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Thread: Browning Olympian Tuning?

  1. #1

    Red face Browning Olympian Tuning?

    I have a Browning Olympian with 39# CCK limbs. This is my first attempt at setting up a competition style takedown recurve. It seems like there is an excessive amount of handshock, but I come from shooting a compound so...
    The inforamation that I am looking for is how to go about tuning this type of bow. It has tiller adjustments for both limbs but I'm not sure where to start. Can someone help me with some instructions, or a place to find instructions on setting up and tuning a bow of this type?



  2. #2
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    reacher -

    I'm not familiar with that particular model, but I assume it's an Olympic/FITA type bow. For first pass, tune it like any other recurve. If you have the right arrows, brace height and string type will have the greatest effect on handshock.

    As far as tiller, keep the limbs set to 0/0, to lower limb 1/8" shorter than the upper, measured from the point where the limbs leave the riser.

    You might also want to download the Easton tuning guides from www.eastonarchery.com and definately look at http://www.archersreference.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/

    Have fun!

    Viper1 out.

  3. #3

    vintage Browning Olympian?

    I have just bought a bow from ebay, said it was a Browning Olympian but I haven't been able to find anything about vintage Browning Olympian's and I was wondering if anyone here could help to positively identify the bow.
    Please have a look at the ebay auction here. it's got lots of good photos and a close-up of the serial numbers.
    I thought for sure it was a ExplorerII at first, but it's 68" so Im a bit baffled.

    Im just starting traditional archery, and Im hopeing that I mad a wise chioce in buying this bow, I guess we'll see when it arrives.
    Thanks for any help that can be offered
    sj

  4. #4
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    johnson -

    I was looking at that bow myself, if I didn't already have a few of ... anyway...

    I don't know the exact model name, but it's Browning's basic style riser and limb configuration as used on the Explorer hunting bows and Monarch target bows (and a few others). Use a 12 strand B-50 Dacron string and start with a brace height of 8". You may have to twist it a bit to find the sweet spot. Arrow will depend on draw length/arrow length, but if arrow length is between 27 and 29" think about 1816s.

    Unless it was abused, and I don't think it was, you should have a great shooting bow.

    Viper1 out.

  5. #5
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    Looking at the pictures I see that the arrow rest has seen better days I would invest in a new Hoyt super rest if I were you.

  6. #6
    If you've ever set up a recurve or longbow, its pretty much the same procedure. Set the brace height, then match the limb weight to the arrow spine. The only big difference is that Olympic style recurves have plungers.

  7. #7
    Wow thanks for the quick responses,
    s google search revealed a pic of a browning monarch and thats the closest I've found(as far as eye-balling it)to the one I bought.
    Being my 1st bow and not really knowing what I want/need, I am starting to get a lil nerves about the length of the bow, can anyone comment on having a 68" recurve.
    I 'm going to be doing recreational archery and 3D targets, and maybe someday, hunting. Any opinions on pros/cons to what I've gotten myself into by picking this bow?
    Thanks again for the posts and encouragement.
    Oh, and I got a 14 strand B-50, is that ok or is there an advantage to useing a 12 strand?

  8. #8
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    You should have no problems with the lenght of the bow when using it from a standing position. Longer bows are generally smoother to draw and less likely to stack. (stacking is a no linear and sudden increase in draw weight when the bow is drawn to near its full draw lenght) You will notice any thing touching the limbs when you draw the bow and if that happens then just move to get clearance.
    As for the number of strands 14 will slow the bow down a little but given the age of the bow that is not necessarily a bad thing it will give the bow an easier time and I don't think it will effect the tuning too much. It might be wise to fit a sight to the bow for tuning as this will make bear shaft tuning much easier. If you don't want to do that then a tooth pick taped to the bow will do. Although from the look of the sight window that bow was intended to have a sight and shot with a one over two under under the chin anchor and will be tillered for that.Is it bushed for a stabiliser. Some old Target style bows were.If not in those days you went to a bowyer and got the riser drilled and bushed. If it is then I would recomend a straight alumimium stab but that is up to you.
    One other thing ,get an arm guard recvurve gives you a little less clearance between the string and bow arm. Hope this helps.
    Last edited by jerrytee; July 1st, 2006 at 08:57 PM.

  9. #9
    thanks Jerry.
    I appreciate your time, I keep posting here with my progress.
    Hope that it doesn't take too long for the bow to get shipped.
    When is does I'll really be able to see what I've got.
    Thanks again

  10. #10
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    johnson -

    The Monarch I have is 70" and rosewood, the wood color was what made me question the model.

    68" will prove to be a excellent choice for the type of shooting you'll be doing. I would stay with a 12 strand B-50 string as it will give you a better nock fit on the (I assume) 1816s you'll be using - see my last post. I'll disagree with jerry on the 14 strand being safer than the 12. The difference in speed will be marginal (but not zero) and the 12 strand will stretch a bit more on shock and that's where the "protection" comes from, but doubt you'll actually need it.

    Also don't worry too much about tuning, give the arrow a slight offset from center (which will happen with any rest) and set the nocking point so the arrow's nock is about 1/8" above perpendicular. You can only tune the bow was well as you can shoot. So get used to it first and then worry about tuning.

    Viper1 out.

  11. #11
    I guess I kinda jumped the gun, cause I orded a 14 strand string from ebay, and the seller is such a good ebayer, he's already sent the string.
    So I guess Ill have to figure something out, I suppose you guys'll laugh if I unwind the string and cut out a couple strands.But I may not have too we'll see when I try it out with the arrows. What will I noticable if the notch is too tight?
    True about only tuning as good as I can shoot. I just wanna make sure nothing is really wrong right off the start that could throw me for a loop.
    "give the arrow a slight offset from center" are you refering to the notch here or the rest positioning.
    Thanks again for all the help guys

  12. #12
    cutting a couple of strands off the string won't change the nock fit. If its 14 strands of b50, it will probably just be a little tight. Not really a problem if you can live with it. Beware what you buy on ebay, you usually get what you pay for.

  13. #13
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    re -

    You certainly can us a 14 strand string on a bow of that weight.The biggest problem you'll have is nock fit. Strangely enough the major Dacron manufacturers are recommending 16 strand Dacron strings across the board and a lot of new bows are coming with 16 strand Dacron strings as a default. (I have no idea why, and wouldn't personally do, but it's been done. Just get the right one next time.)

    The difference in speed may be detectable with a chronograph, and will be a factor of weight and nock fit. At this point don't worry too much about it.

    Viper1 out.

  14. #14
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    The Browning Olympian with the limbs mentioned was introduced in the mid 90's. Its claim to fame was that World Indoor Champion Magnus Peterson of Sweden shot a Browning (with a tox athenian sight) well enough to win the silver (behind Justin Huish's gold) at Atlanta. I believe the riser was made by "Petron" of Europe. The limbs were designed by flight shooting legend Harry Drake. There were two bows (the Olympian and another, the name escapes me) and two type of limbs-ceramic boron i believe and the carbon kevlar (sort of like Yamaha). The biggest drawback to these fine bows was that they used a NON ILF LIMB. instead of the normal bushing they used two ball detents IIRC. that meant you were stuck using browning limbs on their risers which killed them in terms of sales. Browning then came out with a petron built ILF bow a couple years later-I never saw one ever at a US shoot though I saw them on some european sites.

    generally, they tune like other Fita olympic bows. IF its 68" a 65" string is the starting point with a brace height in the 8.75-9 inch range
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