher your own, I suggest you learn. It can be alot of fun. When making your own cuts, clean the meat very well. We cut off all the fat and slimy or sliver skim on the meat. Learn where the glands are in remove them as well. Also, do everything with a knife, not meat saws. Bone dust from a meat saw can foul the meat up and may cause a bad taste. It's pretty easy once you learn where the joints are, and what cuts to make.

    To prevent freezer burn, you should use a vaccum packer, or wrap with cling wrap, then in freezer paper. The freezer paper keeps the meat longer, and the cling wrap directly on the meat protects the surface from freezer burn.

    When you start doing your own deer, you may want to look through some cook books before cutting it up. You don't have to use wild game books either, you can use your favorite recipes, just substitue venison for beef. Pick out some things you want to try, and make your cuts accordingly. We custom cut everything. I have many recipes I like, and we make cuts to fit what I'm going to cook. That may mean leaving a section of backstrap whole, or cutting to 6 inch lengths. Sometimes we debone a whole ham, freeze it, then slice it on a meat slicer for minute steaks. Sometimes I will debone and seperate the muscle sections to make steaks from part of the ham, roasts from another part, and cut the rest in strips for stir fry, or cubes for soups, stews, or other crockpot meals like stroganoff. Again, we always clean the meat up very well, removing almost every bit of the junk. It takes a little time, but is well worth it.

    Front shoulders can be boned out for roasts, or taken deboned meat in bulk to make sausage or burger. The neck can also be used for ground meat/sausage, or in pasta sauce, or, one of my new favorites, as a stuffed roast. If you've cut your own deer, you know the neck comes off in flaps. Trim them up very well, roll them up and freeze them (roll them up so they have the least amount of surface area exposed to the cold...keeps the flavor in). You can then lay them flat after thawing, spread your favorite stuffing on the meat, and roll it up for roasting.

    There are so many things to do with the back straps it would take forever to type. For the most part though, you want that silver covering removed...I do it with a filet knife, just like taking the skin off of a fish. Trim it up very well and freeze them in large sections, usually cut in halfs or thirds. This prevents the meat from drying out in the freezer. Sometimes I will cut them into small, inch thick steaks, but that is when I know I'm going to use them soon, and I only want 3 or 4 steaks. That way, I don't have to thaw out an entire section to get 3 or 4 steaks. If you know ahead of time how you want to use them, you can freeze and label them accordingly. I will also freeze them in 4 or 6 inch sections to later make strips for fajitas, stir fry or kabobs. Or, freeze in larger sections for a stuffed loin roast (you can slit them down the middle, fill with your favorite stuffing, then roast it), or leave in 6 inch sections for grilling, or cut into inch thick steaks for grilling, or cut 1 & 1/2 inch for stuffing, like stuffed pork chops, etc. The point is, know ahead of time what you want to do, cut them and label them accordingly. This makes all the difference. I always put the date on the package too, that way you can use the older stuff first.

    I found over the years that if I plan ahead, know how I want to cook it, I use it more and the meals come out better than if we just cut it in pieces, freeze it, and then figure out what to do after it thaws out. In fact, tonight I'm making a venison stir fry with vegetables over steamed rice.

    One more thing...the tenderloins are never frozen. They are removed right away and used within days of the kill. Cut them into medalions and saute them in butter and black pepper with minced garlic. In a seperate pan saute some fresh mushrooms in butter and black pepper, with some red, green and yellow bell peppers. This is great with asparagus and/or a baked potato, with garlic bread, or can be served over rice (my wife loves rice) with a side of steamed carrots. Or, you can just sear them in olive oil, seasoned with garlic salt and black pepper. Whatever you do, don't over cook them. Venison should be cooked medium rare. Overcooking can lead to a gamey taste as well. If you like your meat well done, buy beef because venison can get gamey tasting when over cooked.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Punxsutawney,PA
    Posts
    1,020
    all of the above tips are great and will definately help you get rid of the gamey taste, last year though we had some hind quarter meat that was just cut up on to peices that we were going to make jerkey out of but decided to try a marineade instead, me and my college buddies got a big bole dumped a can of beer, about 2 cups of worchester sauce a half cup of soy sauce and about 2 teaspoons of vinager and about 3 teaspoons of luquid smoke and some fresh ground pepper and garlic powdre we let it marinate over nite and cooked it the next day on the grill everybody there thought they were eating fillet minion and they were eating almost 2 year old slightly freezer burnt whitetail!! it was truely amazing~!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    EC, NC
    Posts
    2,070
    debone and season with sage

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Zeeland, Michigan
    Posts
    365
    Quote Originally Posted by phatbowman1
    all of the above tips are great and will definately help you get rid of the gamey taste, last year though we had some hind quarter meat that was just cut up on to peices that we were going to make jerkey out of but decided to try a marineade instead, me and my college buddies got a big bole dumped a can of beer, about 2 cups of worchester sauce a half cup of soy sauce and about 2 teaspoons of vinager and about 3 teaspoons of luquid smoke and some fresh ground pepper and garlic powdre we let it marinate over nite and cooked it the next day on the grill everybody there thought they were eating fillet minion and they were eating almost 2 year old slightly freezer burnt whitetail!! it was truely amazing~!
    Thanks for the marineade recipe. I've been just soaking mine in thousand island dressing overnight and it's been good but i've been looking to try something different.
    anyone know of any other good ones?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Concord, NC
    Posts
    921
    Soak in milk.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Southcentral Kentucky
    Posts
    6,509

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by archer55
    I process my own and the key to good taste is, like others have stated, remove all the membrane, fat, and blood from the meat. After de-boning and removing the membrane, I soak it in a deep sink with iced salt water. I then rinse and add a little vinegar to the water and wash it again. I then rinse all of the meat clean and package it.

    This is great advice. The washing and using vinegar works great. Then marinade with the sauces of your choice and enjoy. Vinegar really makes a difference but dont use too much and rinse throughly.
    Martin Archery Dealer located in SOUTHCENTRAL KENTUCKY 270-774-7470
    MEMBER MFL CLUB! 2015 Models Arriving November

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Wyoming, Michigan
    Posts
    231
    Someone told me if you are cooking it in a crock pot, to put a tablespoon of coffee grounds in it...anyone ever tried this?


    Personally, I don't notice much if any wild taste...I'm a big believer in trimming the fat and membranes, and as stated above, band saws are a big no-no..the sawdust from the bones just wrecks the flavor... Just de-bone everything, & rinse well.....

  14. #14

    Exclamation

    If you don't like it shoot at a target.

  15. #15
    If possible I suggest ageing for 5-7 days. That is a great help. As the others said process your self and remove as much silver skin and tallow as possible.

  16. #16

    Thumbs up

    One of the things I've learned over the years is to be sure you get every hair off during the butchering process. The hairs can and do leave their mark on the flavor.

Similar Threads

  1. Just a taste!
    By jgbennett6 in forum Massachusetts
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: March 2nd, 2010, 08:37 AM
  2. gamey meat recipe
    By matthewsmesiah13 in forum Wild Game Cooking
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: January 22nd, 2008, 09:50 PM
  3. Taste
    By swerve in forum Mutantville
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: January 21st, 2008, 09:19 PM
  4. taste?
    By FL-HNT-N-FSH in forum Bowhunting and Bowhunter Showcases
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: September 4th, 2007, 03:00 AM
  5. How does it taste??
    By D-Bak in forum Bowhunting and Bowhunter Showcases
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: March 2nd, 2005, 06:42 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •